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COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MINUTES OF MEETING OF COMMITTEE ON BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS 
January 8, 1970, 10:30 a.m., Room 410, Statler Hilton Hotel, Boston 



PRESENT: 



Chairman Haigis, President Lederle; 
Trustees Crowley, Knowles, Maginnis, 
Pumphret, Treasurer Johnson, 
Secretary McCartney. 



3437 



ALSO 
PRESENT: 



Trustee Olken, Provost Tippo, Dean 

Gugin, Dr. Gage, Messrs. Averill and 
Littlefield, Professors Barron and 
Zube, Mr. Moneta, Mrs. Hull, UM/A; 
Chancellor Broderick, Vice-Chancellor 
Hamilton, Dean Gagnon, Messrs. O'Brien 
and Prince; Professors Antonoff, 
Becker, Kaplan, Weaver, UM/B; Dean 
Soutter, UM/W; from Campbell, Aldrich 
and Nulty, Mr. Lawrence Nulty; from 
Goody and Clancy, Mr. John Clancy. 

Chairman Haigis convened the meeting at 10:30 a.m. 
Mr. Littlefield, University Planning Officer, UM/A, was requested 
by the Chairman to present the agenda items for the Amherst campus 
Regarding item one, Feasibility Study - Infirmary Addition , Mr. 
Littlefield noted that the original request of $1.7 million for the 
Infirmary addition had been cut to $1.36 million by the Legislature 
A further request will be made, to provide, hopefully, for a largei 
Phase II of construction than shown in the original plans. Dr. 
Robert Gage, Director, and Mr. Barry Averill of the University 
Health Services staff were present for the discussion. 

Copies of plans showing allocation of the 39,000 gross 
square feet of space for Phase I were distributed. The site loca- 
tion, being the west face of the existing Infirmary, is "tight." 
Parking space is limited; but it is not expected that relocation 
of the greenhouse or the road will be necessary. 

Mr. John Clancy, of the architectural firm of Goody and 
Clancy, detailed the construction plans for the Infirmary addi- 
tion. Phase I - Infirmary addition - calls basically for a two- 
floor addition to the existing Infirmary. The out-patient clinic 
will be housed on the first floor. The basement floor will pro- 
vide space for medical records, X-ray and physical therapy facili- 
ties, and mechanicals. Phase II, for later construction will con- 
sist of three additional floors housing administrative offices, in- 
patient clinics and a mental health clinic. Exterior design, when 
the building is completed, will be compatible with the existing 
Infirmary. Elevations will be presented at a later date. 

President Lederle questioned practical aspects of con- 
struction of additional floors when the building is in use. 



Feasibility 
Study - 
Infirmary 
Addition 
UM/Amherst 



3438 



COMMITTEE 



Feasibility 
Study - 
Graduate 
Research 
Center 
UM/ Amherst 

Mathematics 
and Physics 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Dr. Gage responded that, while this arrangement is not ideal, and 
there would be some problems with dust and noise, there is precedent 
for such phasing of construction. There is no alternative, he said, 
unless funds for the entire project were available at this time. 

It was then moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
the Phase I, Feasibility Study for the In- 
firmary Addition, UM/A as submitted by the 
architectural firm of Goody and Clancy, be 
approved at a total project cost of 
$1,368,000 based on 1969 construction costs 
and subject to availability of BBC infla- 
tionary contingency funds. (Document T70-047) 

Turning to the second agenda item - Feasibility Study - 
Mathematics and Physics , Chairman Haigis introduced Mr. Lawrence 
Nulty of Campbell, Aldrich and Nulty. Using a model of the Graduate 
Research Center on display, Mr. Nulty pointed out the two addi- 
tional towers for Mathematics and Physics that are to be added to 
the 17-story Chemistry Tower that is now under construction. Strong 
verticals are emphasized in the architecture with the completion of 
the two 16-story Mathematics and Physics towers. A future six- 
story wing will be connected to the towers by tunnels. The total 
effect of the site will be that of a pleasant open plaza which pre- 
sents at the same time a feeling of unification. 

Proportionate space requirements, Mr. Nulty said, based on 
an enrollment ceiling of 28,000 to 30,000 have been revised with 
some space originally planned for Chemistry now being allocated to 
Physics and Mathematics. The fenestration of the buildings, how- 
ever, will not be changed from earlier plans. There was discussion 
of student circulation loads which would result from this change. 
Mr. Johnson raised in particular the question of adequacy of eleva- 
tor service. Mr. Nulty said that the elevator service had been 
studied and would be on the fringe of acceptable limits. Dean 
Wagner had been consulted and had agreed that a possible waiting 
time of 48.5 seconds was preferable to the cost of providing addi- 
tional elevators. Mr. Nulty suggested that this question should 
perhaps be raised again with the faculty. 

Trustee Knowles questioned the location of X-ray facili- 
ties on the central floors and the resulting possible danger of 
radiation leakage. Mr. Nulty replied that adequate protection from 
this hazard had been included in the planning at no additional ex- 
pense beyond that of basic protection. 

Escalation of building costs due to inflation was 
discussed. Trustee Pumphret raised the question of effect of in- 
flation on equipment costs. The policy, Mr. Littlefield said, is 
to work with the current dollar figures for construction and equip- 
ment and for the BBC to set aside an amount equaling 107o of these 
figures from their contingency funds to provide for inflation. 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

The total estimated cost of the project is $10,355,000. 
After further discussion, and on motion made and seconded, 



it was 



3439 



VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that the 
Feasibility Study for Phase II - Mathematics 
and Physics Towers (Document T70-048) of the 
Graduate Research Center as presented by the 
architectural firm of Campbell, Aldrich and 
Nulty, Inc. be approved at a total project 
cost of $10,355,000 based on 1969 construction 
costs and subject to availability of BBC in- 
flationary contingency funds. 

Discussion next turned to a proposed feasibility study 
for a new dining commons to serve enrollment increase on the Amherst 
campus. Mr. Littlefield noted that the capacity of the North and 
South Dining Commons would be reached with completion of the 1970 
dormitories. For student enrollment increases beyond 1970, it will 
be necessary to request the Building Authority to construct addi- 
tional dining commons. 

Dr. Leon Barron, Master of Orchard Hill Residential 
College, was introduced. Dr. Barron presented a composite of 
various letters written re Orchard Hill since 1965. In order to 
find space for meetings of students and faculty fellows of Orchard 
Hill outside of classrooms, it has been necessary, Dr. Barron said, 
to move meetings and "dorm dinners" around to available space at 
either North or South Dining Commons. This space will no longer be 
available. A multi-purpose building is needed which will seat 
approximately 650 persons and serve for social gatherings and as an 
auditorium as well as a dining commons. 

Chairman Haigis noted the need for legislation authorizing 
the University Building Authority to construct multi-use buildings 
for the University. Trustee Pumphret voiced the opinion that the 
multi-use of buildings under existing legislation should be further 
explored. He proposed that the University Building Authority be 
requested to make a feasibility study on the need and uses of multi 
purpose, self-liquidating buildings in the future. Mr. Pumphret 
suggested that if the Trustees request a dining hall the Authority 
would make such a feasibility study and report the results to the 
Trustees before the building design was committed. 



After further discussion and on motion made and seconded, 



it was 



VOTED: To recommend to the Board of Trustees: 

WHEREAS University of Massachusetts Building 
Authority (the "Authority") is authorized by 
Chapter 773 of the Acts of 1960, as amended 



Feasibility 
Study - 
Dining Halls 

UM/Amherst 



Orchard 
Hill 



3 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

by Chapter 736 of the Acts of 1962, by 
Chapter 684 of the Acts of 1963, by 
Chapter 845 of the Acts of 1965, by 
Chapter 670 of the Acts of 1966, by 
Chapter 344 and 400 of the Acts of 1968, 
and by Chapter 638 of the Acts of 1969 
(said Chapter 773 as so amended being here- 
inafter referred to as the "Enabling Act"), 
among other things, to construct buildings 
and structures upon written request made by 
authority of the Trustees (the "Trustees") 
of the University of Massachusetts (the 
"University") and upon determination by the 
Trustees that a project is designed primarily 
to provide facilities for, among other things, 
the housing, feeding, medical care or extra 
curricular use by University students, staff 
and dependents; Now, Therefore 

BE IT RESOLVED That John W. Lederle, President 
of the University, be and he hereby is authorized 
in the name and on behalf of the Trustees to 
make a written request of the Authority that it 
construct a building or buildings to be used as 
a multi-purpose dining facility in the vicinity 
of the Orchard Hill Dormitories having a capacity 
of approximately 650 seats so as to feed approxi- 
mately 1,300 students at each meal on the basis 
of two sittings for the use of the University, 
its students, staff and their dependents, includ- 
ing those uses referred to in Section 3 of the 
Enabling Act; that the construction by the 
Authority of said building or buildings and the 
provision and installation by the Authority with 
respect to or in said building or buildings of 
furnishings, furniture, machinery, equipment 
and facilities and such related approaches, 
driveways, parking areas, planting and landscap- 
ing as may hereafter be approved by authority 
of the Trustees be and the same hereby is de- 
termined to be a project designed primarily for 
the feeding and extra-curricular use of University 
students, staff and dependents. 

Treasurer Johnson noted the desirability of having a study 
of this type coincide with the Sasaki, Dawson, DeMay Associates 
Feasibility Study for Future Student Housing - Amherst, presently 
underway. 

Chairman Haigis next presented Agenda Item three: Final 
Plans - Belchertown Pomology Storage Building . He noted the 



3441 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

the regrettable architectural delay in completion of these plans. 
The estimated construction costs are $336,000. The BBC allocation 
made on January 2, 1969 is $320,000. The expectation is that the 
BBC will cover the deficit from contingency funds. 

On motion made and seconded, it was then 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
the final plans and specifications as pre- 
sented by the architectural firm of James A. 
Britton of Greenfield, Massachusetts be 
approved for the construction of the Belcher- 
town Pomology Storage Building subject to 
availability of BBC inflationary contingency 
funds. (Document T70-049) 

Chancellor Broderick of the University of Massachusetts/ 
Boston presented two agenda items together: Renovations - Capital 
Budget - 100 Arlington Street and Rental of More Space . 

The overall issue, the Chancellor said, is that the pre- 
sent facilities will be in use until completion of the first phase 
of the Columbia Point campus at an indeterminate time: 1972, or 
possibly 1973 or 1974. In order to provide for a gradual increase 
in enrollment rather than an abrupt increase when UM/Boston finally 
moves to Columbia Point, it will be necessary to rent auxiliary 
space for the interim period in the University of Park Square. 

Vice-Chancellor Hamilton explained that this matter had 
not been presented to the Board previously because the UM/B planning 
staff was shorthanded (two persons with overtime work needed) to 
deal with other aspects of planning. Referring to his memorandum of 
January 7, 1970 to President Lederle, Mr. Hamilton reviewed the pro 
posed plan for Phase V of renovations at 100 Arlington Street at an 
estimated cost of $927,341. Twenty-one percent of the total cost is 
for the renovation of existing laboratories and the construction of 
additional faculty research laboratories and TL is for the construc- 
tion of additional faculty office space. These renovations will 
result in the loss of 22 classrooms and one seminar room to new 
laboratories and shops, and the relocation of some 15 offices. 
Several existing laboratories require modifications for use by 
advance courses . 

UM/Boston faculty members and department chairmen were 
present to give further details of plans for their departments: 
Dr. Kaplan - Biology, Dr. Antonoff - Physics, and Dr. Becker - 
Chemistry. 

Chairman Haigis at this point introduced Cynthia Olken, 
Class of 1970, the newly appointed student trustee. Miss Olken, a 
senior from Sharon, is President of the UM/A Student Senate. She 
will represent the student bodies of both University campuses. 
(In 1971 the Student Trustee will be elected from the Boston campus) 



Belcher town 
Pomology 
Storage 
Building - 
Final Plans 



Renovations 
UM/Boston 
100 Arlington 
Street 



Student 
Trustee 



3442 



COMMITTEE 



Rental of 
More Space 
UM/ Bos ton 



Renovations - 
UM/ Bos ton 
100 Arlington 
Street 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

"President Lederle noted that he had not been informed 
until recently of the need for this approximately one million 
dollar capital outlay for UM/Boston and that the request properly 
should have been structured into the regular capital outlay program 
and reviewed by the Trustees earlier. Although not happy about the 
timing of this request, the President said it was understandable, 
for only recently had the Boston campus been able to reach a decisio|n 

on expansion by 500 students in fiscal year 1971, and from that 
decision renovation and additional rental space requirements were a 
consequence . 

Trustee Crowley expressed the opinion that action should 
be taken solely on the basis of student need. "If the students need 
admission, the necessary arrangements should be made." 

President Lederle raised several questions including the 
possibility of improvisation for the interim period, utilization 
rates of the existing facilities; also, the possibility of further 
utilization through establishment of night classes. "Establishment 
of night classes," he emphasized, "is part of the role of the urban 
university. " 

Professor Becker expressed the opinion that night classes 
might or might not solve the space problems as such offerings would 
attract "a different clientele." He also noted that the laboratories 
at 100 Arlington Street would have many potential uses, including 
possible use as a center for environmental studies. 

Regarding Rental of More Space to enlarge facilities and 
to house students displaced due to renovations and rearrangements, 
Vice-Chancellor Hamilton said that two adjacent buildings were 
available for lease : 367 Boylston Street and the building on 
Newbury Street presently housing (until June, 1970) the Bryant and 
Stratton School. Each building can be leased at a yearly figure of 
$175,000, the lease figure to include renovations at 367 Boylston 
Street. The Newbury Street building already functions as a class- 
room building and renovations would not be required. Commitments 
must be made by March, 1970. The proposals have the preliminary 
approval of Commissioner Shepard, the Vice-Chancellor said. 

After further discussion, President Lederle agreed to re- 
quest $950,000 in Special Capital Outlay funds for the University 
of Massachusetts/Boston campus for Fiscal '70. It was then moved, 
seconded and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
they authorize a special capital outlay re- 
quest for Fiscal 1970 in the amount of 
$950,000 for the purpose of renovations at 
UM/Boston, 100 Arlington Street, for the 
purpose of accepting 500 additional stu- 
dents in each of the next two years. 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

It was further 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
authorization be obtained through an appro- 
priation for the lease of approximately 
54,000 square feet of floor space for a 
period of three years to accommodate an en- 
rollment increase of 500 students in each of 
the next two years, and that the sum of 
$14,000 be requested as a special appropria- 
tion for this purpose for the current fiscal 
year. 

Turning to Item Three on the Boston agenda: Space 
Programs - Columbia Point , Chancellor Broderick said the effort 
had been made to be "coherent rather than final" in presentation of 
space needs for the six buildings for which the architects have 
been selected. Space allocations have already been presented to 
the Board for three of the six buildings - the library, administra- 
tion and central supply buildings. Summary and budget sheets for 
the colleges and science center - buildings 010, 020 and 080 
(Documents T70-050, T70-051 and T70-052 were distributed by Mr. 
Prince.) 

Professor Weaver noted that special efforts had been made 
to reconcile differences between the faculty and administration 
view on space needs, and to present at this time allocations which 
have been approved by the faculty. 

Trustee Pumphret asked Chairman Haigis if he had been in- 
volved in planning these space programs. The Chairman responded 
that he had not been involved. He added that there was opposition 
to some aspects of the program; for instance, there is a possible 
proliferation of swimming pools and duplication of dining facilities 
in the several colleges. A 150 million dollar capital outlay is 
involved. Mr. Haigis said he plans to call a meeting of the Build- 
ings and Grounds Committee as quickly as possible to review all 
aspects of space planning with the UM/Boston campus administration. 

He also expressed agreement with Trustee Olken's sug- 
gestion that there be representation from the Boston student body 
at such a meeting. 

UM/B Planning Officer O'Brien noted that the coordinating 
architects assigned to the Columbia Point project had arranged to 
occupy a conveniently located headquarters at 333 Washington Street 
and that they would be in their offices by January 20, 1970. The 
first order of business will be to establish a construction budget. 
Chairman Haigis noted even if a slight delay was caused by Board of 
Trustee review of plans, the size and scope of the project demands 
this action. 

President Lederle requested the UM/Boston administration 
and planning staff to draw up an agenda of issues for the Buildings 
and Grounds Committee meeting to be held on January 20, 1970. 



3443 



Space 
Programs 

Columbia 
Point 



3444 



Parcel (B) 

Columbia 

Point 



COMMITTEE 



Worcester - 
Exterior 
Color 
Power Plant 






Medical 
School - 
Applications 



Scheduling 
of Buildings 
Worcester 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Vice-Chancellor Hamilton noted one further item: 
acquisition of Parcel (B) at Columbia Point, on which there was 
general discussion. 

It was moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that, in' 
accordance with Chapter 898, Item 7490-0102 of 
the Acts of 1969, and all other acts, authoriz- 
ing the Trustees of the University to acquire 
land, or land with buildings thereon, by pur- 
chase or by eminent domain under Chapter 79 of 
the General Laws, for the development of the 
University of Massachusetts at Columbia Point 
in the City of Boston; independent appraisals 
having been made by qualified disinterested 
appraisers and filed with Vice-Chancellor 
William R. Hamilton, Jr.; the Trustees of the 
University take by eminent domain in fee, a 
parcel of land now or formerly owned by the 
City of Boston and designated as Parcel (B) 
on a plan entitled "Plan of Land in Boston, 
(Dorchester) Mass.," surveyed by New England 
Survey Servides, Inc., October 6, 1969 
(Document T70-027) , and that Robert J. McCartney, 
Secretary, Board of Trustees, is hereby authorized 
to sign the order to taking for and in the name 
of the Board of Trustees. 

The meeting continued through lunch with Dean Soutter pre 
senting the agenda items for Worcester: Exterior Color - Power 
Plant ; also Scheduling of Buildings . Regarding the exterior color o 
the power plant, the Dean said that the architects were working on 
developing samples of alternate siding colors. As soon as this is 
done they will contact Trustee Knowles and Dean Belluschi to arrange 
a meeting. 

Applications for the Medical School have totaled 296, with 
six from out of state. (Dean Soutter 's prediction had been 300) 
Forty of these have been placed in the top group; 60 have been 
classified as acceptable; 50-60 are considered borderline, and the 
remainder are unacceptable. Five students have been formally 
accepted. Of these five, three are female. Four of the five are 
University of Massachusetts students. 

Scheduling of Buildings - Worcester continues to be a 
history of delays and engineering problems. Dean Soutter detailed 
delays in completion dates for both Shaw Building renovations and 
the Medical Science Building. Assistance is needed, he said, from 
a higher level than the BBC in order to meet the actual deadlines 
for operning operations and the scheduling of the first classes; 
also, to avoid further deficits due to inflation. 



I 



COMMITTEE 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Engineering problems have arisen with the power plant. 
The problem is that all basic equipment is electrically operated. 
In case of power failure this would render the power plant largely 
inoperable. University and General Electric engineers and others 
have gone over the plans . The BBC concurs that they are unworkable 
from an engineering viewpoint. A steam study is now being done. 

Plans now call for partial occupancy of the Medical 
Science Building in the fall of 1972 for 32 students, with probable 
partial occupancy in the fall of '73 for 64 students. The building 
is expected to be completed by fall, '74 with a full class enrolled 
and occupying the premises. 

Dean Soutter noted one final item regarding the Medical 
School. A letter was written to HEW on November 4, 1969 requesting 
funding of the hospital grant of $16 million. Two months later, 
not having received a reply, Dean Soutter telephoned Dr. Gallagher 
who reported that the federal government wants assurance from the 
Commonwealth of the state's share of the funding. 

The meeting was adjourned at 1:30 p.m. 



3445 




Robe 
Secretar 



J. McCartney 
Board of Truste 




Engineering 
Problems - 

Worcester 
Power Plant 



Medical 
School 
Occupancy 
Schedule 



Medical 
School ■ 
HEW 
Grant 



I 



3446 



COMMITTEE 



Black 

Studies 

Program 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF COMMITTEE ON FACULTY AND EDUCATIONAL POLICY 
January 8, 1970, 130 p.m., Statler Hilton Hotel, Boston, Mass. 



PRESENT: 



ALSO 
PRESENT: 



Chairman Troy, President Lederle; 
Trustees Boyden, Greenblatt, Haigis, 
Lambson, Maginnis, Olken, Secretary 
McCartney. 



Provost Tippo, Trustee Snowden, 
Chancellor Broderick, Dean Gagnon, 
Mrs. Hull; also present from UM/B: 
Grace Clarke, Thomas Conward, Edwin 
Gittleman, Quizella T. Henderson, 
Lula Hamilton, Alvan Johnson, 
Marilyn Lima, Canute McClarence, 
Joseph Peltier, Thorn Shepard, Ronald 
Traylor, Bob White. 



Chairman Troy convened the meeting at 2:15 p.m. He ex- 
pressed the hope that today's discussion would be helpful toward 
development of a mature Black Studies Program and that there would 
be an increase in the number of black faculty members at UM/Boston. 
Chancellor Broderick was invited to comment on the Report of the 
Ad Hoc Committee on Afro-American Studies dated June 10, 1969. 

The Chancellor commented that the report had been pre- 
pared during the first days of June last year, was distributed in 
September of 1969 and that the UM/Boston Faculty Senate had approvec 
and accepted it only recently. He noted that the higher educational 
institutions from the Boston area are in the process of putting to- 
gether a cooperative black studies program which "begins to look 
like a coordinated major for the entire Boston area." This will be 
an attempt to utilize the resources of all the member institutions 
to bring in "six or eight top notchers." (faculty members) 

Trustee Greenblatt inquired whether this effort might not 
lead to an entirely new entity such as Hampshire College. The Ford 
Foundation is supporting this program for a period of 1.5 years and 
insists that the universities demonstrate that the program will be 
continued thereafter. The Chairman called upon Mr. Alvan Johnson 
of the Afro-American Society to update the committee on recent pro- 
gress. Mr. Johnson indicated that meetings have been held every 
two weeks to determine the current status of the coalition. The 
group now seeks to determine what ongoing faculty activities exist 
in this area on the Brandeis, Northeastern, Boston University, 
Harvard, Boston College and UM/Boston campuses. The above institu- 
tions are members of the coalition. 

In further discussion, where the coalition group had 
found no specific plans on a given campus, alternatives for the 
future had been considered. Mr. Johnson added that implementation 
at UM/Boston may be difficult because the blak students have not yet 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

seen a concrete plan had have already pre-registered which means 
that they would be required to reschedule courses if the black 
studies program is approved. 

Dean Gagnon observed that the Ford program called for 
establishment of graduate studies programs as well as centers of 
studies which would serve the particular campuses closest to them. 
Individual campuses of the size of Harvard, Boston University and' 
UM/Boston would also have their own undergraduate programs available 

A survey of the black studies program at Harvard Uni- 
versity was provided to Chairman Troy by Mr. Joynson. 

Dr. Gittleman and Mr. Peltier, co-chairmen of the Afro- 
American Studies Committee, commented that, to date, most professors 
had not set up their courses to include black related material. It 
was felt that such material might be included, for example, in 
History 111 and 112; also in Sociology, Anthropology, Economics and 
English. 

Trustee Snwoden inquired whether the academic departments 
at UM/Boston had been advised that inclusion of such material is a 
commitment by the entire University, so that a positive response is 
called for. Dr. Gittleman responded that the Faculty Senate had 
endorsed the report unanimously after the Academic Affairs Committee 
had done so. The Chancellor has given approval; also, the report 
has been printed in its entirety in Mass Media . In Dr. Gittleman' s 
opinion, the entire campus should have been informed by now. 

Chairman Troy expressed his feeling that new courses in 
black studies would prove immensely valuable at UM/Boston, but -- 
for information purposes -- queried about the involvement 'of 
similar material in, for example, a western civilization intro- 
ductory course from the Renaissance down, etc. Mr. White responded 
that much material was available which could contribute to such 
courses . 

Miss Lima added that the Afro-American Society would be 
happy to present some sample courses and delineate what the content 
might be. 

Mr. Johnson stated that there was a basic disagreement 
with the approach of the faculty committee on the black studies 
program. Progress has been too slow, he observed. Chairman Troy 
called on Dean Gagnon to comment. The Dean observed that, apart 
from the regular slowness of all academic committees, the faculty 
has been concentrating on establishing the general curriculum as a 
new institution "where it is difficult to get things done."" Never- 
theless, the departments "have been working at it," Dean Gagnon 
added, particularly at recruitment of black faculty. 

Mr. Peltier queried what timetable was involved. Dean 
Gagnon responded, "basically -- within a year." This schedule would 
call for introductory courses to be established in the coming 



344? 



3448 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

semester. (Two upperclass courses were introduced last year). "In 
1970, there would be the start of a black studies concentration,', 1 
Dean Gagnon said adding, "this is well within the timetable we can 
achieve." He pointed out, however, that it would be more honest not 
to promise a hard and fast timetable because of the emergency of 
possible unforeseen difficulties, particularly in the area of re- 
cruitment. Trustee Snwwden observed that there is a real question 
here of urgency and priorities, and that if UM/Boston feels "a 
sense of commitment" then timetables become less important. . 

Mr. Johnson concurred. He noted that the Dean had indi- 
cated that eight courses appeared to be a reasonable number; how- 
ever, after a year, not a single course has materialized. "We feel, 
he added, "that the bureaucratic structure is being utilized to the 
fullest to slow down implementation." 

Mr. White observed that any attempt to alter the structure 
of introductory courses was the most difficult task of all. "One 
hears," he said, "of department heads trying to firm up their. de- 
partmental programs; this is exactly contrary to what we are trying 
to do. It is during this process that changes need to be introduced 
into the program. Once the course is established, it will need to 
be disestablished in order to achieve the same result." 

Chancellor Broderick said it was time to be precise about 
the action needed in such areas as to the introductory courses, the 
upper level courses and the major. He also reviewed some of the 
problems related to recruitment. He added that changing the intro- 
ductory courses is a "harder problem" because change has to come at 
the departmental level where time-consuming negotiations must be 
carried on by the Faculty Senate committee rather than the adminis- 
tration in such areas as western civilization, English, etc. As 
far as administrative sanction is concerned, "sufficient high level 
policy statements now exist to cover these problems," he concluded, 
adding that creation of a Black Studies Department hinges on 
achievement of point number two (development of upper level courses) 

President Lederle expressed disappointment that the pro- 
gram in black studies at UM/Boston had not proceeded with more 
speed. "This is why we came into the city," he said, -- "to create 
an Urban University." The President added that persons not willing 
to go along with the Urban University concept should not be en- 
couraged to remain on the campus. 

Trustee Olken expressed concern that UM/Boston apparently 
"is not keeping the black faculty it already has." Chairman Troy 
said that this question will be considered later on. 

There followed discussion in which members of the Afro- 
American Society including Messrs. Johnson, White and Shepard cited 
various instances where the black contribution to culture has been 
documented, but is seemingly not easily available in the library at 
UM/Boston. Chairman Troy noted that the library, for the time being 
reflects a great many other deficiencies as well, in terms of its 
collection. 



3449 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Mr. Shepard concluded in agreement with Trustee Olken, 
adding that we need to "bring it all down front." The hiring of 
black professors is a part of the same problem as the tenure 
question and the shortage of black cultural reference material, 
inauguration of black studies courses, etc. Mrs. Snowden added 
that, if the administration and faculty "really believe in this," 
they will "get out and do it." She called also for positive re- 
wards to those faculty members who do something, as well as negativi 
sanctions against those who fail to perform. 

Discussion followed on an appropriate form which would 
summarize the committee's concern as well as sound a call to early 
and positive action as a result of today's meeting. President 
Lederle noted that this was an opportunity to draft a resolution 
declaring why UM/Boston had been founded as the urban, public uni- 
versity of the Commonwealth. 

Trustee Greenblatt sounded a note of caution, adding that 
he is currently concluding work on a book on "Dynamics of Institu- 
tional Change." He observed that much difference of opinion could 
revolve around what is "appropriate speed." The "institutional 
climate is particularly sensitive," he said, "among scholars and 
educators who don't like to be pushed around." 

Trustee Haigis clarified the role of the Board of 
Trustees as relating exclusively to policy questions. 

There was much further exchange of views concerning the 
precise form which a resolution should take, and the conclusion was 
that Messrs. Gittleman and Peltier, co-chairmen of the UM/Boston 
Afro-American Studies Committee would draw up a resolution for pre- 
sentation to President Lederle who will review it, along with Chair 
man Troy, prior to its being issued to the University of Massa- 
chusetts/Boston faculty after adoption by the Board of Trustees. 

Discussion on tenure questions relating to black members 
of the faculty was postponed to a subsequent meeting in Boston on 
a date to be announced. 



The meeting was adjourned at 4 00 p.m. 




tol&ert J. McCart 
Secretary, Board of Tru 



es 



3450 



COMMITTEE 



Sabbatical 

Leaves 

1970-71 



Merit 

Increases 

1970-71 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MINUTES OF MEETING OF COMMITTEE ON FACULTY AND EDUCATIONAL POLICY 
January 19, 1970, 10:30 a.m., Board Room, U of M, Amherst 



PRESENT: 



ALSO 
PRESENT: 



Chairman Troy, President Lederle; 
Trustees Boyden, Haigis, Lambson, 
Plimpton; Treasurer Johnson, 
Secretary McCartney. 



UM/A: Provost Tippo; Associate Provosts 
Allen and Gluckstern; Dean Gugin; from 
the Faculty Senate, Professors Burke, 
Morris, Roberts and Ulin; Mrs. Hull. 
UM/B: Dean Gagnon. 



Chairman Troy convened the meeting at 10:55 a.m. and re- 
quested Provost Tippo to comment on the first agenda item - 
Sabbatical Leaves . 

Provost Tippo noted that 66 recommendations for sabbatical 
leave had been made, all following Board policy and all can be 
financed within funds appropriated for this purpose. One request 
from a faculty member on 80% time had been denied, as University 
policy makes only full-time faculty eligible for sabbatical leave. 
There was discussion and clarification of the fact that it is Uni- 
versity policy to permit sabbaticals for the purpose of completion 
of Ph.D. requirements. 



After further discussion and on motion made and seconded, 



it was 



VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees 

approval of the Sabbatical Leave Recommen- 
dations for 1970-71 as submitted by the 
Provost and detailed in Document T70-057. 

Turning to the second agenda item - Merit Increases , 
the Chairman requested the Provost's comments in this area. The 
Provost described in detail (see Provost's memo #5, dated October 7, 
1969) the elaborate procedure of reports and reviews in formulating 
the salary recommendations. Provost Tippo noted that all salaries 
in this computerized listing had been rounded off to the next high- 
est $100 for convenience. The Provost also stated that a request 
had been made to Deans and Department Heads not to recommend incre- 
ments over $1600. In nine cases, however, suggested increments ex- 
ceed $2,000 due to promotion, assignment of additional duties, or 
in order to meet other offers. An over-scale recommendation is 
made for the Acting Dean of Arts and Sciences because no increase 
was given at the time of his appointment to this post -- he ad- 
ministers the largest college and because of the quality of his 
work. The Provost stated that 74% of the Amherst professional staff 
are being recommended for merit increments. The increases amount to 
47o of the salary budget. 



3451 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Chairman Troy expressed the concern of some members of 
the Board at the apparent "open-endedness" of salaries. He noted 
that, even though increases had been necessary in "catching-up" to 
national averangesj it might be desirable to have a leveling-off at 
some point for certain positions. Provost Tippo called attention 
to the numerous persons who are receiving no increase or very 
small increments. 

Provost Tippo stated that the University is not out of 
line in the general scale (lower for instance than the University 
of Connecticut) and that the University has a BB rating and ranks 
130th in the nation on the AAUP list. (City College of New York, 
for example, has recently established a minimum salary of $22,500 
for full professors) . 

He also called attention to the study of administrative 
salaries which compares UMass salaries with comparable salaries in 
other institutions. 



The Chairman observed that current reports seem to indi- 
cate a trend toward fewer positions than candidates in certain 
fields and that the law of supply and demand should soon be having 
an impact on salaries. The Provost pointed out that this trend is 
countered in part by the move toward admissions for all high school 
graduates, i.e. City University of New York where they will have 
15,000 additional freshmen and they are consequently seeking 1,200 
new faculty members for this purpose. The Regents of the State of 
New York are on record as approving a similar open admissions plan. 

It was then moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees 

approval of the Merit Increase Recommen- 
dations for 1970-71 as submitted by the 
Provost and detailed in Document T70-058. 

The third agenda item - Promotions - was next discussed. 
Provst Tippo stated that the list had been carefully screened by 
departments, schools, and the administration. He recommended its 
approval. 

Chairman Troy asked Dean Gagnon to comment for the Uni- 
versity of Massachusetts/Boston. The Dean noted two cases of 
particular merit. He also pointed out that procedures used in 
evaluations had been standardized. The same forms are in use at 
UM/ Bos ton and UM/Amherst. The Chairman requested that, in the 
future, sample evaluations be provided by UM/Boston as had been 
provided this year by Provost Tippo for the Amherst campus. 

After further discussion, it was moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees approval 
of the Recommendations for Promotions as sub- 
mitted for UM/Amherst and UM/Boston, and as 
detailed in Documents T70-059 and T70-060. 



Promotions 
UM/Amherst 

and 
UM/Boston 



3452 



Named Chair - 
Department of 
Government - 
V. 0. Key 

COMMITTEE 



UM/ Amherst 

Faculty 

Senate 

University 

Governance 

Statement 

UM/ Boston 
Statement on 
Governance 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

President Lederle, at the invitation of the Chairman, 
next commented on the proposal that a Named Chair in the Department 
of Government be established in honor of the eminent political 
scientist, Professor V. 0. Key. Professor Key had been the leading 
political scientist in the country during the mid-sixties, Presi- 
dent of the American Political Science Association and Head of the 
Department of Government at Harvard University. It is proposed that 
Professor William Havard, Head of the Department of Government at 
the University of Massachusetts/Amherst, be named to this chair in 
recognition of his outstanding service to the University. 

After discussion and on motion made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that a 

Professorship be established at the University 
of Massachusetts/Amherst in the Department of 
Government in honor of the eminent political 
scientist, Professor V. 0. Key, and that Pro- 
fessor William Havard be named to the Chair. 

Chairman Troy next called for discussion on the fourth 
agenda item - UM/A Faculty Senate Governance Statement . Professors 
Burke, Morris, Roberts and Ulin were introduced to the meeting. 

The Chairman noted that the Faculty Senate statement on 
University Governance had been brought to the Board previously and 
that it had been studied and discussed and changes in wording pro- 
posed. He also pointed out that it was necessary to have the UM/ 
Boston faculty statement at hand so that both could be considered 
within the concept of University reorganization. (The UM/Boston 
statement, Document T70-061, has just been received). 

Copies of a Faculty Senate Document (Motions From Faculty 
Senate Document 69-044, Terminal Report of the Ad Hoc Long-Range 
Planning Committee, voted: May, 1969) were distributed by Professor 
Morris. It was pointed out, however, that the Trustee committee 
members had seen previously only the Faculty Senate UM/A Proposal 
on Facu lty Participation in University Governance - June 1969 (Trus- 
tee Document T70-062) . It was requested that discussion be confined 
to this latter document. It was also established that the proposed 
changes in wording had not been made since the initial presentation 
to the Trustee committee. 

Professor Morris said that the faculty is asking for 
definition of the concept of faculty participation in University 
governance and that, in many respects, the resolution simply spells 
out practices already adopted. 

Treasurer Johnson asked for definition of the terms "all 
decision making" and "all personnel" as used in the document. Pro- 
fessor Morris said that these terms as used were meant to apply to 
matters pertaining to the faculty only. 



I 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Trustee Plimpton expressed concern over the fact that, 
while there was sympathy among those present with much of the spirit 
of the resolution, there would be the danger of future misinterpre 
tation by others unless the wording was more precise. 

It was agreed that the Provost would go over this document 
with members of the Faculty Senate Committee and approve its final 
form for presentation to the Executive Committee of the Board of 
Trustees . 

The Chairman expressed appreciation for the invitation ex 
tended to the Trustees to sit on some committees of the Faculty 
Senate, but it was felt that this would not be possible due to the 
extraordinary demands levied on the time of Board members by trustee 
business . 

The meeting was adjourned for a brief lunch at 1:10 p.m. 
It was reconvened by Chairman Troy at 1:40 p.m. 

In the absence of Professor Barron, who was to have re- 
viewed the Orchard Hill Proposal , Chairman Troy gave a summary of 
the success of this experiment in living "on a human scale" within 
the larger environment of the University. The Chairman noted that 
the University Building Authority has agreed to conduct a feasibili 
ty study, if funds can be found, for a multi-use building for 
Orchard Hill to be used for dining as well as for educational and 
social purposes. 

Provost Tippo noted two final items: some members of the 
College of Agriculture faculty wish to change the status of its 
personnel contracts from a twelve to a nine-month basis. They are 
not willing, however, the Provost said, to accept the usual 157o re- 
duction in pay with this change, and wish to present their case to 
the Board. Finally, two tenure cases, one at UM/ Amherst and one at 
UM/Boston have appealed to the Board. These will be heard at a 
later date. 

The meeting was adjourned at 2:05 p.m. 




Ro 
Secreta 




OA" 



t J. McCartney 
Board of Trust 




3453 



5 



Orchard 

Hill 

Proposal 



3454 



COMMITTEE 



Space 
Program - 
Columbia 
Point 



Space 
Program - 
Buildings 
010, 020 
and 080 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF COMMITTEE ON BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS 
January 20, 1970, 10:00 a.m., Parlor C, Statler Hilton Hotel, Boston 



PRESENT: 



ALSO 
PRESENT: 



Acting Chairman Crowley, President 
Lederle; Trustees Gordon, Knowles, 
Maginnis, Pumphret; Treasurer 
Johnson, Secretary McCartney. 



Trustee Troy, Provost Tippo; Dean 
Gugin, Mr. Littlefield, Mrs. Hull, 
UM/A; Chancellor Broderick, Vice- 
Chancellor Hamilton, Dean Gagnon, 
Mr. O'Brien, Mr. Prince, Professors 
Antonoff and Weaver, UM/B. 



In the absence of Chairman Haigis, Trustee Crowley 
assumed the chair for this special meeting called for the purpose 
of further discussion of Space Program - UM/Boston at Columbia 
Point . Acting Chairman Crowley pointed out the difficulties in- 
volved in planning space requirements at Columbia Point: the fact 
that this will be essentially a commuter campus; the problems in- 
volved in achieving the proper balance between student body and 
space during the different stages of construction, and the fact that 
dining halls and other student activity areas cannot be self- 
liquidating. 

Trustee Pumphret speaking to the specific agenda - Space 
Programs - Buildings 010, 020 and 080 - asked for information on 
the number of swimming pools planned, the number of other facilities 
for physical activities, and the rationale for classrooms seating 
only 15 students. 

Chancellor Broderick replied that, since the meeting of 
the Buildings and Grounds Committee on January 8, the specifications 
had again been reviewed in terms of best possible utilization of 
space and funds. As a result, some changes have now been made in 
the original plans as sent to the Board. 

Mr. O'Brien noted that all space allocations had been 
made on the basis of flow charts. In some cases large classrooms 
had seemed preferable. Most of the changes, he said, had been based 
on comment and suggestions made at the Buildings and Grounds Com- 
mittee meetings of December and January. All planning has been 
done strictly within the framework of the budget allocation. The 
hostels, first discussed on September 12, 1969, were first reduced 
and now have been eliminated. Now the original concept of each 
college being a self-contained unit for student activities has been 
reappraised. The swimming pool in College 020 has been eliminated. 

Trustee Pumphret questioned the wisdom of building 
athletic facilities in individual buildings when long-range plans 
call for central athletic facilities including an Olympic-size 
pool. 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Mr. O'Brien replied that this has been a concern. The 
question of placement of eating facilities had also been debated. 
As cost is the same, whether or not centrally located, it has seemec 
sensible to provide eating facilities as needed, college by college 

Chancellor Broderick pointed out that 767» of the students 
have part-time jobs. The idea has been to provide them with easily 
accessible recreational facilities for between-class use. For this 
purpose, basketball and handball courts, a swimming pool, and a 
multi-use gymnasium which can be used for tennis are recommended. 

Mr. O'Brien gave the total estimate for building construc- 
tion as 86 million dollars for all buildings in first phase of con- 
struction. Square footage of space per student will fluctuate, 
starting out at more than 250 and dropping at times below 200. 
Classroom and laboratory space has been based on standard calcula- 
tions of faculty ratio. In the athletic area the basis for calcula 
tions is much less firm. Parking calculations were based on the 
master plan. A necessary change in the connecting tunnel may re- 
duce the number of levels in the plaza, but exteriors and placement 
of the buildings will remain the same. 

Trustee Pumphret raised the question of classroom size. 
Seventy-eight percent of classroom space is allocated to rooms hav- 
ing a seating capacity of 15 to 30 students. Mr. Littlefield noted 
that a maximum of 30 students per classroom would limit flexibility 
At Amherst, classrooms are planned for 30 - 60 students. Herter 
Hall, the newest classroom building, is programmed at 30. 

Trustee Knowles asked if movable partitions were feasible 
It was Mr. O'Brien's feeling that "movable partitions don't work." 

President Lederle pointed out that drastic changes in 
education could be expected in the near future. The trend now is 
toward larger classrooms with the possibility that a lecture hall 
seating 400 may be too small. 

Mr. O'Brien said that utilization studies at UM/B showed 
demand for more small classrooms and few extra large ones. He felt 
that, should the utilization rates change, that the partitions, be- 
ing steel-studded dry walls, would not be expensive to move. Pro- 
fessor Weaver noted the expectation of the UM/B planning staff that 
there will be 807, utilization of all seats in the 15-student class- 
rooms, with the larger ones being used less at the outset and more 
frequently later on. 

New summary sheets for buildings 010, 020, and 080 were 
distributed, showing the reductions in office space and student 
activity areas and the reduction of pool area to a single one - 
25' by 50' . 

There was general discussion of use of these facilities. 
Trustee Gordon expressed the opinion that this was not a realistic 
pool size. Chancellor Broderick said that the reduced area of the 
pool was not ideal, but that it was expected to have very heavy use. 



3453 



Classroom 
Size - 
Columbia 
Point 



3456 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Professor Weaver projected extremely heavy use for the basketball 
courts. Dean Gagnon pointed out that it was hoped to give students 
an opportunity to learn skills and sports for adult life and that 
the emphasis was not on team sports. As public tennis courts are 
almost non-existent in Boston, this would be the only opportunity 
for UM/ Boston students to learn the game. 

Chancellor Broderick pointed out that there was no legis- 
lative authorization for UM/Boston to build self-liquidating facili- 
ties. All facilities now planned for Phase I are included in the 
budget. 

It was emphasized by Professor Weaver that the space pro- 
grams as submitted to the Buildings and Grounds Committee had been 
approved by the UM/Boston Faculty Senate and the UM/Boston planning 
office, and that these programs had "the almost unanimous support" 
of the faculty. 

Trustee Knowles asked if the plans had been reviewed by 
representatives of the student body. Chancellor Broderick replied 
that the original plans had been drawn up by a sub-committee of 
faculty and students, but that students had not been involved in the 
most recent changes. Trustee Knowles referred to Trustee Olken's 
request, made at the meeting of this committee on January 8, that 
UM/Boston students be involved in future planning. The Chancellor 
pointed out that changes made in the initial plans, with which there 
had been student involvement, had not been substantial and had con- 
sisted largely of space reductions. 

Mr. O'Brien noted that the Master Plan, for the most part, 
calls for duplication of the colleges and dining halls, with the 
exception of the major athletic facilities - College One will have 
a pool, Colleges Two and Three will have gymnasiums. 

A presentation of the plans for Columbia Point is to be 
made for the students by Sasaki, Dawson, DeMay Associates on 
February 11, 1970. 



and 



After further general discussion, it was moved, seconded 



VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
the revised Space Programs for Columbia 
Point as detailed in the Space and Budget 
Summary Revisions of January 19, 1970 for 
Building 010 (Document T70-050) ; Building 
020 (Document T70-051) ; and Building 080 
(Document T70-052) (and based on complete 
building programs as contained in basic 
documents T70-063; T70-064; and T70-065) 
be approved. 



1 



COMMITTEE 



I 



II 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Regarding the acquisition of Parcel B, Columbia Point, 
Vice-Chancellor Hamilton said that a final opinion received from 
the Attorney General now advises a specific monetary award of 
$225,166.00. 

On motion made and seconded, it was then 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that, 
in accordance with Chapter 898, Item 7490- 
0102 of the Acts of 1969, and all other acts, 
authorizing the Trustees of the University 
to acquire land, or land with buildings 
thereon, by purchase or by eminent domain 
under Chapter 79 of the General Laws, for 
the development of the University of Massa- 
chusetts at Columbia Point in the City of 
Boston; independent appraisals having been 
made by qualified disinterested appraisers 
and filed with Vice-Chancellor William R. 
Hamilton, Jr. ; the Trustees of the Univer- 
sity take by eminent domain in fee, a parcel 
of land now or formerly owned by the City of 
Boston and designated as Parcel (B) on a plan 
entitled "Plan of Land in Boston, (Dorchester) 
Mass.," surveyed by New England Survey Ser- 
vices, Inc., October 6, 1969 (Document 
T70-027), and that the sum of $225,166.00 
be and hereby is awarded as damages for 
Parcel (B) , and that Robert J. McCartney, 
Secretary, Board of Trustees, is hereby 
authorized to sign the order of taking for 
and in the name of the Board of Trustees. 

Assistant Dean of Administration Gugin reviewed action 
recently taken by the Board of Higher Education. A capital outlay 
budget for Fiscal 1971 for 153 million dollars has been approved 
by the BHE, in addition to the 100 million dollar capital outlay 
request for UM/Boston. The $950,000 request for UM/Boston renova- 
tions at 100 Arlington Street will be included in the top 15 
priority items in a special deficiency request. 

The meeting was adjourned at 12:15 p.m. 





Robert J. McCartney, 
Secretary, Board of Trusl 




34 57 



Parcel (B) 

Columbia 

Point 



Board of 

Higher 

Education 

capital 

outlay 

budget 



345Tcu 



COMMITTEE 



Invitation 
Democratic 
State 
Committee 



Merit 

Increases - 
UM/A, UM/B, 
UM/W 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 
January 20, 1970, 2:00 p.m., Parlor C, Statler Hilton Hotel, Boston 



PRESENT : Chairman Healey, President Lederle; 
Trustees Gordon, Lyons, Pumphret, 
Troy; Treasurer Johnson, Secretary 
McCartney. 



ALSO 
PRESENT: 



Provost Tippo, Dean Gugin, Professors 
Burke, Korson, Morris, Roberts, Mrs. 
Hull, UM/A. Chancellor Broderick, 
Vice-Chancellor Hamilton, Dean Gagnon, 
Mr. O'Brien, Professor Weaver, UM/B. 
Dean Soutter, UM/W. 



The meeting was convened at 2:05 p.m. with President 
Lederle assuming the chair until the arrival of Chairman Healey at 
2:15 p.m. Discussion was held on the fourth agenda item - Invita - 
tion to the State Democratic Committee . President Lederle noted 
that, having prior authorization to proceed, the invitation to the 
Committee had been made. The necessity of having some damage in- 
surance coverage for large conventions to be held at the new Campus 
Center was discussed. There was general agreement that the Ad- 
ministration would arrange a further meeting with representatives of 
the Democratic State Committee to discuss details of convention 
arrangements. 

Returning to the first agenda item - Management Area - 
Merit Increases - Amherst, Boston, Worcester, Chairman Healey asked 
for comments from the members of the administration present. Presi- 
dent Lederle noted that the Executive Committee focuses on admini- 
strative merit increment recommendations while the Committee on 
Faculty and Educational Policy has focused on academic merit 
recommendations at their meeting of January 19, 1979. The President 
said that merit recommendations in the Management area had been 
carefully reviewed with the Treasurer and approval is recommended. 

Treasurer Johnson commented on the statistical studies 
which had been done as a basis for comparison of salary levels with 
other educational institutions as well as with other state services. 
In addition to the 12% cost of living pay raise for all state em- 
ployees voted by the Legislature, the House Ways and Means Committee 
has approved a list of upgradings (The Williams Report) which is 
retroactive to November 26, 1969. Three hundred upgradings are in- 
volved at UM/ Amherst, on which much comparative study has been done. 
In general, Treasurer Johnson said, administrative salaries are in 
the first 12% among all institutions, although many positions lag 
somewhat behind national medians. 

Trustee Pumphret noted that the Trustees had approved a 
4% merit increment a year ago in anticipation of a then expected 
state increase of 107o which turned out to be 127o. It was his 



345? £ 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

feeling that it would have been more realistic to base salary in- 
crement comparisons on salaries of the previous year. prior to the 
across-the-board increments. 

Trustee Troy expressed concern over the apparent "open- 
endedness" of the salary scale, even though this is within the con- 
text of inflation and an affluent society. 

After further discussion, it was moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees approval 

of the Merit Increases - Management Area 1970-71 - 
Amherst, Boston, Worcester, as detailed in 
Document T70-058. 

Chairman Healey next asked Dean Soutter to comment on the 
second agenda item - Medical School Tuition . The Dean expressed 
concern that the tuition fee had been set at a $600 rather than a 
$200 annual figure. It was the Dean's feeling, based on various 
statistical studies, that most medical students have exhausted 
family support before enrolling in medical school. Additionally, 
the average scholarship for a graduate student, he said, is $1500 
in contrast to the average medical school scholarship of about $500 
when available. Analysis done at the Boston University Medical 
School showed medical students working an average of 19 hours weekly 
at outside jobs, buying no clothes and eating frugally. Of the 
students accepted so far for the UM Medical School most have parents 
with low to average incomes and half have already applied for 
financial aid. 

Dean Soutter suggested that a detailed study of the 
financial needs of the UM Medical School entering class be under- 
taken and completed by April 1, 1970, when the figures for scholar 
ship support will be available. Dean Soutter proposed a reconsidera 
tion of the tuition at that, time. 

Trustee Pumphret observed that $200 "is simply not a 
realistic tuition figure." 

Chairman Healey pointed out that the students now expect 
the tuition fee of $600 and that many members of the Legislature 
think that $600 is too low. The Chairman also noted that new 
federal regulations for student loans have lowered the interest 
rate of 6% and raised the debt limit to $1450 annually. 

Dean Soutter stressed the fact that this is a unique 
opportunity to study the characteristics of a first entering class 
at a medical school. Trustee Troy observed that ideally, he would 
like to see no tuition, but with a general feeling in the Legisla- 
ture that $600 is not high enough, it would appear that $600 is a 
reasonable compromise. 

Chairman Healey pointed out the high income potential for 
graduates of the medical school, the relatively high cost of faculty 
in the school, and the great amount of money committed by the 



Medical 

School 

Tuition 



3^J"T^ 



COMMITTEE 



Faculty 
Membership. 
Board of 
Trustees 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Legislature to construct the school. In vie ^ of these factors, the 
$600 tuition charge for medical school education "is a great bar- 
gain." He noted that adequate scholarship aid must be provided. 

Chairman Healey added that Board action on tuition had 
reluctantly been taken during Dean Soutter's hospitalization and 
the absence of the President because it was the understanding of 
the Board at that time that a firm decision was needed in order not 
to delay student acceptances. 

President Lederle stated that the basic philosophy under- 
lying determination of in-state and out-of-state tuition up to now 
was not to exceed the national median. There is a question whether 
we should set an unduly low tuition fee for the medical school or 
adopt a tuition conforming to the national medical school average. 
He added that it was necessary to fight to keep tuition as low as it 
is, and that politically it would be "better to attack on the 
scholarship front," rather than stir up our enemies on the tuition 
front. 

There was general agreement that a financial capability 
study of the first medical school class, as suggested by Dean 
Soutter, would be useful and informative in any case. 

Representatives of the Faculty Senate, UM/A, were next 
introduced to the meeting for discussion of the third agenda item - 
Faculty Membership, Board of Trustees . Faculty members present 
were Professors Terence Burke, Henry Korson, Bruce Morris and John 
L. Roberts. 

Professor Korson, speaking initially for the group, re- 
ferred to the proposal made by Professor John Fenton who had been 
last year's Faculty Senate representative to the Board of Trustees. 
It is the feeling of the Faculty Senate in general, Professor 
Korson said, that the faculty could make a valuable contribution to 
the Board within the areas of their expertise. With a student 
trustee now on the Board, it is felt that it is only a question of 
time until the Governor acts to provide faculty membership on the 
Board of Trustees. This action, however, is probably a year or two 
in the future. The Faculty Senate proposes at this time that the 
formally designated representative of the Faculty Senate participate 
at all sessions of the Board including particularly meetings of the 
Committee on Faculty and Educational Policy and the Committee on 
Buildings and Grounds, without a vote and exclusive of executive 
sessions. Provost Tippo pointed out that faculty representatives 
have been attending meetings of both committees: for about three 
years. Currently, the representatives are: Professor Ulin to the 
Committee on Faculty and Educational Policy and Professor Zube, 
Chairman of the Master Planning Committee, to the Committee on 
Buildings and Grounds. 

Trustee Gordon also noted that one of the first things he 
had done as the recently appointed chairman of the Committee on 
Government and University Relations had been to ask the Faculty and 
Student Senates of all campuses to designate representatives to all 
meetings of his committee. 



II 



COMMITTEE 



1 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

President Lederle said that he had been asked by Senator 
Fonseca's committee to comment on the addition of a student to the 
Board of Trustees as proposed by the Governor. He responded that he 
felt that this would be changing the whole concept of the Board of 
Trustees to one of representing constituencies and that this con- 
cept should be adequately studied before proceeding on an ad hoc 
basis. The proposed course of action, the President indicated, 
would divide and change the Board into representatives of 
"clientele groups," a completely different philosophy of trustee- 
ship than at present. There may be good arguments for such a 
change, but it should not be done without a thorough review of what 
clientele groups deserve representation. It is patently absurd he 
indicated in his response to Senator Foseca to add a student 
trustee and ignore the equally significant faculty interest in hav- 
ing a trustee. 

It was agreed that a formalized statement of procedure on 
the matter of faculty representation would be worked out for pre- 
sentation to the Board. Provost Tippo will lend assistance. 

There was also a brief discussion by Professor Morris of 
the Faculty Senate UM/A Proposal on Faculty Participation in Uni- 
versity Governance which had been reviewed at the meeting of the 
Committee on Faculty and Educational Policy on January 19. The 
UM/Boston faculty statement has just been received and both can now 
be reviewed for final presentation to the Executive Committee. The 
Trustees expressed their appreciation to the faculty members who 
had appeared at this meeting to present these matters. 



Authorization for the Treasurer to Sign Contracts 
fourth agenda item was next present. 



the 



3-tSTeL 



Kenneth W. Johnson has been and is called upon in the 
normal course of his duties as Treasurer to execute contracts and 
other instruments for and in behalf of the Trustees of the Uni- 
versity of Massachusetts. The By-Laws of the Trustees, prior to 
the amendment that excluded the duties of the officers, contained 
broad powers authorizing the Treasurer to sign contracts and other 
instruments for the Trustees. 

While the Trustees have from time to time voted to 
authorize the Treasurer to execute specific types of instruments, 
the Trustees have not been asked to vote the general authorization 
formerly contained in the By-Laws to execute contracts and other 
instruments. The Treasurer has, of course, continued to sign re- 
pair and other construction contracts, equipment leases, research 
agreements, grants, service and other contracts. The Purchasing 
Policy adopted by the Trustees in 1962 also designated the Treasurer 
as the officer of the University to make purchases from any funds 
under the control of the University. 

The only problem that has been encountered is that the 
Secretary of the University is unable to provide a concise certifi- 
cate that the Treasurer has such authority. Occasionally such a 
Certificate of Vote is required. 



Authorization 
for 

Treasurer to 
Sign Contracts 



34J7 



-€-- 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

When the reorganization of the University is completed, 
others may require similar authorization. 

It was then moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees 
that Kenneth W. Johnson, Treasurer of 
the University of Massachusetts, be 
authorized to execute contracts and all 
other instruments for and in behalf of 
the Trustees of the University of Massa- 
chusetts as his duties as Treasurer may 
from time to time require him to so 
execute . 

One final item of business involved suggested title 
changes for the University system: designation of the head of the 
system as Chancellor and heads of the individual campuses as Presi- 
dents. After discussion, it was agreed that the titles as origi- 
nally proposed would remain unchanged, which would be in agreement 
with the majority of state university systems. 

The meeting was adjourned at 4:10 p.m. 




r 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 




II 




I 



3458 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON GOVERNMENT AND UNI- 
VERSITY RELATIONS 

January 23, 1970, 11:00 a.m., Parlor F, Statler Hilton Hotel, 

Boston 

PRESENT : Chairman Gordon, President Lederle; 
Trustee Troy; Treasurer Johnson, 
Secretary McCartney. 



ALSO 
PRESENT: 



From UM/A : Assistant Dean Gugin, 
Professor Irving Howards, Faculty 
Senate; Dawn Dudash, Student Senate; 
Bradford Whipple, Graduate Student 
Senate; Mrs. Hull. 

From UM/B : Chancellor Broderick, 
Vice-Chancellor Hamilton, Mr. Joseph 
Cass, Professor George Goodwin, 
Faculty Senate; Richard Hogan, 
Student Council. 



The meeting was convened at 11:20 a.m. As recently re- 
organized under Chairman Gordon, representatives of the Faculty and 
Student Senates of UM/ Amherst, UM/Boston and of the faculty of UM/ 
Worcester have been invited to attend all meetings of this committee 
and to participate in discussion. These delegates are to report 
back to their respective Senate groups on a regular basis. The 
Chairman welcomed Miss Dawn Dudash, representing the Student Senate, 
UM/A; Professor Irving Howards, Faculty Senate, UM/A; and Mr. 
Bradford Whipple, Graduate Student Senate UM/A. Present from 
UM/Boston were Professor George Goodwin of the Faculty Senate and 
Mr. Richard Hogan representing the Student Council. 

The Chairman urged a full and frank exchange of ideas amon| 
those present. He also expressed the hope that a wide involvement 
of members of the University community in mapping out a course of 
action for the future would develop as well as a better understand- 
ing of the problems facing the University. Mr. Gordon noted the 
possibility that it might be necessary at times, on sensitive matter$ 
to go into executive session involving only those persons who are 
members of the Board of Trustees. 

It was pointed out that Mr. Cass is deeply involved in 
labor relations as well as legislative matters. Assistant Dean of 
Administration David Gugin is primarily concerned with matters re- 
lated to the state government. It is likely that future effort will 
be made toward coordination on an organized basis with the federal 
government as well. 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Mr. Cass was requested to report on current legislation 
of interest to the University. Referring to the recent statement 
by the Governor that the budget had been balanced without new taxa- 
tion, he noted that severe cuts in some areas of state government 
would obviously be necessary and that "the budget is the number one 
problem." Some bills have been filed which are not reported on the 
list (attached) and there may be others for late filing. For the 
most part, the comments on each bill listed are self-explanatory, 
but additional comment on two bills follows: 

Also: Additional bill filed (not on list) : 

H3647 - Long of Westwood - To raise tuition 
at the University of Massachusetts 
to $500 annually. 

It is felt that there is fairly broad-based legislative 
support for this bill. 

H1201 - Bill establishing a special commission 
to study the establishment of an 
evening school at the University of 
Massachusetts . 
(Education) Hearing Date - March 11 

President Lederle expressed agreement with the intent of 
H1201 but noted that financial support had not been available for 
this purpose in the past. It was his feeling that evening classes 
should be provided at the University of Massachusetts. To do so, 
however, it will be necessary to set a higher tuition fee per 
course than that now charged. This increase in fees would cover 
administrative overhead and make the program self-liquidating. 

H288 - (Serlin) - To prohibit the admission 

of out-of-state or foreign students to 
the University of Massachusetts or any 
State College unless there are no quali- 
fied applicants from the Commonwealth. 
(Education) Hearing Date - April 1 

There was considerable discussion of H288. It was felt 
that the implications are serious. These restrictions, if applied, 
would eliminate almost all sources of government financial aid for 
the medical school. With the current admissions policy of main- 
taining a 95-5 percent ratio of in-state to out-of-state students, 
the University of Massachusetts now has the close to lowest per- 
centage of out-of-state students of any state university in America 
at the undergraduate level. Massachusetts exports twice as many 
students to public institutions in other states as it imports to 
its own public institutions and other states are threatening to 
stop taking Massachusetts students unless Massachusetts eases up on 
out-of-state admissions. 



3459 



Report - 
Legislation 
Current 
Session 



3460 



COMMITTEE 




Guidelines - 
BHE Task Force 
on Fiscal 
Responsibili- 
ties 

BHE - 

Summary 

Role 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

There was general agreement that it would be desirable to 
have a higher proportion of students from outside Massachusetts than 
is now the case. It was also pointed out that, on the basis of 
qualifications, higher standards are now set for out-of-state appli- 
cants and, in the case of equal qualifications for given candidates 
for admission, a Massachusetts candidate has preference. 

It was proposed to place this matter, which is a problem 
nationally, before the National Association of State Universities 
and Land-Grant Colleges for study. President Lederle, who is a 
member of the Executive Committee of the Land-Grant Association, 
agreed to place this matter on the Committee's agenda for the 
February meeting. 



After further discussion, and on motion made and seconded. 



it was 



VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
the matter of out-of-state student quotas 
be referred to the Executive Committee of 
the National Association of State Univer- 
sities and Land-Grant Colleges with a re- 
quest that the Association embark on a study. 

At the conclusion of Mr. Cass 1 legislative report, the 
meeting was adjourned for lunch at 12:45 p.m., reconvening at 
1:45 p.m. 

Dean Gugin, commenting on his memorandum of January 15, 
1970 re the report on the guidelines recommended by the BHE Task 
Force on Fiscal Responsibility, said that this is too complex a 
matter on which to give a cogent and useful analysis at this time. 
He will report at a later date. 

At the request of Chairman Gordon, President Lederle 
summarized the role of the Board of Higher Education. Noting that 
"there obviously isn't enough money to go around," the President 
said, the BHE attempts to reduce competition among segments of the 
state system of higher education and to create an educationally 
oriented and objective climate for cooperation. The role of the 
BHE is advisory rather than coercive, although the BHE has the power 
to approve new programs. Although the BHE does not exercise control 
over budgetary matters, it does comment. (BHE comments, for in- 
stance, could result in reduction of a poorly planned budget.) 
The BHE has another major role, that of prime developer of the 
state's master plan for higher education. The President noted that, 
although the University has no wish to dominate the state system of 
higher education, there are some areas in which the BHE does request 
University assistance. 

President Lederle expressed pride in the relationship of 
the University to the State Community College system. As an example 
of the cooperation existing, President Lederle noted that graduates 



3461 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

of Community Colleges are accepted at the University on certifica- 
tion of qualification by the Community College. This is not the 
case in all state systems. 

At this point, Secretary McCartney, who was attending the 
concurrent session of the Trustee Ad Hoc Presidential Search 
Committee, joined the meeting at the request of Chairman Gordon. 

The Chairman noted that the University now ranks among 
the top twenty-five institutions of higher learning in the country 
in terms of enrollment and thus is approaching "big league" status. 
Mr. Gordon outlined a proposal for a broad plan involving Univer- 
sity service to the Commonwealth, particularly to municipal govern- 
ments. Such a program would serve a reciprocal purpose, inasmuch 
as public relations benefits would accrue to the University. 

In many of the 351 cities and towns of the Commonwealth, 
Chairman Gordon said, the heads of local governments are struggling 
with an increasing load of social and environmental problems such 
as pollution, housing, taxation and budgetary problems; racial 
tensions, and the need to revise local governmental structures add 
to the burden. Expert resource assistance is not usually available 
Mr. Gordon proposed establishment of a University Institute of 
Public Service, or Bureau of Public Affairs which would offer ser- 
vice to municipalities on three levels: teaching, research and 
service. 

Secretary McCartney commented that implementation of 
such a program would certainly strengthen the University's public 
relations posture in the Commonwealth; also, that Dean Picha in 
Engineering was deeply interested in the development of "outreach" 
service programs. However, the problem of funding and adequate 
personnel to cover the activity immediately comes to the fore. 

Professor Goodwin asked if the proposed services would 
be on a municipal basis only or on a state basis as well. The 
Chairman felt that while aid to the state would not be ruled out, 
the concept was primarily a program of municipal aid, although 
there could possibly be a dual packaging. 

Trustee Troy commented on the current efforts at UM/Bostoi 
in the development of a Department of Black Studies as being one 
part of the "urban scene," and part of the mandate of the urban 
university concept in community service. 

Treasurer Johnson observed that much activity along the 
lines of public service is now taking place at the University. 

Recognizing the particular expertise of Professor Howards 
former Director of the Bureau of Government Research at the Uni- 
versity, Chairman Gordon asked for his evaluation of the proposal, 
Professor Howards endorsed the concept but added that his experienc 



Proposal - 
University 
Program of 
Public Service 



346', 



■>. 



COMMITTEE 



Committee - 
Enlargement of 
University 1 s 
Program of 
Public Service 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

in other states had shown that actual progress in such a program is 
difficult without adequate financial backing. Professor Howards 
noted other problems such as staffing and base of operations. The 
people involved should be faculty members and yet "faculty members 
do not usually receive financial rewards for this kind of activity." 
As for location, Professor Howards felt that University-based opera- 
tion would probably not be practical, but the people involved in 
such activities should not be isolated from the academic environ- 
ment. Professor Howards agreed, however, that the proposal should 
definitely be studied. 

Vice-Chancellor Hamilton observed that action rather than 
study was needed. He proposed finding people with this kind of 
dedication and taking the necessary steps to provide financial 
support. The appointment of a director would be the first step. 

President Lederle observed that "topside backing is abso- 
lutely essential." Otherwise, he said, service units get a low 
priority when competing with academic units for budget allocations 
within the university structure. From one viewpoint, President 
Lederle said, this new agency, if formed, should report directly to 
the president of the system to assure its public relations potential 
while from another viewpoint, it might be detrimental to separate it 
from the academic environment of a campus and close association with 
academic colleagues. At this point, President Lederle had to leave 
for another appointment. 

After further discussion, general agreement was expressed 
by those present for the essential need for enlargement of the Uni- 
versity's program of public service, insofar as it could be de- 
veloped from University resources. Chairman Gordon named a committed 
to conduct a six-month study of possible establishment of such a 
program. Serving on the committee are Professor Goodwin, Professor 
Howards, Dean Gugin, Vice-Chancellor Hamilton and Secretary 
McCartney. Professor Howards is to serve as Chairman. The committee 
is to give a progress report in April. 

Chairman Gordon expressed appreciation of the interest 
shown by the faculty and student representatives present and for 
their contributions during the course of the discussion. 



The meeting was adj 




iobert J. McCarJt 
Sedeetary, Board oi 



ey 
Trustees 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON FINANCE 

February 4, 1970, 11:00 a.m., Room 434, Statler Hilton Hotel, Boston 

PRESENT : Chairman Pumphret, Trustees Frechette, 
Gordon, Knowles, Sweig; Treasurer 
Johnson, Secretary McCartney. 



ALSO 
PRESENT: 



From UM/A : Mr. Brand, Mr. Maus ; Professor 

Ludtke for the Faculty Senate; Mrs. Hull. 
From UM/B : Chancellor Broderick, Vice- 
Chancellor Hamilton. 
From Standish, Ayer & Wood, Inc. , Mr . Ladd . 

Chairman Pumphret convened the meeting at 11:15 a.m. 
Mr. Ladd, of Standish, Ayer & Wood, Inc., Investment Counselors, 
presented the Report of Investment Counsel. Mr. Ladd noted the 
tight money situation and the lower corporate profits which have re- 
sulted in a fairly substantial decline in stock prices. However, he 
said, higher earnings in 1970 are anticipated and the current 
situation is not viewed with great concern. 

Either federal agencies or prime commerical paper is 
recommended for short-term investment of Operating Funds. These 
offer, Mr. Ladd, said, flexibility in choosing maturity dates, 
attractive yields at 8%7», and several options as to quality. The 
federal agencies, serving a public function, are considered to be 
"as good as Treasury Bills." In selection of prime commerical paper, 
Mr. Ladd urged investment in only the highest quality available - 
corporations considered for investment should have a "prime" agency 
rating and should have in addition a public bond rating of AA or 
AAA. 

Regarding the Savings Bank Deposits of approximately 
$250,000 which will be available on March 15, 1970, Mr. Ladd 
recommended that Treasurer Johnson purchase, at his discretion, 
either seasoned federal agencies or prime commerical paper, with a 
suggested maturity date of mid-1976. 

The recommendation made by Mr. Ladd for the Variable 
Interest Account is that investment be made in prime commerical 
paper with diversification. This would allow spacing of maturity 
dates and would produce an average yield of 8.50%. 

Trustee Pumphret raised the question of short-term vs. 
long-term investments. In particular, Trustee Pumphret thought that 
the possibility of long-term investment of the $250,000 in Savings 
Bank Balances which will become available March 15, 1970 should be 
considered. Trustee Gordon agreed, and stated the view that thought 
should be given to increasing long-term investments in the future. 



3463 



Report 
Investment 
Counsel - 
Operating 
Fund 



3464 



COMMITTEE 



Policy - 
Off-Campus 
Program Fee 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Mr. Ladd noted in this connection, the availability of 
Federal Land Bank and Treasury bonds, as well as prime industrial 
utility bonds all yielding over 87o. Treasurer Johnson agreed that 
more long-term investments could be made in the future. 

In response to Vice-Chancellor Hamilton's question as to 
the source of funds held in the Variable Interest Account, 
Treasurer Johnson stated that these funds represent hundred of 
accounts containing balances in excess of current needs and also 
interest derived from trust funds. 

Vice-Chancellor Hamilton asked if investment earnings of 
the type being discussed were unrestricted funds. Treasurer 
Johnson replied that these funds are unrestricted but actually go 
into trust funds, which in tern are budgeted into specific accounts, 
many of which are of a repetitive nature (for instance, support of 
the research computer.) Additionally, the Treasurer said, reserves 
are used to avoid bank service charges, through maintenance of mini- 
mum bank balances. 

Vice-Chancellor Hamilton requested that UMass/Boston 
participate in future budget planning sessions for unrestricted in- 
come. Trustee Frechette and Trustee Gordon expressed agreement 
with the Vice-Chancellor's position. Trustee Frechette stated the 
opinion that the administration would probably also agree. Chair- 
man Pumphret also concurred stating that, while this matter was not 
properly before the committee, it seemed a reasonable request. 

Treasurer Johnson is investigating the establishment of a 
Savings Account in the New Bedford-Fall River area. 

After further discussion, it was moved, seconded, and 

VOTED : To authorize the Treasurer of the University, 
Kenneth W. Johnson, to make the investments 
in the University's operating fund as 
recommended by Standish, Ayer & Wood, Inc., 
and contained in Document T70-071, which 
document is hereby attached to and made a 
part of these minutes. 

The Policy on Off-Campus Program Fee was next discussed. 
This policy, as submitted by Assistant Dean of Administration 
Venman has been reviewed and informally approved by the Faculty 
Senate and the Deans' Council. 

PROPOSED POLICY ON OFF-CAMPUS PROGRAM FEE 

The Off-Campus Program fee is assessed of participants 
in off-campus programs in lieu of the Health, Athletic, 
Student Union and Activities Fees. Excepted is the 
Identification Card Fee, which all students must pay. 
In addition, students must be cautioned that failure 
to pay the Health Fee in the fall semester makes them 



1 



COMMITTEE 



I 



I 



3465 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

ineligible to take part in the supplemental health in- 
surance program for the entire year and that failure to 
pay this fee during any given semester makes the many 
benefits of the University Health Services, including 
the Mental Health Service, unavailable to them for that 
semester. 

Off-campus programs are defined as full-time academic 
programs designed for individuals or groups with a 
minimum duration of one semester and part of the 
regular degree programs of the University based and 
housed off campus which do not normally make use of 
University facilities. Students who take part in off- 
campus programs who are housed and/or fed on the campus 
are not eligible for fee assessment under this policy. 

The off-campus program fee is based upon the bonded 
indebtedness portions of the replaced fees, and is 
established each year by the Treasurer of the Uni- 
versity. 

Off -campus program directors or advisors of students 
in programs designed for individuals are specifically 
responsible for registration of the programs with the 
Office of the Treasurer. Participants in unregistered 
programs will be assessed all fees and no rebate will 
be possible because of the prior commitment of income 
anticipated from such fees. A program director may 
ascertain the eligibility of participants in his pro- 
gram for assessment of fees under this policy by con- 
tacting the Office of the Treasurer. To be certain 
of eligibility for assessment under this policy, pro- 
gram directors must notify the Office of the Treasurer 
of their program and the number of participants far 
enough in advance of the beginning of the fiscal year 
in which the program is to occur to allow the calcu- 
lation of the impact of the assessment of the fee 
upon the budgets of the trust fund units affected. 
This is normally no later than October 15 of the 
preceding fiscal year. Exceptions to the registra- 
tion date may be granted by the Treasurer for compell- 
ing reasons. 

After general discussion, it was moved, seconded, and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
the Policy on Off-Campus Program Fees be 
approved. 

The Quarterly Financial Summary of the Treasurer was pre- 
sented by Treasurer Johnson for the period July 1, 1969 to December 
31, 1969. 

The UMass/Amherst (page 1) it was particularly noted that 
the July 1, 1969 deficit of $1,800,000 in subsidiary account 01 has 



Treasurer ' s 
Quarterly 
Report - 
July 1, 1969 ■ 
Dec. 31, 1969 



3466 



COMMITTEE 



Subsidiary 
Accounts - 
UM/ Amherst 



Subsidiary 
Accounts - 
UM/ Bos ton 



Waiver of 
Tuition - 
Personnel 
Water Resources 
Commission 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

been erased by successful enforcement of the freeze on positions, 
and that this account will be in balance for the fiscal year. 

For UMass/Boston, Vice-Chancellor Hamilton noted that the 
projected deficit (page 1) of $300,000 in subsidiary account 01 has 
been reduced to $200,000 and that Commissioner Shepard has been 
notified of the deficit. 

Treasurer Johnson called attention to certain transfers 
to be made at this time. After discussion it was moved, seconded, 
and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
authorization be granted to the Treasurer 
to make the following transfers between 
subsidiary accounts at Amherst: 

Account 02 Adjustment by Journal Voucher of 
payments from 02 to 01. The sum of $152,344.00 
will be adjusted to fund positions made perma- 
nent under 01. The State Comptroller will be 
requested to make this adjustment. 

From Account 01 to Account 03 the sum of 
$20,000.00 for student labor. 

From Account 01 to Account 03 the sum of 
$690,080.00 to fund Graduate Teaching 
Assistants in lieu of 01 positions. 

It was also 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
authorization be granted to the Treasurer 
to make the following transfers between 
subsidiary accounts at UM/Boston: 

Account 03 : Adjustment by Journal Vouncher of 
payments from 02 to 01. The sum of $63,852.00 
will be adjusted to fund positions made perma- 
nent under 01. The State Comptroller will be 
requested to make this adjustment. 

Treasurer Johnson presented a request for waiver of tuition 
for employees of the Massachusetts Water Resources Commission. This 
policy would be similar to policies passed earlier by the Board, 
particularly the policy relating to employees of Public Health 
passed in 1959. 

PROPOSED TRUSTEE POLICY ON WAIVER OF TUITION FOR EMPLOYEES 
OF THE MASSACHUSETTS WATER RESOURCES COMMISSION 

Employees of the Division of Water Pollution Control, 
Massachusetts Water Resources Commission, who are 
assigned to the campus of the University of Massachusetts 



n 



COMMITTEE 



| 



I 
I 



3467 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

may be eligible to take courses at the University and 
have tuition waived if, in the judgment of the Provost, 
the employee has participates significantly in the 
educational program of University students. 

After general discussion it was moved, seconded, and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 

the Policy on Waiver of Tuition for Employees 
of the Massachusetts Water Resources Com- 
mission be approved. 

This being the final item of business to come before the 
committee, the meeting was adjourned at 12:45 p.m. 




Robert /J. McCartney 
Secretary, coard of Trustee 



3468 



COMMITTEE 



Review - 
Master Plan 
Development 
Notebook - 
Columbia 
Point 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF COMMITTEE ON BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS 

February 12, 1970 

Lunch: 12:30 p.m., Forum Room, Sheraton Plaza Hotel 

Boston 
Meeting: 2:00 p.m., Bureau of Building Construction, 

711 Boylston Street 

PRESENT : Chairman Haigis, President Lederle; 
Trustees Crowley, Knowles, Maginnis, 
Pumphret; Secretary McCartney. 



I 



ALSO 
PRESENT: 



Associate Treasurer Brand, Planning 

Officer Littlefield, UM/A 

Chancellor Broderick, Vice-Chancellor 

Hamilton, Planning Officer O'Brien, UM/B 

Edmund MacAdam, Project Director, BBC; 

Ronald Rabin, Consultant, BBC 

Messrs. Perkins, Mosk, Stollman and Miss 

Doran of McKee-Berger-Mansueto 



The meeting was called to order by Chairman Haigis at 
2:07 p.m. Vice-Chancellor Hamilton was requested to comment on 
Agenda Item Two: Review of Master Plan Development Notebook (includ- 
ing changes ) - UM/B 



I 



The Vice-Chancellor requested that the committee give its 
approval to the Master Plan Development Notebook for the UM/B 
Columbia Point campus, observing that it had not been distributed 
because of its size; also, the Trustees are familiar with all data 
contained therein. 

In response to query from Trustee Pumphret, it was noted 
that the architects are approximately forty percent complete on 
schematics . 



After further brief discussion, it was moved, seconded, 



and 



VOTEB : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
the Master Plan Development Notebook for 
UM/Boston at Columbia Point, Document 
T70-076, which document is herewith attached 
to and made a part of these minutes, be 
approved. 

Mr. Rabin commented that the entire project at Columbia 
Point should take five months longer than is presently allowed, so 
the construction schedule will be extremely tight. 



' 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

At this point, Mrs. Ruth Morrison, Mrs. Sandy Young, and 
Mr. William Englehardt of the Columbia Point Action and Planning 
Council arrived, and the discussion moved to consideration of 
Agenda Item One: Columbia Point Action Committee . 

Mrs. Young commented on the virtues of Columbia Point as 
a site for the University; also, on the strong sense of community 
and pride felt by residents of the adjacent housing development. 

Both Mrs. Young and Mr. Engelhardt commented on the emo- 
tional ties to the land at Columbia Point felt by the area resi- 
dents, despite the fact that the land had once been a dump for the 
City of Boston. Mr. Engelhardt recited the long struggle of the 
residents to keep dump trucks from driving through the housing 
area until, finally, a child was killed. Finally, the City of 
Boston closed the dump. The feeling of the local residents is 
that Columbia Point is '.'land they have fought for." Mr. 
Englehardt also expressed concern for the safety of children play- 
ing on Columbia Point even though he indicated that very few young 
people used the site. 

General feeling was expressed by the Action Group repre- 
sentatives that the Buildings and Grounds Committee and the ad- 
ministration at UM/Boston had been somewhat remiss in failing, to 
date, to involve the members of the Columbia Point Planning and 
Action Council in development of programs and facilities for the 
University's UM/Boston campus. Chancellor Broderick responded 
that both he and his wife had visited with this group twice to 
date; Planning Officer O'Brien has been down there at least three 
times, and that the traffic access plans are largely an outgrowth 
of discussions held between University officials and members of 
the Columbia Point Council. 

The Chancellor stated that Mr. Claude Weaver has not been 
appointed to relate to the community, and to Columbia Point in 
particular. 

Mrs. Young responded that someone from Columbia Point 
should be named to a liaison post with the UM/Boston administration 
The Chancellor responded that he assumed that Mrs. Young and Mr. 
Engelhardt were the appropriate persons. Further discussion, how- 
ever, showed that Mrs. Young considers herself to be a staff per- 
son; she prefers to have someone from the Columbia Point Council 
itself designated for liaison purposes. Chancellor Broderick 
agreed, and urged her to designate someone. 

A further request was made by the Council representatives 
that they wished to participate in monthly meetings with the 
planning group for Columbia Point in order to maintain "appropriate 
liaison." Trustee Maginnis queried whether such involvement could 
be meaningful at this stage of progress. 



3469 



Columbia 
Point 
Action 
Council 



3470 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Discussion turned to use of the Recreation Field in the 
area set aside for Columbia Point residents by the Parks and 
Recreation Commission. Planning Officer O'Brien commented that this 
had not been taken into consideration. However, Mrs. Young observed 
that there was no reason why a joint use of the facility could not 
be scheduled, and "this is how a partnership grows." 

On the question of hazards to children playing at 
Columbia Point, Vice-chancellor Hamilton stated that he would be 
happy to work out with Mrs. Young the best method of approaching 
this problem. 

Mr. Engelhardt commented that we need to know "what is an 
urban university?" He mentioned also certain "trade-offs" that he 
claimed would interest and benefit the University of Massachusetts 
at Boston; however, he was not specific. 

Further questions were raised by Mr. Engelhardt concern- 
ing the nature of planning for tutorial programs, athletic planning, 
and the question of representation on the Buildings and Grounds 
Committee by someone from the Council who would have voting 
privileges. The question of transportation and the "Sky-Bus" was 
raised, particularly with regard to access for Columbia Point resi- 
dents. The possibility of negotiating with the MTA for partial 
financing of this project was mentioned. 

Mrs. Young commented on a program now active between the 
Columbia Point residents and the Graduate School of Boston Univer- 
sity. The BU students work with the Columbia Point youngsters. A 
program also exists with Regis College at the adult level providing 
high school equivalency courses in college preparation, typing, 
English, etc. President Lederle noted that, for some time, he had 
been advocating a similar orientation for UM/Boston as an urban 
University. 

Mr. Engelhardt observed that future serious problems might 
be avoided by having representatives of the Columbia Point Council, 
the Trustees, and the members of the administration at UM/Boston 
"get together now." 

Chairman Haigis, in summing up, stated that there was a 
mutual desire by staff representatives at UM/Boston and members of 
the Columbia Point Action group to establish liaison on planning the 
campus as well as other programs which might lead to tutorial 
arrangements in the future. The consensus was that the Chancellor 
would get together with representatives of the Council and work 
things out on the basis of common agreement. It had been decided 
earlier that UM/Boston representatives would visit Columbia Point 
to communicate with members of the Action Council. 

The representatives of the Columbia Point Area Planning 
and Action Council left the meeting. 



COMMITTEE 



I 



I 



Three: 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

The committee turned to consideration of Agenda Item 
Schedule for Design and Construction of Buildings, UM/B , 



Mr. Rabin repeated with emphasis his comments on the tight time- 
table on the Project Schedule. He stated that the timetable could 
be met only if full cooperation is received from the Committee on 
Buildings and Grounds and the Board of Trustees. For example, on 
March 5, all schematic designs will go to the Bureau of Building 
Construction and will be reviewed next day by Planning Officer 
O'Brien. It is imperative that they move to the Committee on 
Buildings and Grounds on March 6, and then to the full Board of 
Trustees for the meeting of March 13, 1970. 

Similarly, on April 14, the architects will present 
schedules to Planning Officer O'Brien, and these should be approvec 
by the Committee on Buildings and Grounds on April 15, after which 
they will go to the Board of Trustees on April 22. Prompt approval 
at all of these check points must be made in order to keep the 
project on schedule. 

Mr. Rabin added that he expects physical site work to 
commence in April, with contract documents available in June for 
the BBC and the University. 

In conclusion, Mr. Rabin observed that the project calls 
for construction of six buildings in two years, a schedule that 
would normally take three years. Prior to Board of Trustee approve 
he said, preliminary review will be necessary, and Dean Belluschi 
has been hired to represent the University in this matter. 

The committee next proceeded to Agenda Item Four: 
Review of Architectural Work completed by February 12 . This phase 
of the meeting consisted of an inspection of schematics and models 
of the Columbia Point Project on display in the Project Office. 

The inspection having been completed, the committee re- 
turned to the BBC Project Office Conference Room to consider 
Agenda Item Six: Student Room Rates - UM/A . 

President Lederle reported on an open meeting of the 
Student Senate held Wednesday evening, February 11, and devoted 
mainly to the proposed room rent rise. He noted that Associate 
Treasurer Brand had responded in a hostile atmosphere to student 
questions for more than three hours and had done an excellent job. 
Additionally, the President reported that the Student Senate had: 

1. Voted the sum of $500 to hire an outside 
accounting firm to review and confirm the 
University's cost projections related to 
the proposed room rent increase. 

2. Appointed a committee to list alternatives. 



3471 



Schedule for 
Design and 
Construction 
of Buildings 
UM/Boston 



- 



Review - 
Architectural 
Work Com- 
pleted by 
Feb. 12, 1970 

Student 
Room Rates 
UM/ Amherst 



3472 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Trustee Pumphret commented that the real trouble with 
respect to room rates is not the interest rates, but rather the 
tremendous cost of maintenance and service, the so-called M&O 
(Maintenance and Operations) portion of the costs. 

President Lederle observed that charges should be made for 
occupancy of University residence halls by the Health Department; 
also, for occupancy in Arnold House by members of the University 
staff. He urged an increase in 03 funds so that students can be 
employed in greater numbers to ease the financial burden, and 
recommended that the Commonwealth assume that costs of heat, light 
and power in the dormitories. 

Discussion in depth followed concerning the breakdown of 
maintenance and operating costs in Project One versus costs in the 
other University Building Authority Projects. Trustee Pumphret con- 
cluded that the University should confer with the Governor and 
legislative leadership to make clear that "the burden of carrying 
maintenance and operations costs in University residence halls by 
the student body is too great a load, especially when the students 
are paying for the dormitory buildings themselves." 

Planning Officer Littlefield noted that the rising cost of 
construction itself had added a considerable factor to the problem, 
and that this should not be overlooked. 

Trustee Pumphret expressed his opinion that there should 
be a uniform room rent across the campus, with some occupancy 
formula worked out whereby seniors or students with a high achieve- 
ment record might get first choice on space, or some other equitable 
plan devised. 

Mr. Brand noted that there had been a 5TL increase for 
debt service on Projects One to Twelve, reflected in last year's 
cost breakdown, apart from everything else that had been mentioned. 

It was agreed that Agenda Item Five: Presentation of 
Married Student Housing Project - UM/A would be postponed. 



Mr. 



Littlefield simply reported that the contract for site work had been 
awarded to Jackson and Harrington and to Fontaine Brothers who had 
submitted a bid 257o below that of other constuction bidders. 

Agenda Item Seven: Review of Architectural Plans - Medica 
Science Building - UM/W was also postponed due to the fact that 



Dr. Soutter indicated that the architects would not be available for 
the presentation. 

The meeting was adjourned at 4:15 p.m. 




Secret 



COMMITTEE 



I 



I! 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON GOVERNMENT AND 
UNIVERSITY RELATIONS 

February 26, 1970, 4:00 p.m., Conference Room, UM/ Boston 

PRESENT : Chairman Gordon, President Lederle; 
Trustee Troy; Treasurer Johnson. 



ALSO 
PRESENT: 



From UM/A : Associate Provost Gluckstern, 
Assistant Dean Gugin, Mr. Morrell, Mrs. 
Hull; Professors Howards, Faculty Senate; 
Dawn Dudash, Student Senate; Bradford 
Whipple, Graduate Student Senate. 
From UM/B : Vice-Chancellor Hamilton, 
Mr. Cass; Christy Kosta, Student Council. 
From UM/W : Dean Soutter, Mr. Stockwell. 



The meeting was convened by Chairman Gordon at 4:10 p.m. 
The main agenda item under discussion was the University Budget for 
Fiscal Year 1970-1971. 



For the benefit of new members of the committee, the 
Chairman outlined the timetable and framework within which the 
budget is presented to the Governor for his recommendations, and 
the procedures involved in requesting changes in appropriations. 
Urgent budgetary problems may be discussed with the Governor and 
the Commissioner of Administration and Finance, and deficiency and 
supplemental budget requests may be submitted. Hearings are held 
by the Ways and Means Committees of the State Legislature before 
final appropriations are made. It was stressed that timing of re- 
quests for increases in appropriations is critical, and that re- 
quests had at times been "too late" in the past. 

Chairman Gordon noted the continuing conflict in timing 
between the state fiscal system and the schedules of academic in- 
stitutions within the state. He expressed the hope that better 
correlation between academic year schedules and state fiscal year 
procedures might be possible in the future. Many decisions, such 
as those involving student enrollment, faculty commitments, and 
academic programs, must now be made in advance of knowledge of 
actual budget appropriations. 

President Lederle noted the areas of special concern with 
in the Governor's recommended budget for the University system: 
possible problems in the Medical School area, and in support of 
Special Programs UM/ Amherst. At UM/Boston, the President said, a 
clearer budgetary picture has emerged than has been possible in the 
past . 

The areas of greatest concern at UM/Amherst are (1) the 
Disadvantaged Student Program, (2) Scholarship and Work Study, and 
(3) Library Books. 



3473 



University 
Budget for 
Fiscal Year 
1970-1971 



Budget 
UM/Amherst 



3474 



COMMITTEE 



Law School 

UM/ Amherst 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

For support of the Disadvantaged Student Program UM/A, 
$750,000 was requested and $450,000 recommended by the Governor. 
This appropriation is $150,000 above that for the current year but 
will not meet the needs of the expanded program. 

In the area of Scholarship and Work Study, the President 
noted a decline in federal support and an increase in student 
activity and rent fees, which is expected to result in financial 
problems for some two-thirds of the student body. The appropriation 
for Scholarship and Work Study is divided between the Amherst and 
Boston campuses at a 75/25 ratio. $1,290,100 was requested for 
this purpose and $850,000 recommended. The recommended amount is 
the same as the allocation for the current year although UM/ Amherst 
will enroll 1500 additional students in 1970-1971 and UM/Boston 
will enroll 500 additional students for the same period. 

For Library Support, $1,200,000 was requested for books 
and $200,000 (the same amount as the current appropriation) 
recommended. It was emphasized that funds for the purchase of 
library books should be included in the operating budget rather than 
in special program allocations. 

The President noted additionally that support for new 
programs in the Governor's recommended budget is practically non- 
existent. 

Trustee Troy raised the question of the future of the 
Ocean Engineering Program, which has been started "on a shoestring." 
This program, the President noted, would be of great interest to 
scientific groups, who would probably initiate action to point out 
its importance to the state and to research, in requesting its fund- 
ing- 
Commenting on the establishment of a Law School at UM/ 
Amherst, President Lederle noted that "this proposal has been 
approved by the BHE. He stated the opinion that "it is time to act, 
and that the Board need not await legislative authorization. The 
Law School could be started by allocating some of the new positions 
under the 15-1 ratio for that purpose instead of assigning all new 
positions to existing programs. 

Associate Provost Gluckstern reviewed the situation for 
UM/ Amherst on the overall budget recommendations. 

He noted these priorities in the area of Special Programs: 

1. Disadvantaged Student Program . 

2. Scholarship and Work Study - Need for increased 

state aid to offset reduced federal funds. It 
was pointed out that scholarship aid is 
practically non-existent as state funds go 
primarily to match federal funds for work study. 

3. Library books . 



II 



COMMITTEE 



II 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

4. Instructional Computer Center - This, it was 

noted, is an item of continuing cost which 
should be funded on a continuing basis and 
not as a special program. 

5 . Research and Instructional Equipment . 

The following priorities have been established in the 
Basic Maintenance Budget: 

1. Equipment - $351,555 short of required funds 

2. Maintenance and Repairs - $331,405 short of 

required funds 

3. Rentals - $885,185 short of required funds 

Reviewing figures for the Medical School, Mr. Stockwell 
noted that the total request for the Medical School had been 
$2,664,653, which had been reduced to $1,632,205. The Equipment - 
15 Account of the Basic Maintenance Budget has been reduced by 
$600,760. It is hoped that this amount will be restored in the 
Capital Outlay appropriation. 

Mr. Stockwell noted an increase in Medical School 
personnel - to 80 persons by next year. 

Vice-Chancellor Hamilton expressed particular concern 
over the question of scholarship aid for the Boston campus. He 
also forecast a "solid deficiency" for the following accounts: 



11 - Advertising & Printing 
14 - Office & Admin. Expense 



16 - Rentals 



$7,000 

$15,000 (Additional 
telephone expense 
due to use of two 
additional buildings) 

(Will balance if 
only one building 
is rented) 



As special items Vice-Chancellor Hamilton noted that it 
will be an absolute necessity to establish contracts for equipment 
maintenance in another year for the Science Department - an item 
cut this year; and, it is hoped that the Governor will restore the 
funds cut out of the Operating Budget, particularly the $494,000 
requested for Research and Instructional Equipment in the Special 
Programs request. 

Chairman Gordon summarized the overall budget situation 
as being a minimum budget necessitating additional requests through 
supplemental and deficiency requests. 



3475 



Budget - 
UM/Worcester 



Budget - 
UM/ Boston 



3476 



COMMITTEE 



Legislative 
Report 



Report of 
Committee on 
Program of 
Public Service 
to Municipali- 
ties 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

At the suggestion of Chairman Gordon there was discussion 
of the formation of a small committee - probably not over six per- 
sons - for each campus consisting of the President, the Chancellors, 
and student representatives, to request an early meeting with the 
Governor, if possible, to discuss the areas of concern in the 
budget appropriations. It was felt that such small groups could 
discuss budget problems more informatively and effectively than 
larger unstructured groups. If the Governor proves unavailable, 
Commissioner Dwight should be the second choice for a visitation. 

Mr. Cass briefly reviewed current legislation and cir- 
culated a revised listing of bills which are before the Legislature 
and of special interest to the University. He noted the following 
dates of hearings which had not been available at the time of 
printing: 

H 648 - March 3 

H 1274 - March 4 

H 4691, - March 16 

Mr. Cass also noted that several bills on student unrest 
have been referred to committees for study. 

Professor Howards, as Chairman, reported for the com- 
mittee formed at the last meeting of the Committee on Government anc 
University Relations on January 23 to investigate possible establish 
ment of a University program of public service to municipalities 
within the state. 

The committee members (Professor Howards, Professor Good- 
win, Dean Gugin, Vice-Chancellor Hamilton and Secretary McCartney) 
have looked into the several aspects of such a program, including 
l ts implications anc * possible financing and location. The committee 
expects to have a report ready by the next meeting of the Committee 
on Government and University Relations, which is tentatively 
scheduled for April. 

There was discussion of the proposal for university 
centers which has been made by the Chancellor of the BHE. The seg- 
ments of the state system of higher education have been requested 
to review this proposal and to comment by May 15. 

In other business, the recent incident at UM/Amherst in 
which an organized protest group disrupted a speech by former Vice- 
President Humphrey was discussed at length, with particular emphasis 
on the effect of this action on the University's image with its 
various publics and constituencies. 



The meeting was adjourned at 




tees 



1 



COMMITTEE 



I 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF COMMITTEE ON BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS 

March 6, 1970, 10:00 a.m., UMass/Boston Project Office, 711 Boylstoi. 
Street, Boston and Sheraton-Plaza Hotel 

PRESENT : Chairman Haigis, President Lederle; 

Trustees Crowley, Maginnis, Pumphret; 
Treasurer Johnson, Secretary McCartney. 



ALSO 
PRESENT: 



From UM/A : Mr. Littlefield, Professor 

John Eldridge, Mrs . Hull. 

From UM/B : Chancellor Broderick, Vice- 

Chancellor Hamilton, Mr. O'Brien, Mr. 

Prince, Mr. Meehan. 

From UM/W : Dean Soutter. 

From Bureau of Building Construction : Mr. 

Edmund McAdam, Jr., Project Director. 

From the consulting firm of McKee, Berger & 

Mansueto : Mr. Ronald Rabin. 

Representatives of the following Architectural 

Firms : 

Anderson Beckwith and Haible 

Cambridge Seven Associates, Inc. 

Campbell, Aldrich & Nulty, Inc. 

Drummey, Rosane, Anderson 

Haldeman & Goransson, Associates, Inc. 

Harry Weese & Associates 

Geometries, Inc. 

Marvin E. Goody, John M. Clancy & Associates, 
Inc. 



Chairman Haigis convened the meeting at 10:15 a.m. and 
requested Mr. Littlefield to review the first agenda item: Engineer - 
ing Laboratory Feasibility Study - UM/ Amherst . 

Mr. Littlefield stated that design funds for this project 
were eighth on the University capital outlay priorities list for 
Fiscal 1971. The project will provide 225,000 G.S.F. of additional 
space for increased student enrollment in the School of Engineering 
Project cost, based on December, 1969 figures, is $12,600,000 for 
construction plus provision for fees and contingencies, and 
$4,500,000 for equipment, making a total of $18,990,000. 

Mr. Richard Rosane, of Drummey, Rosane, Anderson, pre- 
sented the overall conceptual design for the Engineering Laboratory 
Building, noting that the firm had worked with the School of Engi- 
neering Building Program Committee, and that several conceptual 
studies had been made. Meetings have also been held with repre- 
sentatives of the campus Master Planning Committee. The resulting 
design, Mr. Rosane said, will incorporate the "feeling of an Engi- 
neering Quadrangle: with the campus and present an entrance to the 
Engineering Complex, as well as providing access for service 
vehicles and anticipating major pedestrian traffic patterns in the 
area. 



347? 



Engineering 
Laboratory 
Feasibility 
Study - UM/Amheist 



3478 



COMMITTEE 



Approval - 
Schematics 
Columbia 
Point 



Library 

Building 

090 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

In response to a question from Chairman Haigis in regard 
to parking, Mr. Littlefield said that an increased demand on the 
facilities of the parking garage and other surface parking areas 
will be anticipated due to loss of existing parking space at the 
project site. 

The cost per G.S.F. is estimated at $50-$55. After appro- 
priation of design funds, the preliminary plans will be prepared 
and submitted to the Engineering faculty, University administration 
and consultants, and Trustees. Mr. Littlefield noted that the site 
and general concept had been recommended by the Master Planning 
Committee. 

Professor Eldridge, speaking for the Engineering Building 
Program Committee expressed great enthusiasm for the Laboratory 
design and noted that there had been "an extensive process of 
evolution" in the planning of the facility. 

After further brief discussion and on motion made, and 
seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
the Feasibility Study for the Engineering 
Laboratory Building, UM/A, as submitted by 
the architectural firm of Drummey, Rosane, 
Anderson and as detailed in Document T70- 
080 be approved at a total project cost of 
$18,990,000 based on 1969 construction costs 
and subject to availability of BBC in- 
flationary contingency funds. 

Chairman Haigis requested Vice-Chancellor Hamilton to 
present the second agenda item: Approval of Schematics - UM/Boston 
Campus at Columbia Point . Vice-Chancellor Hamilton introduced Mr. 
Edmund McAdam, Jr., the Project Director for the BBC for Columbia 
Point, who is working closely with the architectural firms design- 
ing the first six buildings for the Columbia Point (Phase I) . The 
schematics for each building were presented as, follows: 

LIBRARY - Building 090 

Architects: Harry Weese & Assdciates 



Presentation: 



Michael Lysec 
Harold Peddersen 



Mr. Lysec pointed out the importance of the Library 
structure to the total plan for the campus, commanding as it does a 
key position in the master plan configuration and relating strongly 
to the community via the Loop Road and the campus expressway en- 
trance, as well as to the inner campus areas. Pedestrian access 
ramps afford a visual link to the waterfront, and reading areas 
within the building are given priority orientation with views to 
the plaza and to Savin Cove. 



1 



COMMITTEE 



I 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Interim use of the library has been considered with 
temporary reading areas planned for some areas. Utilization of 
space for temporary classrooms is also possible. The library will 
house 480,000 volumes in Phase I, with an ultimate goal of 750,000 
volumes. Future expansion, if necessary, is possible "up," or 
through adaptation of parking space existing within the building. 
The estimated cost per G.S.F. is $50-$55. The projected cost is 
within the budget. 

Following the presentation of the complete schematic 
design for the library building, and after general discussion, it 
was moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
the Schematic Design for the Library - 
Columbia Point as presented by the archi- 
tectural firm of Harry Weese and Associates 
of 10 West Hubbard Street, Chicago and as 
detailed in Document T70-086 be approved. 

SCIENCE CENTER - Building 080 
Architects: Anderson Beckwith and Haible 
Presentation: William Haible 

All science facilities, with the exception of the Earth 
Sciences, which will be housed in the Colleges, are contained in 
this building. Mr. Haible presented an extensive review of details 
of classroom and laboratory arrangements and location of the com- 
puter, faculty offices, student and faculty reading rooms and 
lounges, and the rooftop greenhouse and animal quarters. 

Chairman Haigis raised the question of damage of glass 
from possible sonic booms, particularly to the greenhouse. Mr. 
Haible noted that sonic booms, if a problem, would be more of a 
threat to glass areas within the building, but that it would be 
possible to use heavier or wired glass if necessary. 

Vice-Chancellor Hamilton noted a budget problem in that 
estimates for the Science Center had come in at $28,000,000, which 
is some six million over the budget allocation. Work is being 
done, however, to bring the cost in line with the budget. The 
gross square footage, for instance, is being reduced in non-usable 
areas such as corridors. The cost per gross square foot is esti- 
mated at $58, with escalation to September 1970. 

Mr. McAdam noted that one problem with the estimates may 
have been due to shortage of time allowed for the estimator to 
work on the six buildings involved in the project. 

After further discussion, it was moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 

the Schematic Design for the Science Center - 
Columbia Point as presented by the architectural 
firm of Anderson Beckweith and Haible, 11 Beacon 
Street, Boston and as detailed in Document T70-082 
be aDDroved with the Drovlsn that the cost estimates 



3479 



Science 
Center - 
Columbia 
Point 
080 



3480 



COMMITTEE 



College 
020 



Proposal of 

Lowell 

Institute 

Cooperative 

Broadcasting 

Council 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



COLLEGE 020 

Architects: Cambridge Seven Associates, Inc . 



Presentation: 



Paul Dietrich 
William Goodwin 



College 020 is organized into six main functional areas - 
classrooms, science labs, laboratory, cafeteria, gymnasium and 
faculty offices. The se spaces and activities focus upon and inter- 
act with a central space or "street." The "street" acts as the 
main entry to the college, handles all circulation, encourages 
communication and aids orientation. Also, student activity areas 
and lounges are integrated to achieve efficient use of space and 
encourage maximum interchange. Library, cafeteria and lounge areas 
connect the "street" to the exterior providing views to the outside 
and the penetration of light into the interior circulation space. 

Following presentation and review of the complete design, 
it was moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
the Schematic Design for College 020 - 
Columbia Point as presented by the archi- 
tectural firm of Cambridge Seven Associates, 
Inc., 100 Massachusetts Avenue, Boston and 
as detailed in Document T70-084 be approved 
with the proviso that the cost estimates as 
of March 13, 1970 not exceed $20,000,000. 

As it was necessary to continue the presentation for 
Columbia Point following lunch, Secretary McCartney introduced, as 
other business, the status of the University's application for ETV 
Channel 57. 

A proposal has been made by the Lowell Institute Coopera- 
tive Broadcasting Council, dated December 1969, which, in effect, 
invites the University to join with other institutions such as 
Harvard, MIT, Boston University, Northeastern and Yale, as the 
seventeenth member of the Council. 

In addition, the WGBH Foundation proposes to construct a 
two-way microwave relay transmitter system between Amherst and 
Boston; activate a transmitter on Mt. Tom to carry Channel 57 and 
to provide other benefits, including the loan of equipment to the 
University for studio purposes. 

The University Broadcasting Council has reviewed this 
matter and recommends that the proposal by the WGBH Foundation be 
accepted subject to further negotiations on the details. 

After discussion, and on motion made and seconded, it was 



1 



COMMITTEE 



I 



3481 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 

the proposal of the Lowell Institute Coopera- 
tive Broadcasting Council to the University 
of Massachusetts dated December 24, 1969 to 
join said Council as its seventeenth member, 
as detailed in Document T70-049A, be accepted 
with the understanding that such acceptance 
commits the University to move forward in the 
field of educational television and commits 
the Lowell Institute Cooperative Broadcasting 
Council (WGBH- Educational Foundation) to im- 
plement the details of its proposal within 
the framework of a reasonable timetable and 
deadlines mutually agreed upon by representa- 
tives of WGBH for the University Broadcasting 
Council. 

It was also 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
the University relinquish its application 
to the Federal Communications Commission for 
a construction permit to activate Educational 
Television Channel 57 an d to withdraw its 
application to the Department of HEW for 
Federal matching funds to implement said 
channel; and that the University Broadcast- 
ing Council represented by its chairman, 
Robert J. McCartney, and other members of 
said Council as designated, be and they 
hereby are authorized to work cooperatively 
through joint counsel with representatives 
of the Lowell Institute Cooperative Broad- 
casting Council (WGBH Educational Foundation) 
to assist in activation of Channel 57 ^y t ^e 
WGBH Educational Foundation in consonance 
with the schedule of activities set forth 
in its proposal dated December 24, 1969 
(Document T70-049A) . 

Treasurer Johnson noted a serious security problem in the 
residence halls on the Amherst campus. There are increasing num- 
bers of incidents involving theft of University and student property 
and molesting of residents. Outsiders are suspected in many in- 
stances. Under existing regulations an offender may not be 
arrested. Treasurer Johnson proposes posting of notices inside 
residence halls which would read "This Building for Use of Residents 
and Their Guests Only." Such signs would be, in effect, "No Tres- 
passing" notices and would allow campus security officers to make 
immediate arrests when necessary. 



and 



After further general discussion, it was moved, seconded 



Security 



3482 



COMMITTEE 



College 
010 



Conceptual 
Design - 
Medical 
School 
Complex 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
they approve the signing of University 
residence halls in the following manner: 
"This Building for Use of Residents and 
Their Guests Only." 

COLLEGE 010 

Architects: Haldeman & Goransson Associates, Inc. 



Presentation: 



George Jacobovitz 

Ake Goransson 

S. Tyson Haldeman 



A strong architectural identity for this college has been 
provided by the architects while functionally elements have been 
zoned for the most efficient circulation within the college. The 
arrangement of activities has been planned to relate to site 
orientation and acoustics. Classroom and faculty areas are located 
inboard, while student activities are located outboard to be more 
directly receptive to the adjacent greenbelt and significant water- 
front views. Outdoor terrace areas and an arrangement of courts 
and open wells in the college relate activities and humanize the 
scale of the building. In coordination with other buildings, dark 
red-brown brick is the predominant exterior facing, with minor 
emphasis on structural concrete. 

It was moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
the Schematic Design for College 010 - 
Columbia Point as presented by the archi- 
tectural firm of Haldeman & Goransson 
Associates, Inc., 100 Cambridge Street, 
Boston and as detailed in Document T70-083 
be approved with the proviso that the cost 
estimates as of March 13, 1970 not exceed 
$20,000,000. 

The meeting was recessed at 12:00 noon for lunch at the 
Sheraton-Plaza Hotel. 

Following lunch, a presentation was made by the archi- 
tectural firm of Campbell, Aldrich and Nulty of the conceptual de- 
sign for the Medical School site (Document T70-081) . Loop and 
access roads were shown and, particularly, the relationship of the 
buildings within the total site concept. Mr. Lawrence Nulty and 
Mr. Mark Mendell pointed out details of the visually attractive de- 
sign which has been created by transformation of spaces over under- 
ground basement areas into courtyards. The spaces required water- 
proofing and would otherwise have been merely paved with asphalt. 
The architects plan shown provides secluded areas defined by low 
granite walls, with granite paving and seats. There will be areas 
of specimen plantings. One court, to heighten the visual impact, 
will include a fountain. Mr. Mendell asserted that the fountain 
will not add greatly to the expanse, however; only a single jet will 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

be used. The general effect will be to provide areas of tranquility 
and beauty which will greatly enhance the architecture of the com- 
plex and which should be of great therapeutic value to patients. 
The projected cost of adding these courts to the original design is 
estimated at $100,000, or 1/10 of 1% of the total cost of the pro- 
ject. Necessary funds are included in the budget. 

Treasurer Johnson expressed reservations regarding the 
possibility of executing this design at the projected cost. Messrs 
Nulty and Mendell, however, pointed out that the only extra expense 
incurred would be for the fountain and for additional granite. 

Dean Soutter stated that he had been impressed with the 
architects "skillful design," but that he had felt the matter 
should be submitted to the Trustees for approval. 

Trustee Pumphret stated that formal approval by the full 
Board of Trustees should not be necessary as the Board had pre- 
viously approved the plans for the Medical School as a whole, and 
no budget increase is involved. He felt that presenting the plan 
for courtyards to the Board for information purposes only would 
suffice. General agreement was expressed with this position. An 
informal presentation will, therefore, be made by the architects at 
the next meeting of the Board of Trustees. 

The meeting at the UMass/Boston Project Office was re- 
sumed at 2:00 p.m. with the presentation of the schematic designs fcjr 
the Administration Building and the Services and Supply Building. 



ADMINISTRATION BUILDING 



110 



Architects: Marvin E. Goody, John M. Clancy & Associates, Inc. 
Presentation: John Clancy 

The administration building will provide a "gateway" en- 
trance to the central plaza and campus for arrivals by transit and 
will be a "drop-off" point for automobile arrival; it will also 
house the University-wide enclosed pedestrian circulation network 
connecting all buildings. 

Three zones of activity divide the building: student and 
public oriented functions, non-student oriented administrative 
functions somewhat removed from pedestrian circulation networks, 
and parking and service facilities. 

It was then moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
the Schematic Design for the Administration 
Building - Columbia Point as presented by 
the architectural firm of Marvin E. Goody, 
John M. Clancy & Associates, Inc., 136 
Boylston Street, Boston and as detailed in 
Document T70-085 be approved with the proviso 
that the cost estimates as of March 13, 1970 
not exceed $5,560,000. 



3483 



Administration 

Building 

110 



3484 



COMMITTEE 

Central 

Supply and 

Service 

Building 

150 - 

Columbia 

Point 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



CENTRAL SUPPLY AND SERVICE BUILDING - 150 
Architects: Geometries, Inc . 

Presentation: David Wallace 

The overall goal for this building was creation of a 
flexible design. Consideration of a number of variables was neces- 
sary in planning: the eventual location of the Fine Arts Building, 
possible mass transit location, and the location of the Physical 
Education facilities. Also, the Administration Building looks down 
upon Central Supply and Services, necessitating landscaping of at 
least half of the roof. Future expansion of the Supply Building 
has been taken into consideration. and is possible to the north. 

Treasurer Johnson noted the special requirements necessary 
for handling mail, and the necessity for planning adequate facili- 
ties for this purpose, citing the experience at Amherst where 
central mail handling facilities are already "tight." 

Possible problems with abnormal foundations were noted: 
cost hinges on this factor. It is a "bare bones" building other- 
wise. 

It was moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
,, the Schematic Design for the Central Supply 
and Service Building - Columbia Point as 
presented by the architectural firm of 
Geometries, Inc., 23 Arrow Street, Cambridge 
and as detailed in Document T70-087 be 
approved with the proviso that the cost 
estimates as of March 13, 1970 no* exceed 
$3,400,000. 

The meeting was adjourned at 2:45 p.m. 





McCartney, 
Board of Trustees 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON FINANCE 
March 13, 1970, Room 419, Statler-Hilton Hotel, Boston 



PRESENT: 



ALSO 
PRESENT: 



Chairman Pumphret, President Lederle; 
Trustees Knowles, Rowland, Sweig, 
Weldon; Treasurer Johnson, Secretary 
McCartney. 



From UMA : Mrs. Hull. 

From UM/B: Vice-Chancellor Hamilton. 



This brief meeting of the Finance Committee was convened 
by Chairman Pumphret at 1:45 p.m. for the purpose of discussion of 
Transfer of Funds: UM/Boston, UM/Worcester and UM/ Amherst . 

The Chairman called upon Vice-Chancellor Hamilton to ex- 
plain the request for internal budget transfers for UM/Boston. The 
Vice-Chancellor stated that the sum of $125,000.00 was needed in 
the 03 Account due to the requirements of Summer School, a require- 
ment made necessary by the absence of permanent positions requested 
of the Legislature. 

There was general discussion of the background situation 
which necessitates periodic transfers of funds between accounts to 
meet contingencies, expected or otherwise. It was pointed out that 
one recurring problem is that many necessary positions are not 
created by the state within the 01 and 02 accounts. This necessi- 
tates transferring of funds into the 03 account to pay salaries for 
necessary personnel. 

In response to Trustee Knowles question as to the neces- 
sity of regularly recurring deficits in specific accounts, Chairman 
Pumphret stated that some transferring of funds from one account to 
another within the general budget allocation for each campus is 
anticipated during each fiscal year. 

In regard to the situation at UM/Boston, Vice-Chancellor 
Hamilton stated that it has been necessary to pay needed secre- 
taries for instance, on the Boston campus, out of 03 funds for 
periods of up to two or three years. 

The present deficits in the Boston budget had been fore- 
case, the Vice-Chancellor said, and have been discussed with Com- 
missioner Dwight. 

After general discussion, it was moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To authorize the Treasurer to make the follow- 
ing transfers between subsidiary accounts at 
UM/Boston: 

From Account 08 to Account 03 the sum of $50,000.00 

From Account 13 to Account 03 the sum of $75,000.00 



3485 



Subsidiary 

Accounts 

UM/Boston 

Transfers 



3486 



COMMITTEE 



Subsidiary 
Accounts 

UM/Worcester 

Transfers 



Subsidiary 
Accounts 
UM/ Amherst 

Transfers 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

A request in memorandum form from Associate Dean for Ad- 
ministrative Affairs John Stockwell for UM/Worcester was next con- 
sidered. Dean Stockwell noted an outstanding invoice from Ellerbe 
Associates for consulting services. He requested transfer of the 
sum of $60,000.00 from the 02 account to the 03 account to carry the 
active planning account through for the remainder of the fiscal 
year. 

On motion made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To authorize the Treasurer to make the followiLpg 
transfers between subsidiary accounts at UM/ 
Worcester : 

From Account 1350-38-02 to Account 1350-38-03 
the sum of $60,000.00. 

Treasurer Johnson noted transfers to be made at UM/ Amherst 
which had been outlined in his Quarterly Report for the period 
July 1, 1969 to December 31, 1969. He requested approval of the 
transfers at this time. 

The transfers, the Treasurer said, are made necessary for 
the following reasons: 

1. Additional cost of holiday and overtime pay in 
areas with a critical shortage of licensed 
personnel (power plant engineers, plumbers, 
electricians) . 

2. Additional cost of holiday and overtime pay 
in the security department caused by in- 
adequate staffing and student unrest. 

3. Replacement of certain key employees on 
extended sick leave. 

After brief discussion, it was moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To effect from the 01 to the 02 account, and 

from the 08 to the 14 account at UM/ Amherst as 
set forth below: 

From Account 1350-01-01 to Account 1350-01-02 
the sum of $90,000.00. 

Funds needed in 02 to cover overtime and holiday 
pay. Added overtime was needed due to student unrest. 

From Account 08 to Account 14 the sum of $60,000.00. 
To provide funds for postage and telephone. 

The meeting was adjourned art 2-)00 p.m. 




'Robert J. McCa? 
Secre-tary, Board oi 




ney 
rustees 



I 



COMMITTEE 



I 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF COMMITTEE ON FACULTY AND EDUCATIONAL POLICY 
March 19, 1970, 10:30 a.m., Room 406, Statler Hilton Hotel, Boston 

PRESENT : Chairman Troy, President Lederle; Trustees 

Lyons, Maginnis, Olken; Secretary McCartney. 



ALSO 
PRESENT: 



From UM/A : Chancellor Tippo, Acting Provost 
Gluckstern, Associate Provost Allen, Graduate 
Dean Appley, Dean of Arts and Sciences Shapiro, 
Assistant Dean of Administration Gugin; Pro- 
fessors Freeman, Thelwell, Ulin; Mrs. Hull. 
From UM/B : Chancellor Broderick, Mr. Cass. 
From MIT : Dr. Noam Chomsky 



Chairman Troy convened the meeting at 10:45 a.m. and 
noted that the first item - Petition of Mrs. Jarvesoo - had been 
struck from the agenda due to a conflict in Counsellor Broadhurst's 
schedule. Another date will be arranged for the hearing. 

The Chairman requested presentation of the second agenda 
item - Proposal to Establish a Program in Linguistics and to Offer 
the M.A. and Ph.D. Degrees . Graduate Dean Appley stated that the 
proposed program was an excellent one and had his strong support; he 
recommended its approval. Dean Appley introduced Professor Donald 
Freeman, Acting Chairman of the Committee on Program in Linguistics, 
who presented a summary of the proposed program. Copies of the 
proposal had been circulated previously. 

Professor Freeman noted that the basic field in linguis- 
tics has been fundamentally redefined since 1957, with much of the 
pioneering work in the field having been done by Professor Noam 
Chomsky of MIT and his colleagues. As a consequence of this work, 
transformational-generative linguistics now focuses upon the mental 
processes by which ideas and logical relationships generated in the 
mind are transformed into natural language, and how these processes 
relate to language comprehension and first-language learning. Much 
research is now being done in the light of these new theoretical 
developments, Professor Freeman said, within related fields of in- 
quiry: on changes in literary style and language, figures of 
speech, rhetoric and metrics; on acoustics, speech perception and 
intonation; on concept formation and learning theory; on the 
philosophy of language; on grammar of individual languages and 
language families; on teaching of English in the public schools. 
Contributions are also being made to other disciplines - psychology, 
philosophy, anthropology, biology, literary criticism and mathe- 
matics, among others. As a consequence of the changes in approach 
in the field of linguistics, most potentital faculty members have 
received their doctorates since 1965 - a fact which would create, 
Professor Freeman pointed out, a "young faculty" for the program. 

Professor Freeman reviewed the courses and requirements 
as outlined in the proposal (Document T70-089) . The program as 



348? 



Proposal for 
Linguistics 
Program - 
M.A. &. Ph.D. 
Degrees 



3488 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

proposed will be primarily a graduate discipline, in the belief 
that the best graduate work in linguistics is done by students who 
have done their undergraduate work in the more traditional disci- 
plines. However, courses will be open to most of the student body, 
both graduate and undergraduate. 

Trustee Lyons inquired as to the extent of cooperative effort 
existing with other area colleges, particularly Hampshire College. 
Professor Freeman said that very good relationships existed, 
especially with Hampshire, and that many advantageous arrangements 
could be made in recruiting and faculty exchange within the Five- 
College framework. Chairman Troy noted that, at a recent Five- 
College Presidents' meeting, scheduling of classes at the various 
institutions had been mentioned as a problem area - "a major 
stumbling block." 

Trustee Lyons inquired as to linguistics requirements in 
the School of Education. Professor Ulin replied that, while there 
are many Educational-majors taking linguistics courses, there are 
no state certification requirements (as in California, for instance) 
for these courses, although there is evidence of pressure in this 
direction. 

Dr. Noam Chomsky of MIT was introduced to the meeting. 
Commenting, at Chancellor Tippo's request, on the Linguistics Pro- 
gram, Dr. Chomsky stated that the program as outlined should be 
"one of the strongest in the country." He also commented that the 
proposed recruitment of young Ph.D.'s for the faculty was "just 
right," as very high caliber people had been attracted to the field 
in recent years . 

Dr. Chomsky reviewed the many changes in the study of 
linguistics, noting that there had been a renewal of interest in 
some of the oldest forms of study and that there had now been an 
incorporation of psychology with these older traditions. 

Trustee Lyons asked if research in linguistics could con- 
ceivably lead to greater effectiveness in language- learning pro- 
cesses. Dr. Chomsky replied that it was hoped that these teaching 
processes could- be improved; that they were now catastrophic, 
especially in the elementary schools. Replying to Trustee 
Maginnis ' question as to how many departments of linguistics were 
now in existence, Dr. Chomsky replied that there were perhaps only 
a half-dozen first-class departments, but many others of lesser 
distinction. 

Professor Ulin noted that there was evidently no question 
as to the fact that this program is being established at the gradu- 
ate rather than at the undergraduate level. In this connection, 
Professor Freeman noted the unexpectedly large demand for under- 
graduate courses that has developed at UMass/Amherst . 

President Lederle commended Professor Freeman for his en- 
thusiasm and the excellence of his report. Particular appreciation 
was also expressed to Dr. Chomsky for his enlightening participation 
in the discussion. 



3489 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

After further consideration by the committee, it was 
moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that a 

graduate program leading to the M.A. and Ph.D. 
Degrees in Linguistics (Document T70-089) be 
approved. 

Chairman Troy next invited presentation of the third 
agenda item - Proposal for the Formation of the W.E.B. DuBois De - 
partment of Afro-American Studies . Chancellor Tippo requested Pro- 
fessor Thelwell, Chairman of the University Committee on Afro- 
American Studies, to make the report. 

Professor Thelwell emphasized the unique qualities of the 
proposed department, and the importance of the Five-College coopera 
tive effort to the program. He stated that two basic aspects of 
the program are of equal importance: the traditional academic 
offerings, and the relationship of the department to the black com- 
munity. Academic work offered is to run across the boundaries of 
various disciplines such as History, Social Sciences, literature, 
the Arts, languages and other areas relevant to the black experi- 
ence. Involvement with the black community, Professor Thelwell said 
would include exchanges of resources and of faculty members and 
students, not only in the United States, but on an international 
scale, extending to Africa and other parts of the world. The In- 
tention would be to create, in effect, "an international program 
concerning itself with activist and community matters for people of 
African descent throughout the world, in the hope of reducing the 
sense of cultural isolation now felt by black peoples." 

In regard to the academic courses to be offered, Pro- 
fessor Thelwell stated that it would be necessary to bear in mind 
that these would be "revisionist rather than traditionalist scholar- 
ship." Black scholars, he said, cannot accept a great many tradi- 
tional assumptions of sociology and history, which have become domi- 
nant. Professor Thelwell said that he was "appalled at the limits 
of structure and orientation which have been put into the systems 
of education." The hope is to experiment, in a sense, with scholar- 
ship that is meaningful to the realities of the black experience. 

Chancellor Tippo stated that the proposal to establish the 
department had gone through all the proper channels, and that it had 
been approved by the Academic Matters Committee of the Faculty 
Senate and by the Senate without dissenting vote. 

There is now a small but dedicated faculty in the area of 
Black Studies, Professor Thelwell said, which it is hoped will be 
increased by ten new first-rate faculty members by September, 1970. 
With this increase, it would be expected that the department would b£ 
fully operational by the next academic year. Professor Thelwell 
described the program as being coherent; he said it is moving, in 
cooperation with Five-College effort, rapidly toward implementation. 



Proposal - 
W.E.B. DuBois 
Department of 
Afro-American 
Studies 



3490 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Trustee Lyons raised the possibility that use of the term 
"revisionist" might imply sheer propaganda value: "Revision," Dr. 
Lyons said, "exists in every field retaining vitality." Professor 
Thelwell replied that he was not as concerned with the point regard- 
ing possible propaganda purposes as with the structuring of reali- 
ties. He noted the extraordinary caliber of the people in the de- 
partment, and the fact that they were not orthodox. "Because of 
their radical posture they have an almost fanatical regard for 
scholarship," he said. 

Chairman Troy raised questions concerning the degree of 
emergence of black scholars in general, also, the fact that the 
proposed program for the department was entirely within the Social 
Sciences. Professor Thelwell replied that there were already con- 
siderable numbers of black scholars and that this was not obvious 
perhaps because they had taken positions somewhat at odds with the 
positions of the traditionalists. Regarding the study of subjects 
other than the Social Sciences, Professor Thelwell stated that these 
students would be enrolled in regular courses. He indicated that he 
did not support the extremist position of teaching"black biology," 
for instance. 

Replying to a question, Dean Shapiro stated that an in- 
crease in the number of black faculty members was also projected 
outside of the Department of Afro-American Studies. 

In Connection with the proposed name of the department, 
Trustee Maginnis stated that Dr. BuBois ' very great contributions 
to black history and his leadership in such areas as the founding 
of the NAACP as well as his record of scholastic achievement were 
generally recognized, and that it was fitting to pay homage to such 
a distinguished son of Massachusetts. General Maginnis felt, howeve 
that some question might arise as to the precedent of naming of the 
department for an individual when no other University department is 
so named. 

"No other department resembles this one," Professor 
Thelwell replied. 

Chancellor Tippo commented that naming the department for 
Dr. DuBois would serve to dramatize an unusual department, and that 
there was limited precedent existing in the naming of Stockbridge 
School. President Lederle added that it was important to give the 
department a distinctive name at this stage of its development. 

Considerable discussion ensued on the point raised by 
Chairman Troy as to the use of Dr. DuBois name by Marxist groups. 
Professor Thelwell said that large numbers of blacks were increas- 
ingly resentful of this interpretation. He stated that "the 
Marxist interpretation of his later work does not do justice to his 
life and work." 

Trustee Maginnis requested more information as to the scope 
of activity of the Five-College Coordinating Committee on Black 
Studies, stating that he hoped it was not a "super-structure" with 
power to bypass normal chann e ls.. It was emphasized in reply that 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

the Five-College Committee serves in an advisory capacity only; 
that its function is a coordinating one, serving as an aid in such 
areas as recruiting and in the problem area of transportation 
mentioned earlier. 

Noting that "more Five-College students come to us than 
we send away," President Lederle suggested that Chancellor Tippo 
report at the next meeting on the extent of participation in the 
Five-College Program. Associate Provost Allen noted that he had 
done a study two years ago, establishing the ratio of exchange at 
that time as 3.7 to 1. Professor Thelwell commented that this 
ratio would be even higher in the area of Black Studies. 

Chairman Troy expressed concern over the use of the word 
"mandatory" in the description of introductory courses for non- 
majors (p. 19). Professor Thelwell stated that this problem had 
been resolved by striking this word out. 

Chairman Troy also stated that the word "autonomy" needs 
definition. (As used on p. 13 of the report) the Chairman felt that 
the powers implied seemed to be "rather sweeping." President 
Lederle noted that there would be a clear preservation of regular 
channels as with any other department within the College of Arts 
and Sciences. Professor Thelwell indicated that it would not be 
necessary to insist on use of the word "autonomy": that the in- 
tention was to indicate that arrangements could be made within the 
"conceptual design of the Department." 

Professor Thelwell then left the meeting. 

Following general consideration and discussion, it was 
moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
the formation of the W.E.B. DuBois Depart- 
ment of Afro-American Studies in the College 
of Arts and Sciences (Document T70-088) be 
approved. 

President Lederle presented a proposal to renew an agree- 
ment with the other New England Universities which allows students 
who are children of faculty members of other participating institu- 
tions (Vermont is the only non-participant) to be accepted at in- 
state tuition rates. 

The President noted that this had proved to be a very 
useful arrangement and that it had worked very well. He recommended 
renewal . 

After discussion, it was moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that for 
a period of three years, beginning with the 
academic year 1970-71, the University of Massa- 
chusetts will treat as in-state students the 
children of faculty members of those New England 
Universities that afford reciprocal arrangements. 



3491 



Reciprocal 
Tuition 

Agreement - 
New England 
Universities 



3492 



Amendments - 
Faculty 
Senate 
Constitution 

COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Chancellor Tippo presented for approval two amendments to 
the Faculty Senate Constitution (s.6.c. and s.8.j.). President 
Lederle noted that the wording should be changed from "President" 
to "Chancellor" and suggested that it might be desirable to make 
a systematic review of this document as a whole and others if nec- 
cessary, to assure wording consistent with our new organization of 
the Amherst campus under a Chancellor, with the President now assum- 
ing a system role. Chancellor Tippo felt, however, that the changes 
in s.6.c. and s.8.j. should be voted upon at the present time, giv- 
ing evidence of Trustee response to the Senate request while en- 
visioning more complete language change subsequently. 

After further discussion, it was moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that the 
Faculty Senate Constitution be amended to read: 
(s . 6.c. ) 

The Chancellor of the University shall be the 
President of the Senate. At the last meeting 
of the Senate in the spring semester, the 
Senate shall elect a Chairman pro tempore who 
will preside at Senate meetings in the absence 
of the Chancellor or when the Chancellor does 
not desire to preside. In the absence of this 
Chairman pro tempore or when both the Chancellor 
and the Chairman pro tempore so desire, the 
Secretary of the Senate shall preside. 

It was also 

TS recommend to the Board of Trustees 
VOTED : that s.8.j. of the Constitution (Health 

Council) be amended by deleting the phrase 
in the last sentence "and five students... 
Married Students" and replacing it with the 
phrase, "five undergraduate students se- 
lected by the Undergraduate Student Senate, 
and two graduate students selected by the 
Graduate Student Senate. 



The meeting was adjourned at 12:35 p.m. 




Rob6 
Secretar 





t"J. McCartney 
Board of Trusnees 



! 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF COMMITTEE ON BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS 

March 31, 1970, 12 Noon, Dining Commons #7, U of M 

Amherst 

PRESENT : Chairman Haigis, Trustee Lambson; 
Secretary McCartney. 
From UM/A : Chancellor Tippo, 
Treasurer Johnson, Associate Provost 
Gluckstern, Associate Treasurer Brand, 
Messrs. Lambert, Littlef ield, Madsen, 
Norton; Mrs. Dec, Mrs. Hull. From the 
President's Rent Committee : Mr. Albert, 
Chairman; Miss Dudash, Professors Howards 
and Ludtke; Miss Olken, Mr. Teixeira, Mr. 
Williams, Mr. Elters. Representing the 
Central Residence Area : Messrs. Cochrane, 
Benjamin, Gibson, Woods. 
From UM/W : Dean Soutter 

Chairman Haigis convened the meeting at 1:20 p.m. and ex- 
pressed appreciation for the effective work done by the President's 
Committee on Room Rents and Fees over the past few weeks. He noted 
that, without a quorum, no official action could be taken by the 
committee, but that the issues would be thoroughly discussed and 
recommendations made to the Board for action in April. 

Chairman Haigis invited Mr. James Albert, Chairman of the 
President's Rent Committee to make that committee's report. Mr. 
Albert thanked Treasurer Johnson for his cooperation. He also 
particularly noted the very valuable contributions made to the work 
of the committee by members of the Faculty Senate, and especially 
by Professor James Ludtke, Chairman of the Faculty Senate Budget 
Committee. He noted also that there had been further consultation 
and meetings since the mailing of the report. 

Treasurer Johnson reviewed the meeting of the Student 
Senate of the evening before (March 30) at which he and Associate 
Treasurer Brand had answered questions concerning the Treasurer's 
Report. Mr. Johnson spoke of the cooperative attitude of the Stu- 
dent Senate at this meeting and the general cooperation evident 
overall in what had been a "joint effort on the rent situation." 
Revised copies of the Treasurer's Memorandum on Student Room Rents 
(March 26, 1970) were distributed. This revision contained written- 
in changes, as agreed upon at the March 30 meeting. Mr. Johnson 
noted that these recommendations were a "package"; that is, the 
policies and fees were interdependent and that various parts of the 
proposal could not be rejected without affecting the proposed rates. 

A copy of the Treasurer's memorandum (Document T70-090) is 
attached. This contains the votes suggested for Board of Trustee 
action on Room Rates and Policy - Amherst and Student Room Deposit 
System - Amherst . 



3493 



Room Rates 
UM/ Amherst 



3494 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Mr.Elters, Vice-President of the Student Senate, reviewed 
the motion passed by the Senate on March 30. (A copy of this motion 
was not then available but is now attached to these minutes) . In 
essence, the motion states that, although the Senate appreciates the 
work of the Rent Committee and the Treasurer's Office, it is not 
ready at this time to accept any reports; also, the Student Senate 
favors at this time seeking some form other than self-liquidation 
for dormitory support; also, the Senate feels this is the time to 
approach the state for financial assistance. 

Mr. Johnson commented that the rent increase was "high, 
and undesirable in many ways," and that the Student Senate had 
focused on the critical issue. "The public policies of the Common- 
wealth in this regard are based on the principle of self-liquidation 
and this is the only framework within which I can work at the pre- 
sent time," Mr. Johnson said. 

Chairman Haigis asked if there was precedent for other 
forms of residence hall support. Mr. Johnson replied that prior to 
the establishment of the Building Authority in 1959, all dormitory 
rents were turned into the state treasury. All expenses were then 
paid out of appropriated funds. Amounts turned over to the state in 
this manner, Mr. Johnson said, were larger than amounts spent on the 
dormitories. "Students were short-changed, dorm maintenance was ver) 
bad," Mr. Johnson said, adding that he did not rule out the possi- 
bility of some change of policy in the future. 

Trustee Lambson observed that the written- in changes in 
the Treasurer's memorandum were substantial. He particularly noted, 
on page 3, Item 4(a), that the line, "After all accounts due the 
University had been settled," had been struck. Miss Olken explained 
that this change was only to insure that money paid for room deposits 
would be used only for that purpose; the University has other means 
of collecting student accounts. Mr. Johnson said that he had no 
great concern over this change. 

Mr. William Gibson, representing the Central Residence 
Area, presented to the Secretary copies of a petition carrying 800 
signatures of residents of Gorman, Brooks, Hills North and South, 
Wheeler, Van Meter, Baker and Butterfield Residence Halls. (A copy 
of the petition is attached) In response to a statement made in the 
petition that a room rent increase would force hundreds of students 
to leave the University, Chairman Haigis stated that the Trustees 
"would take a dim view" of such a situation and that every effort 
would be made to provide financial assistance if it became necessary. 

Regarding the suggested second vote on page 2, the 
Treasurer emphasized that rates were based on occupancy of at least 
957o. The student handbook rule has been leniently enforced, he said, 
and there has not been full occupancy for the last few years. 

Also, in regard to this same suggested vote, Mr. Albert, 
said that it was his understanding that student room contracts were 
for one semester. Mr. Johnson replied that the contracts were, in- 
deed, for one semester, and that "this is taken care of later on" in 
the report. 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Professor Ludtke stated that he had recently met with the 
Chairman of the Building Authority and that it should be noted that 
the Authority uses a differing definition of "occupancy" based on 
twelve-month income, and including summer contributions. Thus, to 
insure 957o "total occupancy" would actually mean 96-91% occupancy 
for the academic year. 

Mr. Gibson, speaking for students in the Central Area, 
said that full occupancy "might hurt occupants, as some student 
rooms had been taken away and that the students had been attempting 
to get these back." The Treasurer replied that new inventories had 
been made which determine the use of all space. 

Referring to page 11 of the Treasurer's Report, Professor 
Ludtke noted that, using a 6% interest rate, and a cost figure no 
lower than those projected, higher occupancy - possibly up to 98% - 
would reduce student costs still further. It would be up to the 
students and the administration, Professor Ludtke, said, to determin 
vhat would be a feasible occupancy rate. The 957> rate used as a 
norm is optimum based on the experience of the last few years, Mr. 
Johnson explained. 

Regarding the Room Deposit System, page 3, Mr. Johnson 
described the problems arising under the present system, with many 
students who had reserved rooms in the spring not returning in the 
fall. This situation has created vacant beds and at the same time 
has denied space to other students. The proposed plan, Mr. Johnson 
said, is a positive system whereby a student who has reserved a 
room and does not notify the University of cancellation by a stated 
deadline forfeits the deposit. 

Mr. Albert noted in connection with the room deposit 
system that this should also avoid tripling, and that the July 1 
date set for payment of the $50 deposit was a change from June 1 
as originally set by the Treasurer. 

"Students would have a chance to earn the money at their 
summer jobs by July 1," Miss Olken said. 

Mr. Williams asked Mr. Johnson if a student paying the 
deposit "would be guaranteed the space allocated" and if this would 
also be a guarantee against tripling." Mr. Johnson replied that he 
did not anticipate any difficulties under the new system. 

Chairman Haigis, noting the undesirability of having a 
"built-in Gold Coast" of more expensive dormitories, inquired as to 
the feeling of students assigned to the traditional dormitories. 
Mr. Gibson replied that many students actually preferred the older 
dormitories; that they had "an entirely different atmosphere." The 
Chairman also emphasized the importance of renovation of the older 
dormitories and expressed the hope that the Treasurer's Office would 
be able to keep this work on schedule. Mr. Johnson agreed that some 
of the dormitories were "in poor condition." He noted that a major 
element affecting renovations was the fact that it had been necessar^ 
to reserve funds for the retroactive pay raise voted state employees 
last year. Mr. Littlefield also commented that "extensive renova- 
tion knocks Out a dorm fnr nrrnnanev " 



3495 



3496 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Chairman Haigis expressed hope that the students were 
satisfied with the efforts of the Trustees and the administration to 
solve the rent problems and also that they would feel reassured that 
reasonable efforts would be made to renovate and refurbish the 
dormitories . 

Regarding the suggested vote on page 2 (vote #3) of his 
report, Treasurer Johnson said that students had brought to his 
attention the fact that some dormitory space was not producing 
revenue. Various non-student uses of space were discussed: space 
used for academic purposes, counselors living in rooms designed for 
double occupancy, children of heads of residence occupying dormitory 
rooms, and other uses. "There will be no further use of student 
rooms without payment to dormitory accounts," Mr. Johnson stated. 

Mr. Albert noted in particular the non-residence use of 
space in Brooks, Arnold and Mills Houses where debt service has been 
paid. "If students were living there," Mr. Albert said, "this 
would be a source of surplus income." Chancellor Tippo said that 
he would look into this situation. 

Professor Ludtke stated that he wished to express his dis- 
pleasure, as a matter of record, with the financial summary of 
page 9 of the Treasurer's Report. "This does not show," he said, 
"the requested estimates of the net cash contributions from Mills 
and Arnold Houses, if fully used as residences. The decision to 
keep these debt-free buildings "off-line" for residential use could 
affect the total rent situation by perhaps as much as $50,000, or 
$5.00 per student," Professor Ludtke said. He added that it was 
the understanding of the rent committee at the March 30 meeting 
that these "guesstimates" would be provided in the Treasurer's 
revised memorandum to the Board. 

Mr. Johnson stated that he had agreed "guesstimates" 
could be made, but that he had no correct figures as yet. Mr. Brand 
had projected, however, the Treasurer said, that use of Arnold as a 
residence hall might yield a possible $40,000 in income annually. 

Mr. Elters said that off -campus housing offered advantage 
over dormitories -- better facilities at a lower cost per person 
when a group of students share an apartment. "For instance," he 
said, "six people can rent three bedrooms, two baths at around 
$35.84 per student off -campus. Typical dormitory accommodations 
for two - no private bath - $55.56." Mr. Elters noted a "great 
discrepancy" and added that "if there is to be a rent increase, it 
must be justified." Mr. Littlefield noted that the housing survey 
now under way should give an indication of the directions future 
housing should take - perhaps low-configuration Puffton-type dwell- 
ings. 

Professor Ludtke commented that "students were paying a 
good many of the bills" for all dormitory costs - that M&O accounts 
were charged to students, as were many other expenses. The Trustees 
have gone out of their way, Professor Ludtke said, to see the stu- 
dent point of view and to make desired changes. He felt that the 
policies governing student assessments should also be considered. 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

"Another point," Professor Ludtke said, "is that student funds are 
deposited in general accounts in various banks around the state. 
These accounts are large enough so that no service charges are paid 
Thus, student funds contribute to University administrative ex- 
penses in that the addition of these funds to University accounts 
helps to eliminate service charges. This provides the University 
more investment funds than it would otherwise have. The students, 
however, felt that they did not wish to pursue this point." Pro- 
fessor Ludtke added, "I just do not believe that students are ask- 
ing for very much." 

Chancellor Tippo noted that there was no proration of 
general administrative costs and that counselors and heads of 
residences were not paid out of dormitory funds. 

There was general discussion of student inflicted damage 
to buildings and furnishings, and the procedures involved in col- 
lections for such damage. Mr. Johnson said that collections did 
not seem to be running as high as they should be. There was no 
student objection to the votes suggested on this matter. 

Mr. Albert noted that interest income figures were 
omitted on page 9 of the Treasurer's Report, and that calculations 
based on 67o interest income and 957o occupancy would yield: On 
Projects 1-10: $25,147; Project 12: $4,813, and on the traditional 
dormitories: $11,536, totalling $41,496. 

Mr. Albert also requested Treasurer Johnson's figures for 
Mills House. Mr. Johnson said that with two floors used and with 
all debt service paid, and covering M&O expense, estimated income 
would be $1300 annually. He had not completed, he said, the esti- 
mates for full occupancy of Mills. 

Chancellor Tippo emphasized the fact that conference use 
of student rooms would be on a voluntary basis in the future. The 
Chancellor favored exploration of the possibility of increased in- 
come through higher rates for conferees, where students desired 
this increased revenue from dormitory rooms. 

Mr. Albert suggested that if the income from Mills and 
Arnold Houses, the interest on student deposits, and increased con- 
ference income were all figured into total revenue, a further re- 
duction in room rents - estimated as high as $10 per student - 
might be possible. 

Professor Ludtke commented that the Rent Committee had 
had no survey data on which to base projected differentials for the 
various types of dormitory accommodations. However, he said, the 
committee felt that Brett and Gorman Houses, although the first of 
the new dormitories, should more fairly be moved into the tradition- 
al sub-set in terms of the rental scale. 



349? 



3498 



COMMITTEE 



Easement for 
Road - 
Married 
Student 
Housing 
UM/ Amherst 

Cohn 
Property 



East Pleasant 
Street By- 
pass 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Mr. Benjamin, a student resident of Gorman, agreed 
emphatically. He described as "absurd," the differences between 
Gorman and the Southwest Area. "We have one lounge room which 
barely holds 20 people with no furniture," he said. The Treasurer 
agreed, at Chairman Haigis ' request, to look into the matter of 
Brett and Gorman Houses before the April meeting of the Board. 

This concluded discussion of the student room rent issue, 
and related matters. Chairman Haigis again expressed appreciation 
for the Rent Committee's work and asked that the committee not con- 
sider itself discharged. Mr. Albert concurred, stating that the 
Rent Committee felt that it had several charges remaining. 

The next matter discussed was Agenda Item 3: Easement 
for Road - Married Student Housing Project - UM/Amherst (Cohn 
Property ) . The Town of Amherst insists that an access road for this 
project be provided which does not exit onto already heavily con- 
gested North Pleasant Street. Mr. Cohn, owner of the adjoining 
Presidential Apartments, has offered to give the University an ease 
ment across his property west of the high-tension lines for purposes 
of a University road to exit back of the campus. There is one 
condition: that the University permit a tie-in for the Presidential 
Apartments onto the road. The options in this situation, Mr. 
Johnson said, are (1) accept this proposal (2) acquire property for 
this purpose through purchase or (3) no road. Mr. Johnson recom- 
mends acceptance of the Cohn proposal and construction of the road. 
It has been University policy in the past, the Treasurer said, not 
to permit private interests to tie into University roads, but he 
felt that a concession is indicated in this case. 

Director of Planning Littlefield recommended the easement 
as the simplest solution. He also pointed out that the road through 
the Married Student Housing Project would be "horse-shoe shaped" to 
prevent its use as a "back road." North Pleasant Street is now a 
hazard to the town and to the University, and this new road would 
help to improve circulation patterns. 

After further discussion, it was agreed to recommend that 
the Board vote: 

To accept the offer of an easement from Louis R. 
Cohn for the purpose of a road across the westerly 
portion of Parcel 1, page 8A as shown In the Town 
of Amherst Atlas - said easement to be a minimum 
of 100 feet in width and lying west and parallel 
to the Western Massachusetts Electric Company 
power line with the provision that said Louis R. 
Cohn may have access from the Presidential Apart- 
ments to said road when constructed. 

Mr. Lambert, Landscape Architect for the University, next 
presented the East Pleasant Street By-pass Road Location - Amherst . 
Mr. Lambert pointed out details of the State Department of Public 
Works plan for this road construction as presented at a recent meet- 
ing in Amherst. Essentially the plan will provide an alternate 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

route of two paved lanes and two paved shoulders to reroute traffic 
around the University campus. It will, at the same time, provide 
a route for Marks Meadow School students who now cut across Uni- 
versity property. Pedestrian bridges will be constructed where in- 
dicated. The University has suggested some changes in the DPW plan 
to lessen grade, provide safer interchanges, and improve aesthetics 
Plans are now in final stages of acceptance. Construction must be 
completed by January 1, 1973 - September 1, 1971 is a possibility. 

After discussion, it was agreed to recommend to the Board 
of Trustees that they vote: 

To approve the preliminary layout and plan for 
the East Pleasant Street by-pass road as pre- 
sented to the meeting. 

Dean Soutter gave a progress report on Medical School con- 
struction. He also informed the committee of problems which may be 
developing. Shaw Building renovations are proceeding on schedule. 
There are problems, however, with the site work as more ledge has 
been encountered than expected, increasing costs. The power plant 
is out to bid (since early March) and the Medical Science Building 
will go out in early April. Problems in approval by the State 
Bureau of Safety of some details of construction have been en- 
countered. For instance, Dean Soutter said, the sky- lights and 
shaft which light the interior and mezzanines of portions of the 
library (and which are similar to those at Harvard) are said to be 
illegal and must be redesigned. Dean Soutter hopes to find a 
solution to this problem. 

Mr. Johnson advised that the Belchertown Pomology Storage 
Building bids will open April 15. Mr. Johnson also reviewed the 
matter of the Murray D. Lincoln estate in Ohio, which has been held 
in trust with the University named as benefactor. Mr. Lincoln's 
bequest is "for the benefit of students." The Treasurer will in- 
spect the property some time in the near future and will then make 
further recommendations as to its disposition. 

Mr. Johnson noted that it was necessary to approve re- 
vised schedules for the firm of Gordon Ainsworth, Civil Engineers, 
retained by UM/ Amherst and UM/Worcester . The original rate schedule 
was approved three years ago. Mr. Johnson recommends the new rates. 

After discussion, it was therefore proposed that the 
Board of Trustees vote: 

To approve the following rate schedule for engi- 
neering services for the firm of Gordon E. 
Ainsworth & Associates, Inc.: 



3499 



Rate Schedule 
for Gordon E . 
Ainsworth & 
Associates, 
Inc . 



3500 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Survey Coordinator 

Party Chief 

Instrument Man 

Chainman 

Rodman 

Draftsman 

Mathematician 

Abstractor 

Land Agent 

Clerical Personnel 

Electronic Computer 

Ozalid Prints 

Travel Expenses 

Office, Field & Misc. Exp. 



9 


.00 


per 


hour 


8 


.00 


per 


hour 


7 


00 


per 


hour 


7 


.00 


per 


hour 


5 


.50 


per 


hour 


8 


.00 


per 


hour 


8 


.00 


per 


hour 


7 


.00 


per 


hour 


7 


.50 


per 


hour 


5 


.00 


per 


hour 



20.00 per hour 

0.10 per sq. ft. 
At current State rate 
At Cost 



Mr. Lambert noted that he had been requested to approve 
plans for a "Log Cabin" to be constructed by students in the South- 
west Area to serve the multiple purposes of a revenue-producing 
shop and a "little Student Union." He will take the matter under 
advisement and report further at a later date. 



The meeting was adjourned at 4:10 p.m. 




Rbbert J. Mc( 
Secure t/ary, Board 




t 



tney 
Trustees 



I 



•IMITTEE 



3501 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

April 1, 1970, 12 Noon, Room 412, Statler Hilton Hotel, Boston 

PRESENT : Chairman Healey; Trustees Gordon, 

Pumphret, Troy; Secretary McCartney. 

From UM/A : Chancellor Tippo, 
Treasurer Johnson, Associate Provost 
Gluckstern, Professors Burke, Morris, 
Roberts; Messrs. Cadigan and Veale; 
Mrs. Hull. 

From UM/B : Chancellor Broderick; 
Professors Broderick, Brown, Goodwin, 
Knight; Messrs. Cass and Warren. 
From UM/W : Dean Soutter. 

Chairman Healey convened the meeting at 1:25 p.m. 

Members of the Faculty Senate, UM/Boston, were present for 
discussion of the Boston proposal on University governance. Pro- 
fessor Thomas Brown, Chairman of the Chancellor's Ad Hoc Committee 
on Governance, presented the report (Document T70-061) which pro- 
posed that a new University Senate replace the present Faculty Senate 
and the Student Council. "These have not worked well," he said, 
"due to size and to other factors." 

The University Senate as proposed would consist of repre- 
sentatives from the student body, the faculty, and the professional 
staff who hold named positions. The creation of a University Senate 
will not significantly alter the internal life of the University, 
Professor Brown stated. It is felt that this new form of governance 
will more effectively deal with such student problems as alienation 
and loneliness, which are inherent In an urban university situation. 
Thus participation in University governance is expected to be of 
great educational value to students. 

Student representatives will be chosen in two ways: (1) 
from declared majors in the various departments, and (2) from the 
student body at large. The total Senate membership is projected at 
125, and would be approximately 607> faculty and 407o students, with 
the following divisions: Faculty, 457,; faculty representatives at- 
large, 25%; students representing departments, 237, of the student 
ratio; and students at-large, 267o. There will be four representa- 
tives of the professional staff and two ex-officio memberships; the 
Dean and the Chancellor. In terms of class membership of the stu- 
dent segment, the division would be 507, seniors, 337> juniors, 177> 
sophomores plus graduate representatives. 

Page 10 of the document outlines departmental structures 
and constitutions as well as student participation in decision mak- 
ing, but does not detail procedures. This is left to the discretion 
of each department. 



Governance 
UM/Boston 

(Document 
T70-061) 



3502 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Trustee Gordon requested that the distinction between 
chairman and head be spelled out. Extensive discussion ensued on 
this point. Professor Brown defined a chairman as being "elected 
and possibly serving for a limited period of time. A head suggests 
a different relationship." 

Trustee Troy agreed that the distinction was a critical 
one. He felt that a head was more appointive than elective; also, 
that "there is the element of accountability." 

Professor Broderick stated that the UM/Boston proposal 
provides that the Chancellor may appoint a chairman if he finds 
that an elected chairman is unsuitable. Trustee Troy observed that 
the AAUP emphasized the importance of providing that the administra- 
tion may intervene if necessary. 

Trustee Gordon emphasized that the Chairmanship is an 
"important post," accountable to the department, and subject to 
veto by the Trustees under their responsibilities as defined in 
Chapter 75 of the Laws of the Commonwealth. Professor Broderick 
added that an elective chairman was the "best way to run a depart- 
ment." He also noted the provision which gives the Chancellor the 
right to appoint, if he felt this necessary, an acting departmental 
chairman for a period of two years. 

Chairman Healey stressed the importance of some symmetry 
in governance plans for individual campuses. He suggested that 
there should be a common philosophical basis for governance struc- 
tures within the system. Professor Brown stated that the Boston 
campus governance proposal derives from UM/Boston as it now exists 
and would be adaptable to change and to future University growth. 

It was noted that the Boston faculty had voted to accept 
the proposal, and that the student vote not to accept it had been a 
very close one. It was felt that resubmission of the proposal to th^ 
student body would produce a higher, more favorable vote. 
Chancellor Broderick said that, "for all practical purposes, this 
is the final document." Trustee Gordon commented that experience 
had shown the importance of having, where students are involved, 
the final definitive vote at hand. 

Chairman Healey asked if there was a basic student ob- 
jection to the unicameral concept. Mr. Warren, Student Council 
Vice-President, said "there was a great deal of objection to the 
election system," and that there had been "some confusion" over the 
proposal at the time the vote was taken. Professor Brown thought 
that -the difficulties with the students could probably be solved 
through better communication. 

Professor Brown then asked Professor Goodwin, Acting 
Chairman of the Department of Social Sciences, to comment "as a 
member of the loyal opposition." Professor Goodwin distributed 
copies of the "minority report" and his "personal minority report." 
(Attached) 



3503 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Summarizing, Professor Goodwin said that he felt that the 
proposed Senate was too Large; also, that there would be a decline 
in executive initiative under the proposal as written. It was 
noted that there had been division in the faculty vote on the pro- 
posal; also, that a motion calling for a moratorium on hiring until 
personnel procedures had been reviewed lost at a recent faculty 
meeting "by a tiny majority." 

Professor Goodwin stressed the importance of the executive 
function. He also expressed concern over the "one-man, one-vote" 
possibility in the decision making process that could be set up in 
personnel committees under this proposal. He did not feel that de- 
partments should be allowed an agency which could consist of 
"persons of similar rank having the power to make important de- 
cisions, including possibly tenure," which would concern another 
faculty member of comparable rank. 

Chairman Healey noted that the function and the responsi- 
bility of the Board includes "arbitration" to resolve differences. 
He said that he would personally like to review both the Faculty 
Senate Report and the Minority Report, as a basis for judgment. 
The Board, he said, will attempt to understand both points of view. 

The discussion reverted to the question of chairman vs. 
head. Chancellor Broderick stated that he thought the Board had 
specified "chairman." "UM/Boston," he said, "has never had a head. 
He described the duties of a chairman as being a great responsibili 
ty, subject only to the veto of the Chancellor and the Board. 
There was general agreement that this question had been the subject 
of much debate, and that it was of crucial concern to large numbers 
of faculty members . 

Chairman Healey pointed out that the Board must be in- 
volved in formulation of policies at every level, and not pre- 
sented with a fait accompli. He urged further study of the Boston 
proposal by the proper Trustee committees. He referred to page 
three of the proposal: "subject to final authority," he said, 
"applies to all sections of the document." 

Reference was made to the amount of time devoted to Uni- 
versity Senate activity required of the student representatives. 
It was pointed out that they are not being paid, as are the faculty 
Mr. Warren stated that despite a large contribution of student time, 
absence of remuneration would not be a deterring factor. 

At Chairman Healey' s request, Mr. Warren agreed to assume 
responsibility for submitting to the Board a communication indi- 
cating specifically the student comments and objections to the pro- 
posal as written. He indicated that the students prime concerns 
were: (1) selection procedures, and (2) apportionment; - the 
students are "not satisfied with 40%." 

The UM/Boston representatives then left the meeting. 



3504 



COMMITTEE 

Governance 

UM/ Amherst 

(Document 
T70-062A) 



UM/Worcester 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Professor Bruce Morris, Chairman of the Faculty Senate 
Committee on Governance, reviewed the UM/ Amherst proposal on 
Faculty Participation in University Governance (Document T70-062A - 
Revised) . He noted that the committee had been working on coordi- 
nation of the proposal for a year. The Faculty Senate unanimously 
approved the proposal in June, 1969. Subsequently, it has been 
before the Trustee Committee on Faculty and Educational Policy and 
the Executive Committee on more than one occasion. At the last 
meeting -- January 19 -- it had been agreed that Professor Morris 
and Chancellor Tippo would work together to make the suggested 
changes. The revised document is now before this committee for 
consideration. 

There followed brief pertinent comment by Professor 
Morris, and others, on each numbered paragraph of the UM/ Amherst 
governance proposal. These have been set forth in a separate in- 
formal memorandum and provided to the Chancellor and faculty repre- 
sentatives persent at the meeting. A copy is also attached to 
these minutes. 

A major change incorporated was redefinition on page 5 of 
the distinction between department head and department chairman, as 
presented by Associate Provost Gluckstern. The text of (comment 
concerning this definition) is also included in the memorandum 
attached to these minutes. 

Chairman Healey expressed some reservation over the possi- 
ble results of developing a new governance system at this stage of 
the university system reorganization. Professor Morris replied 
that the proposal should not affect the reorganization as many of 
the policies are already in effect. He pointed out that changes 
involving increased student participation are also being proposed 
by UM/Boston. Chancellor Tippo commented that he thought there 
would actually be "very little change" if UM/ Amherst adopted a Uni- 
versity Senate. 

Dean Soutter stated that he "supported very strongly" the 
principle that UM/Worcester would not be influenced by decisions 
made elsewhere. "The Medical School is unique," he said, adding 
that Worcester would have department heads. 

Professor Morris emphasized the importance of prompt 
Board action on this proposal. He said the proposal reflects, 
essentially, the conservative faculty position, and there has alread|y 
been much delay. He strongly urged action at the April meeting of 
the Board. 

There was further general discussion of the implications 
of adoption of a broad policy statement at the present stage or re- 
organization. Chairman Healey expressed the feeling that a new 
President should have an opportunity to be consulted on such matters 
of policy. He also questioned the necessity of immediate action 
"if these policies are in effect anyway." Chancellor Tippo 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

observed that Board decisions had recently been made in the areas 
of student proposals, Black Studies, and other matters; also, that 
all provisions of the proposal are essentially current procedures 
and all are desirable. 

Trustee Troy expressed his support of the proposal, say- 
ing that it has had extensive and careful review, and that it was 
"sensible, and based on experience." He felt that the UM/Boston 
statement, having been presented much more recently, would require 
further consideration. 

Chancellor Tippo suggested that the UM/Amherst proposal, 
as it affects only Amherst, be approved in principle on April 22. 
Such action, he said, would allow the Amherst campus to operate 
under these policies pending final approval by the Board. 

Chairman Healey expressed agreement with the Chancellor's 
suggestion. He stressed, however, that the situation must be con- 
sidered fluid and that there could be a future reconsideration of 
governance policies within the system framework. 

On motion made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
the Faculty Senate UM/Amherst Proposal on 
Faculty Participation in University Govern- 
ment (Document T70-062A) be adopted in 
principle, pending final approval by the 
Board. 

Turning to the question of Honorary Degrees and Commence - 
ment, Chairman Healey requested Mr. David Veale, Senior Class 
President, UM/A, for his comments. 

Mr. Veale stated that, while he considered that his pro- 
posal to the Board (November, 1969) regarding changes in Commence- 
ment policies was a "conservative" statement, he had now reviewed 
Trustee Lyons ' proposal and found it superior except for two points 
First, it does not specify seniors for membership on the honorary 
degree screening (Commencement) committee; second, regarding costs, 
seniors are paying the fee - not freshmen and sophomores. It was 
pointed out, that as preparations for Commencement start a year in 
advance, the students involved would be members of the junior class. 
Mr. Veale said that a committee made up of two faculty, two Trustees 
and three students would be acceptable. Chairman Healey proposed 
other arrangements for consideration such as a screening committee 
basically of the Trustee Executive Committee operating under pro- 
cedures as set up in January 1967, but with student representation 
Decisions so made, Chairman Healey said, would be by consensus, 
not by majority. The possibility of a committee consisting of 
three Trustees and one student which work toward a consensus was 
also discussed. 



3505 



Honorary 
Degrees and 
Commencement 
UM/Amherst 



3506 



COMMITTEE 



UM System 
Offices - 
Boston 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Other arrangements for a Commencement Committee were also 
discussed, with general agreement that any committee should work 
toward a consensus of opinion. Mr. Veale said that he understood 
the traditions and the necessity of all deliberations being kept 
completely confidential. He felt that students would accept this 
responsibility. Chairman Healey expressed hope for a decision on 
Commencement procedures at the April meeting. 

Mr. Cadigan presented a study made on possible space 
available in Boston for presidential offices. It was agreed that 
the search would be limited to downtown Boston as far out as 
Kenmore Square. Periods of time for leases, and possible options 
for acquiring additional space were also discussed. Treasurer 
Johnson pointed out that the Government Center area had many ad- 
vantages, including accessibility of parking space under the state 
office building. Ultimate projections for space needs were 
10,170 sq. ft., with an immediate anticipated need of 5,000 sq. ft. 
In any case, expansion possibilities should be taken into account 
and provided for. 



The meeting was adjourned at 3:50 p.m. 





Robert J. McCar 
Secretarw/ Board of T 




F 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON FACULTY AND 
EDUCATIONAL POLICY 

April 13, 1970, 10:30 a.m., Room 162, Parker House, Boston 



PRESENT : Chairman Troy, President Lederle; 
Trustees Boyden, Lyons, Maginnis, 
Olken 

From UM/A : Chancellor Tippo, Associate 
Provosts Allen and Gluckstern; Deans 
Appley, Shapiro, Smith, Spielman; 
Assistant Deans Gugin and Venman; Pro- 
fessors Fliess, Fox, Francis, Hayes, 
Howards, Jones, Korson, Olim; Dr. Barbara 
Burn, Mrs. Hull 

From UM/B : Dean Gagnon 

Chairman Troy convened the meeting at 10:45 a.m. and in- 
vited presentation of Agenda Item 1 - Proposed Amendments to 
Trustee Document T68-060, Policy for Certain Additional Pro - 
fessional Services . Assistant Dean of Administration Venman re- 
viewed the proposal. In response to increasing demands on the 
University in the areas of continuing education and public service, 
Dean Venman said, it will be necessary to modify the present policj 
on additional compensation. The proposed modifications would allov< 
a faculty member to be paid up to ten percent of his annual salary 
for participation in continuing education or public service pro- 
grams which he might undertake beyond his regularly scheduled 
duties. Such participation would be carefully controlled and woulc 
be contingent upon approval by the appropriate department head and 
Dean. 

The ensuing discussion covered various aspects of the 
proposed programs, which will be administered by a Dean (or 
Director) of Continuing Education, who is as yet unappointed. 
Activities are expected to include credit extension courses, both 
on and off the campus (regular University courses at times and/or 
places outside of the normal class schedule, such as evening 
school) and non-credit courses both on and off the campus (con- 
ferences, institutes, short courses, workshops and lectures). 
Fees will be worked out to cover all costs and overhead of the 
programs involved. All additional salaries will be paid strictly 
on an overload basis and not from state funds, with regular Uni- 
versity commitments having first priority. Future coordination 
of these programs for all campuses is anticipated through the 
University's system office. 

Dean Smith, of the School of Business Administration, 
commented on the necessity of faculty interaction in the business 
community, especially at the professional school level. President 
Lederle termed the program "long overdue," and expressed 



350? 



Continuing 
Education 
Amendments - 
T68-060 

Policy for 
Certain Addi- 
tional Pro- 
fessional 
Services 



3508 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

satisfaction with the controls planned for the program. He noted 

that, with the Campus Center now becoming a reality, the University 

would at last be providing this essential public service to the 
people of the Commonwealth. 

The proposed amendment is as follows: 

PROPOSED AMENDMENTS TO TRUSTEE DOCUMENT T68-060 
POLICY ON COMPENSATION FOR CERTAIN ADDITIONAL PRO- 
FESSIONAL SERVICES 

Section II. Continuing Education and Public Service 

1. Members of the faculty are permitted to participate, 
with or without compensation, in programs of a continuing 
education or public service nature requiring their pro- 
fessional services, provided such participation conforms 
to the following stated principles: 

(a) Such services shall be performed in programs 
of a continuing education or public service nature 
which are sponsored by the University, and no such 
faculty member shall so participate without the 
prior written consent of the head of his department 
and the dean of his college or school. A record of 
all such participation, including the amount and 
nature of services and rate of compensation, if any, 
entailed, shall be reported to the Chancellor, as 
the case may be. Subject to the requirements else- 
where herein contained, services so approved may 

be performed at any time during the calendar year. 

(b) All such services and participation shall be 
in addition to and exclusive of, the regular 
academic and scholarly duties and services to be 
performed by such faculty member, as assigned from 
time to time by the University. 

(c) Compensation, if any, for participation in 
such programs shall be at the rate established by 
the Dean of Continuing Education with the approval 
of the Chancellor and the President. A faculty 
member may receive, during or with respect to any 
calendar year, such compensation in an amount up 
to ten (10%) percent of his annual salary for 
regularly assigned duties; and a faculty member on 
a calendar year appointment may receive, during 

or with respect to any such year, such compensation 
in any amount up to twelve (12%) percent of his 
annual salary for such duties. 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

(d) Compensation permitted hereunder shall be 
specifically in addition to that compensation 
allowed for research activities under Section I. 
Compensation so permitted shall be considered, 
however, by deans and department heads in acting 
upon requests by faculty members for permission to 
participate, or to perform, outside services of a 
professional nature, with or without compensation, 
as described in Section III. 

(e) Notwithstanding any other provision con- 
tained in this Section II, participation in pro- 
grams of a continuing education and public ser- 
vice nature, as herein provided, shall at all 
times be subject to such further rules of uniform 
application as the Dean of Continuing Education, 
with the approval of the Chancellor and the Presi- 
dent, shall from time to time promulgate. 

After further brief discussion, it was moved, seconded 



and 



VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees 
that the proposed Amendments: Policy 
for Certain Additional Professional Ser- 
vices (Document T68-060) be approved. 

Agenda Item 2 - Proposal to Convert 12-month Contracts 
to Academic Year in College of Agriculture - was presented by Dean 
Spielman and Professors Francis and Hayes of the College of Agri- 
culture. At issue was the request of the faculty of the College of 
Agriculture to be allowed the option of academic or calendar year 
appointments, where circumstances permit. Dean Spielman stated 
that the 157o differential for calendar year appointments has been 
steadily decreasing since autonomy, while the advantages of the 
academic year appointments have been increasing. Some 95% of the 
faculty responding to a questionnaire have indicated that this 
option would be desirable, he said. Many new appointments are 
being made on the academic year basis; of the total College of 
Agriculture faculty, 48 are now on academic year appointment and 
134 are on calendar year appointment. A report (May 16, 1968) has 
been made by the Faculty Affairs Committee of the Faculty Senate 
which recommends conversion of the faculty appointments to an 
academic year basis upon request. Other studies on this subject 
have been done within the College of Agriculture. 

Professor Hayes presented a chart showing percentage 
differences between academic and calendar year salaries for the 
period 1962-1970. This chart "indicates a trend" downward, Pro- 
fessor Hayes said, from the 1962 15% differential to a minus figure 
of 0.87o in some salaries. 



3509 



Proposal to 

Convert 

Salaries 

College of 

Agriculture 

to Academic 

Year 



3510 



COMMITTEE 



Freiburg 
Budget 



Human 
Development 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Much discussion ensued on this analysis and on the com- 
plexities of the salary situation in Agriculture. It was agreed 
that the College of Agriculture presents an "atypical" situation, 
involving as it does extension and other specialized work, split 
assignments, definitions of faculty loads and tripartite budgeting. 

Chancellor Tippo pointed out that many other University 
appointments are also made on a 12-month basis, in such departments 
as Health, Physical Education, Government Research, Water Resources, 
the Labor Center and the Medical School. 

Dean Spielman is to meet with Director of the Budget Louis 
Morrell for further analysis of figures relating to faculty salaries 
within the College of Agriculture. Action will be deferred pending 
further study of the problem. 

Agenda Item 3 - Freiburg Budget - was reviewed by Dr. 
Barbara Burn, Director of International Programs and Dr. Peter 
Fliess, Chairman of the Freiburg Committee. Dr. Burn pointed out 
the continued growth of the program, with the faculty being in- 
creased to 5 next year (3 this year) and with student enrollment 
projected at 40 next year (now 23). The budget for fiscal year '71 
is projected at $30,000, an increase of $6,500. Twenty-five hundred 
dollars hoped for from the Graduate School will not be forthcoming, 
Dean Appley said, as Graduate School funds from federal sources have 
been cut by 407 o . 

Dr. Fliess reviewed the Freiburg Committee's memorandum of 
April 9, 1970 which had been distributed. The memorandum covers 
(1) increased budget projections for 1972, and (2) long-range deci- 
sions which will be required on the proposed partnership agreement 
with the University of Freiburg. It was also pointed out that the 
program should be incorporated into a regular program, probably with 
in Arts and Sciences, so that the present budget uncertainties could 
be avoided. 

After further general discussion, and on motion made and 
seconded, it was 

VOTED: To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
the Freiburg budget for fiscal year 1971 
be approved in principle subject to the 
availability of funds. 

Agenda Item 4 - Major in Human Development - was discussed 
by Dr. Ellis Olim, Head of the Department of Human Development in 
the School of Home Economics. In addition to the undergraduate fielc 
of specialization in Child Development now offered in this depart- 
ment, an additional area of Human Development is proposed. Inter- 
disciplinary in nature, this major is designed for students in- 
terested in Human Development as a social science, and for prepara- 
tion for graduate work in the social sciences. 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

No budget increase is necessary, as the program is 
essentially a reclustering of existing courses. 

Following discussion of the proposal, motion was made and 
seconded, and it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
the proposal to establish a Major in the 
Department of Human Development, School of 
Home Economics, be approved. 

Agenda Item 5 - ROTC Recommendations - was presented by 
Professor Phillips Jones, Chairman of the Military Affairs Sub- 
committee of the Faculty Senate and by Associate Provost Jeremiah 
Allen. 

Dr. Jones reviewed the Reports of the Subcommittee to 
the Faculty Senate on October 23, 1969 and January 29, 1970, and 
the subsequent action by the Faculty Senate (attached) . 

Professor Jones noted that there were four major points 
covered in these reports: (1) academic credit courses (2) the 
overall structure of the program - 2 vs. 4 years (3) academic rank 
for the faculty and (4) payment of the full costs of the program 
by the federal government, thus ending the current state subsidy 
of some $30,000 annually for maintenance and other support costs 
of the program. 

Provost Allen referred to his memorandum of April 8, 1970 
in which it is suggested that the administration be authorized to 
give the Army and Air Force formal notice to the effect that the 
University wishes (a) to terminate the present contracts as of the 
end of the academic year, 1970-71, and (b) to negotiate new con- 
tracts between now and the end of the academic year, 1970-71, to 
be effective at the beginning of the academic year, 1971-72. 

There was extensive discussion on the subject following 
which it was moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
the administration be authorized to notify 
the Army and the Air Force of intent to 
terminate the present contracts at the end 
of the academic year, 1970-71 and to nego- 
tiate new contracts before the end of the 
academic year 1970-71, to be effective at 
the beginning of the academic year 1971-72. 

Following a recess for lunch, Chairman Troy requested 
Dean Shapiro to present Agenda Item 6 - Reorganization of the 
College of Arts and Sciences . 



3511 



ROTC 
Recommendations 



Reorganization 
of College of 
Arts & Sciences 



3512 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Terming his remarks a "progress report," Dean Shapiro 
noted that he had last reported on reorganization of the College of 
Arts and Sciences at the close of the last academic year. Since 
that time a mail vote has been taken of the faculty of Arts and 
Sciences on the subject of tripartite separation, he said. Support 
was indicated for the administration's proposal for division into 
three colleges: Humanities and Fine Arts, Behavioral and Social 
Sciences, and Natural Sciences and Mathematics. There has been 
further support of the proposal to create, rather than Colleges, 
three faculties within the College of Arts and Sciences. Each 
faculty would have a Dean, but there would be no "super-Dean." Dean 
Shapiro noted that of the 657o of the faculty voting on reorganiza- 
tion proposal, 59% favor this last proposal and 41% expressed dis- 
approval. 

There has been much concern, Dean Shapiro said, over bud- 
get apportionment and the fact that the natural sciences are felt to 
attract a higher than proportionate share of funds. Studies have 
been made, however, Dean Shapiro said, which prove that this is not 
the case. 

President Lederle asked if student sentiment on this 
question had been determined. Dean Shapiro said that discussions 
had been held in 1969 with Bruce Balboni, then President of the Stu- 
dent Senate. Dean Shapiro, however, felt that "students had no real 
concern - they could see no effect on their academic program." 

Professor Korson raised the question of procedures in de- 
termining placement of departments within divisions of the College 
of Arts and Sciences, especially if controversy existed. There was 
agreement that this problem would need study. 

The committee then went into executive session to discuss 
two personnel matters. 

The meeting was adjourned at 2:35 p.m. 




Rober 
Secretary, 





McCart 
(bard of Trust^ 



> 



» 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF COMMITTEE ON BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS 

April 15, 1970, 10:00 a.m., BBC Project Office, 711 Boylston St. 

Boston, Mass. 



PRESENT: 



Chairman Haigis, President Lederle; 
Trustees Knowles, Maginnis , Pumphret; 
Treasurer Johnson 



From UM/A 



Mrs. Hull 
From UM/B 



From UM/W 



Mr. Albert, Mr. Littlefield, 
Chancellor Broderick, Mr. 



O'Brien, Professor Weaver 



Dean Soutter 



From McKee-Berger-Mansueto, Inc: 
Mr. Armijo 

Representatives of the following archi- 
tectural firms: 

Anderson, Beckwith and Haible 

Cambridge Seven Associates, Inc. 

Haldeman and Goransson Associates, Inc. 

Harry Weese Associates 

Geometries, Inc. 

Marvin E. Goody, John M. Clancy & 
Associates, Inc. 

Mr. Harris: Representing the residents 
of Columbia Point 



The meeting was convened by Chairman Haigis at 10:05 a.m. 

Dean Soutter reported on Medical School progress. Shaw 
Building renovations are going well. There are problems, however, 
with the site work involving unforeseen ledge conditions, which 
will increase costs by some 467 . It will be necessary to take 
funds for this emergency situation from movable equipment alloca- 
tions, Dean Soutter said. Another site problem which has de- 
veloped requires re-routing of gas lines for a culvert. 

There is a continuing problem with the light shaft in 
the library. This element of the design has been condemned by the 
Department of Public Safety. Redesign of the library, Dean Souttei 
said, is most undesirable and would obstruct the upper floor as 
well as carrels and halls. Much architectural precedent exists, 
however, within the state for buildings of similar design and Dean 
Soutter is hopeful that the problem can be resolved. Dean Soutter 
was authorized by the Committee to confer with the Attorney General 
on the legality of the Department of Public Safety's condemnation 
of the light shaft design. 

Treasurer Johnson requested confirmation of recommenda- 
tions made at the meeting of the Committee on Buildings and Grounds 
on March 31 , on the following matters: 



3513 



Medical 

School 

Progress 



Medical 
School 
Library 
Design 



3514 



COMMITTEE 

Easement for 
Road - UM/A 
Married 
Student 
Housing 



East Pleasant 
Street - 
By-pass Road 
Amherst 



Rate Schedule 
Gordon E. 
Ainsworth, Inc. 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

(1) Easement for Road - Married Student Housing UM/A - Cohn 
Property . 

After discussion, it was moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
the offer be accepted of an easement from 
Louis R. Cohn for the purpose of a road 
across the westerly portion of Parcel 1, 
page 8A as shown in the Town of Amherst 
Atlas - said easement to be a minimum of 
100 feet in width and lying west and parallel 
to the Western Massachusetts Electric Company 
power line with the provision that said Louis 
R. Cohn may have access from the Presidential 
Apartments to said road when constructed; 
provided, a temporary road east of said 
power line is approved until the permanent 
road is constructed. 

(2) East Pleasant Street By-pass Road Location - UM/A 

After discussion, it was moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
the preliminary layout and plan for the 
East Pleasant Street by-pass road be 
approved as presented to the meeting. 

(3) New Rate Schedules for the Engineering Services of Gordon 
E. Ainsworth & Associates, Inc. retained by UM/A and UM/W . 

On motion made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
the following rate schedule for engineering 
services for the firm of Gordon E. Ainsworth 
& Associates, Inc. be approved: 



} 



Survey Coordinator 


$9.00 


per hour 


Party Chief 


8.00 


per hour 


Instrument Man 


7.00 


per hour 


Chairman 


7.00 


per hour 


Rodman 


5.50 


per hour 


Draftsman 


8.00 


per hour 


Mathematician 


8.00 


per hour 


Abstractor 


7.00 


per hour 


Land Agent 


7.50 


per hour 


Clerical Personnel 


5.00 


per hour 



Electronic Computer 

Ozalid Prints 

Travel Expenses 

Office, Field, & Misc. Exp. 



20.00 per hour 
0.10 per sq. ft. 

At current State rate 
At Cost 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Chairman Haigis next turned to Review and Approval of 
Proposed Rent Increase Schedule - UM/A. Commendation was ex- 
pressed for the work of the President's Committee on Room Rents 
and Fees, chaired by Mr. Albert. 

Mr. Pumphret noted one weakness in the present program, 
and in the Rent Committee's proposals, in that provision has not 
been made to create a reserve fund for major building renovations 
and repairs. Thought should be given, Mr. Pumphret suggested, to 
the percentage of M&O funds that should be set aside for this 
purpose. 

The Treasurer also noted that the suggestion has been 
made to charge a higher per-day rate for conferees than the per-day 
student rate. He expressed agreement with the suggestion, but said 
that he could make no recommendations at the present on an in- 
creased conferee room rate as, word has just been received that the 
Faculty Senate Committee on Continuing Education wishes to be in- 
volved in discussions on this matter. 

The recommendation made by the Rent Committee and con- 
curred in by Treasurer Johnson regarding Brett and Gorman Houses 
(Project #1), now included in the "new" dormitory rate schedule, 
will be considered in the "traditional" grouping in the revised 
rent and fee schedule. (Attached) 



After further brief discussion, it was moved, seconded 



and 



VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
Brett and Gorman Houses be included in the 
rent schedules for traditional dormitories. 

Chairman Haigis referred to the petition received from 
Central Area residents at the March 31 meeting of the Buildings and 
Grounds Committee, in which the statement is made that rent in- 
creases as then proposed would "force hundreds of students to leave 
school." Discussion of state aid for students ensued, but it was 
pointed out that the amount of state aid has not been increased; an|d 
that it must be shared with UM/Boston, as well as among a student 
enrollment which has increased by 2,000. There was agreement, how 
ever, that every effort will be made to provide financial aid in 
individual cases, if it becomes necessary. 

Mr. Albert asked Treasurer Johnson if the revised rates 
now reflected the income estimates for Arnold and Mills Houses if 
used as residences. Mr. Johnson replied that, while there was 
agreement in principle that the Rent Committee's argument on this 
matter was correct, there were now no state funds available which 
could be used to compensate dormitory accounts for the non-residenc^ 
use of Mills and Arnold. 



515 



Review - 
Proposed Rent 
Schedule 

UM/Amherst 



Conferee 
Room Rate 
UM/Amherst 



Rent Scheduli 

Brett and 
Gorman House; 



Petition re 
Rents - 
Central 
Residence 
Area 



Arnold and 
Mills Houses 
Income 



3516 



Student 
Security 
Deposits 
Interest 



COMMITTEE 



Income 



Hodgkins 

Cove 

Property 

Approval 
Preliminary 
Plans and 
Specifications 
Columbia Point 



Savin Hill 
Yacht Club 
Property 



Library 

Columbia 

Point 

Preliminary 
Plans 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Income on security deposits, however, has been included 
in the revised schedule, however, Mr. Johnson noted. 

It was also noted that there has .been no action by the 
Student Senate on possible state subsidies during the requested 
month's delay on the rent question. Action by the Board cannot be 
delayed beyond the April meeting. 



After further general discussion, it was moved, seconded 



and 



VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
the Schedule of Room Rents and Fees (Docu- 
ment T70-090) be approved as revised. 
(Attached) 

The Treasurer reported good progress in acquiring Hodgkins 
Cove property in Gloucester for the Marine Science programs. The 
U of M Foundation, Inc. should complete the purchase soon. 

The Chairman next requested presentation of Preliminary 
Plans and Specifications - Columbia Point . 

Mr. O'Brien noted that a land- taking of Boston College 
High School property may be necessary in order to provide an access 
road to Columbia Point for construction. Easement procedures are 
also being considered, he said, but Boston College prefers a land- 
taking. It is expected that this matter may come before the full 
Board at the April meeting. 

Mr. O'Brien also requested support of proposed legisla- 
tion to amend House Bill No. 3836, concerning the Savin Hill Yacht 
Club Property. This legislation is the result of agreements worked 
out between UM/Boston and Yacht Club representatives for protection 
from undesirable development of the property. 

After discussion, it was moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
legislation to amend House Bill No. 3836 - 
re Savin Hill Yacht Club Property - be 
supported subject to approval by University 
legal counsel. 

Preliminary plans and specifications for Phase I - 
Columbia Point - were presented by representatives of the six archi- 
tectural firms now at work on the project. 

Library plans were presented by Mr. Michael Lysec of Harry 
Weese & Associates. No major changes have been made since the 
initial presentation of the schematic phase on March 6, 1970. Dean 
Belluschi has suggested continuing study on a problem related to the 
plaza area. Estimates are under budget at $17,600,000. 



r 



I 



L 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Mr. McAdam noted that the library is the prominent build- 
ing on the campus and expressed satisfaction with the architect's 
design. Mr. McAdam also noted that the Weese office is basically- 
leading the way in selection of materials to achieve compatability 
in the common areas . 

There is to be a meeting on May 7 with Dean Belluschi and 
representatives of the Sasaki firm relating to materials. The meet 
ing will be held in the BBC Project Office, where samples of all 
materials to be used will be on display. Mrs. Knowles is to attend 
this meeting. 

After further discussion, it was moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
the preliminary design for the Library - 
Columbia Point - as presented by the archi- 
tectural firm of Harry Weese & Associates 
and as detailed in Document T70-094 be 
approved at a budget figure not to exceed 
$20,000,000. 

Central Supply and Service Building plans were presented 
by Mr. Leslie Moore for Geometries, Inc. Mr. Moore particularly 
noted that the roof of the Service Building is actually an exten- 
sion of the Plaza, and that landscaping is planned for the half of 
the roof which will be visible from the Administration Building. 
Plans also provide' for mass transit links to the campus, although 
extension of the transit system to Columbia Point is not now a 
certainty. 

Chairman Haigis pointed out 'that this building is also 
the main entrance to the campus, and expressed the hope that funds 
could be found for landscaping of the entire roof. 

After discussion, it was moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
the preliminary design for the Central 
Supply and Service Building - Columbia 
Point - as presented by the architectural 
firm of Geometries, Inc. and as detailed 
in Document T70-095 be approved at a 
budget figure not to exceed $3,400,000. 

Following a brief luncheon recess, the Chairman recon- 
vened the meeting at 1:00 p.m. 

A matter of concern to the residents of Columbia Point 
was discussed by Chancellor Broderick and Mr. Harris, who repre- 
sented the Columbia Point residents. 



3517 



Central Supply 
& Service 
Building - 
Columbia Point 



Residents 
Proposal ■ 
Columbia 
Point 



3518 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Chancellor Broderick reviewed the matter of the disposi- 
tion of some 22 acres of formerly City-owned land at Columbia Point, 
which has been the subject of much discussion and negotiation be- 
tween the City and UM/Boston officials. Legislation is now pro- 
posed which would extend the time of the original understanding be- 
tween UM/Boston and the City with regard to possible development of 
the property for housing. 

At issue with the residents of Columbia Point is the point 
that, if additional legislation is filed, it specify that the land 
be used in addition to housing for recreational, and other purposes. 
Mr. Harris said that the proposed "other" uses would be non-profit, 
non- industrial facilities such as a "cooperative store" and a commu- 
nity tutorial center - the latter probably staffed with UM/Boston 
personnel. The Columbia Point residents, Mr. Harris said, "are not 
interested in having factories or retail establishments on the 
property. " 

Chancellor Broderick, to clearly define the issue, said 
that his understanding then was that Mr. Harris was saying that the 
people of Columbia Point need facilities beyond housing, beyond 
recreation; that would be non-industrial and non-profit facilities; 
and that Mr. Harris was also saying that these facilities would be 
subject to approval both by the people of Columbia Point and the 
Trustees of the University of Massachusetts. Mr. Harris said that 
the Chancellor's statement was correct. 

Much discussion ensued on this matter. President Lederle 
and Chancellor Broderick emphasized the desire of UM/Boston to be a 
"good neighbor." 

General Maginnis expressed the opinion that the over- 
riding consideration should be whatever was in the best interest of 
the Commonwealth and the community; and that the interests of the 
City and of private housing development should be secondary. 

In regard to the original agreement with the City of 
Boston, which allowed the option of reversion of this land to the 
City if private interests could be found for development of housing, 
President Lederle stated that the University had a moral commitment 
to honor the original agreement. He felt strongly, however, that no 
extension of time should be made beyond the time limit of the 
original agreement with the City. 

Mr. McAdam, Mr. O'Brien and President Lederle expressed 
concern over the inadequate space at Columbia Point for campus de- 
velopment and for community recreational areas. Mr. Harris pointed 
out the similarities between the best interests of UM/Boston and the 
people of Columbia Point. 

Chairman Haigis, noting the many complexities of the situa 
tion, stated that the Committee on Buildings and Grounds would take 
the matter under consideration, for subsequent recommendation on 
action to the full Board. 



I 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Returning to Review of Preliminary Plans - Columbia 
Point - Administration Building plans were presented by Mr. John 
Clancy of Clancy and Goody Associates. Mr. Clancy noted that there 
had been no essential change in the plans since the initial pre- 
sentation of schematics, and pointed out details of space alloca- 
tions within the building. Estimates, at $5,540,000 are below 
budget. 



After discussion, and on motion made and seconded, it 



was 



VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
the preliminary design for the Administra- 
tion Building - Columbia Point - as pre- 
sented by the architectural firm of Marvin 
E. Goody, John M. Clancy & Associates, Inc. 
and as detailed in Document T70-096 be 
approved at a budget figure not to exceed 
$5,560,000. 

Science Center plans were presented by Mr. William 
Haible of Anderson, Beckwith and Haible. There had been no major 
changes in design of this building since review on March 6. There 
was discussion of the exhaust systems for this building, and for 
the project in general, with Chairman Haigis expressing great con- 
cern over the pollution factor. 

After discussion, it was moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
the preliminary design for the Science 
Center as presented by the architectural 
firm of Anderson, Beckwith and Haible and 
as detailed in Document T70-097 be approved 
at a budget figure not to exceed $23,000,000. 

College 020 plans were presented by Mr. Paul Dietrich of 
Cambridge Seven Associates. The basic concept is unchanged since 
initial presentation, although revisions have been made in space 
arrangements. Window height has been lowered in classrooms to 
take advantage of the view. The library is now outboard. 

After discussion, it was moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
the preliminary design for the College 020 
as presented by the architectural firm of 
Cambridge Seven Associates, Inc. and as de- 
tailed in Document T70-098 be approved at 
a budget figure not to exceed $20,000,000. 



3519 



Administration 
Building - 
Columbia 
Point 



Science 
Center - 
Columbia 
Point 



College 020 
Columbia 



3520 



College 010 

Columbia 
Point 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

College 010 plans were presented by Mr. Jacobovitz of 
Haldeman & Goransson Associates, Inc. There have been some problems 
of compatibility with other buildings, it was noted, and with some 
elements of the vertical design. Dean Belluschi has suggested 
changes. 

After discussion, it was moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
the preliminary design for College 010 be 
approved as presented by the architectural 
firm of Haldeman & Goransson and as de- 
tailed in Document T70-099 subject to in- 
clusion of brick facing at the grading 
level and including redesign of vertical 
elements at the grading level in accordance 
with Dean Belluschi' s comments, and at a 
budget figure not to exceed $20,000,000. 

The meeting was adjourned at 3:10 p.m. 





J. McCartney/ 
Board of Trustees 



I 



I 



I 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON STUDENT ACTIVITIES 

April 16, 1970, Board Room, Whitmore Admin. Bldg. , UM/ Amherst 

PRESENT : Chairman Rowland, President Lederle; 
Trustees Olken, Croce 

From UM/A : Chancellor Tippo, Dr. 
Bromery, Dean Field, Associate Dean 
Fitzpatrick, Mrs. Hull 

Student Representatives UM/A from : 

Student Senate : Glenn Elters, Staff Sheehan 

Butterfield : Richard Hanson, Sigrid Salmela 

Prince : Paul Johnson 

Gorman : Bob Freeman 

Greenough : John Tierney 

Lewis: Jane Cullinan, Joanne Fisher 

Chairman Rowland convened the meeting at 11:05 a.m. and 
opened discussion on Coeducational Dormitories , noting that addi- 
tional proposals have now been submitted. Chancellor Tippo was 
requested to review the policies on coeducational dormitories as 
set up in 1969 under the Greenough proposal, which has been in 
operation since January 26, 1970. 

Chancellor Tippo noted that the Greenough dormitory 
operates under the following five-point Board of Trustee policy: 
(1) voluntary - no student may be forced out (2) meetings of stu- 
dents, parents, and administrators must be held prior to approval 
of any proposal (3) written permission for those under 21 (4) men 
and women on separate floors (5) no freshmen. 

Mr. Tierney reported on the Greenough experiment to date. 
Many projects have been undertaken by the Greenough residents: 
room painting and furniture painting and repairing, and painting 
of murals in the halls. There has been a "spring program" of 
special courses involving twelve faculty members; camping and 
hiking trips and maple- sugar making; as well as a guest program 
with other colleges. Asked about problems, Mr. Tierney said that 
the major one had been in working out an acceptable governmental 
structure. This is still being worked on, he said, and "other 
problems have been minor." 

A proposal is being presented, Mr. Tierney said, to have 
men and women on the same floors in adjacent rooms, rather than 
the present alternate floor arrangement. Consensus would be Quakei 
style, by corridor, in such an arrangement. 

The Butterfield Proposal was presented by Richard Hanson 
and Sigrid Salmela. The proposal is based on three main assump- 
tions, Mr. Hanson said: (1) physical arrangements of Butterfield ■ 
2 bathrooms on each floor (2) the Greenough results re segregation 



3521 



Coeducational 
Dormitories 



Five-Point 
Policy - 
Coeducational 
Dormitory 



Greenough 
Report 



Butterfield 



3522 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSKTY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

by floor and (3) the fact that the vast majority of students who 
have worked on this proposal prefer a room-to-room basis. 

Discussing advantages of a room-to-room arrangement, Mr. 
Hanson commented on the "artificial relationships which are created 
in a dating atmosphere. He added that "under this arrangement a 
dormitory floor would then consist of just people." Mr. Hanson 
noted that all-male dormitories have much higher damage rates than 
the Greenough experiment would indicate for a coeducational dormi- 
tory, where damage is relatively non-existent. 

Miss Salmela said that she had discussed the proposal with 
her parents, and with other girls, and that they favored non-segre- 
gated floors. Chancellor Tippo asked, "Your parents don't object to 
the idea of adjacent rooms?" Miss Salmela replied that they did not 

The Chancellor pointed out the very serious aspect of the 
public relations factor in the situation, and the fact that there 
had already been much adverse public reaction to the existing 
liberalized dormitory rules. 

Mr. Hanson noted the other advantages which would make 
Butterfield especially adaptable to coeducational living: small - 
140 people total and the existence of good public areas. Butterfield 
had had many dorm activities this year, he said, such as a skating 
rink and a rock festival, a dorm newspaper, dark room, art figure 
and modern dance classes. 

A town-meeting form of government is proposed for Butter- 
field for all residents and University personnel connected with the 
dormitory. It is hoped that Butterfield would have many of its own 
classes, as well as its own dining facilities. Mr. Hanson said, 
"The general drive is toward building a community." 

Chancellor Tippo said that he was impressed with the 
sincerity of the people presenting coeducational dormitory proposals 
It would be necessary however, he said, for him to be the "devil's 
advocate" and point out the concern of parents, taxpayers and the 
legislature and the heavy criticism already encountered over the one 
experimental coeducational dormitory, and other liberalization of 
University regulations. 

Trustee Olken expressed the opinion that the University 
administration and the Trustees were "over-reacting" to the public 
concern. 

President Lederle commented on the large numbers of 
letters he has received from parents and legislators, and the genera 
public, many of which express particular disagreement with coeduca- 
tional living arrangements at the University. The President stressed 
the importance, no matter what direction residence living takes in 
the future, of providing a wide variety of accommodations, especially 
for students preferring non-coeducational dormitories. 



I 



I 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Trustee Croce asked what provisions or controls had been 
considered for individuals in coeducational living experiments, 
who might prove to be psychologically undesirable. 

Mr. Tierney said that it would be necessary to adhere to 
pluralistic ideals, with individual dormitories providing many 
learning and living styles. He cited the "Mackimmie tradition - 
quiet, studious." 

President Lederle pointed out the fact that in almost any 
dormitory the majority would vote for liberalization of all rules, 
but that the University had an obligation to provide alternates for 
the minority in each case. 

Chancellor Tippo noted that some dormitories have already 
voted not to have 24-hour open house next year. Others have voted 
not to go coeducational. 

Dr. Bromery said that in visiting dormitories he had come 
to feel that "pigeon hole" dormitories develop an atmosphere that 
defeats the purposes of the educational process. Butterfield and 
Greenough, he said, were clean, quiet, neat, with all attributes fo 
learning - segregated dormitories were "a contrast." 

Mr. Hanson suggested that the atmosphere in dormitories, 
and the prevailing drug and related problems were "a result of the 
present system." "Some dorms are decent," he said, "while many 
male dorms have the most destruction, the most immorality." "The 
situation," he said, "spawns such incidents as group terrorizing of 
girls." Mr. Hanson suggested that a point to be considered in this 
respect might be "how a University could affect a total society." 

Trustee Croce expressed agreement with the philosophy of 
pluralism in that there should be some dormitories like Greenough 
and Butterfield, but he felt that "this would be incongruous as a 
total environment." 

Dean Field expressed agreement with Dr. Croce, and said 
that much patience was required to get a house ready for a coed 
proposal. He noted that only twelve out of fifty-four houses have 
presented coed proposals for the mid-April deadline. There was 
much confusion, he said, resulting from the initial "24-hour open 
house," with resultant sorting-out of students and with some houses 
now desiring more restrictive regulations. "A pluralism of life 
styles is beginning to emerge." the Dean stated. 

Chancellor Tippo requested Dean Field to comment on 
"adjacent rooms" in coeducational dormitories. The Dean said that 
he felt some reluctance over widespread adoption of coeducational 
living principles. He pointed out the difficulties of explaining 
adjacent room proposals to parents, adding that he would hate to 
face the general criticism that would be generated. He agreed, 
however, that people should get to know each other better and that 



3523 



} 



3524 



COMMITTEE 



Lewis 
Proposal 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

the best social relationships occur among people living on the same 
floor of a dormitory. Dean Field also expressed agreement with the 
five-point principle as "making good sense." 

The Lewis Proposal was presented by Miss Fisher and Miss 
Cullinan. Lewis, a small girls' dormitory is proposing alternate 
rooms. Parents have been involved in discussions and have served on 
committees, Miss Fisher said. The majority of parents took the 
initial position of being against the proposal though, she said, 
there was general agreement that the proposal was "intelligent." 
Discussions are continuing, Miss Fisher said, and one result is 
that the parents feel a closer bond because of the discussions. 

Trustee Croce raised a further point regarding the norm 
of behavior exacted by those who elect this style of living. "What, 
he said, "would you do about those who are unsuited for communal 
living?" 

Mr. Tierney admitted that this situation, while it had not 
arisen, would be a factor which would require much discussion. Dr. 
Bromery said that as a practical matter, "a narcotics pusher for in- 
stance, would not remain in a communal environment as he would be 
discovered, if the community is real." 

Chairman Rowland said "What would you do about disruptive 
behavior? How long would you allow this?" Mr. Hanson thought that 
such persons could be removed through the judicial system. Dean 
Field noted that there are now campus-wide rules for such behavior, 
but that "students are reluctant to take action." Dean Field added 
that the houses with real initiative, such as Mackimmie have re- 
quired people to move out. He added that the highest responsibility 
is shown in a "special purpose" house, with residents recruited in 
advance. 

Following a brief luncheon recess, Chairman Rowland re- 
viewed the Trustees recommendations of last fall in regard to se- 
curity and other dormitory problems. The establishment of Greenough 
as an experiment in coeducational living had not become Board policy 
by a unanimous vote, she recalled. "Today," Chairman Rowland said, 
"a basic change is being proposed; the question of alternate rooms 
vs. alternate floors. Personally I feel that this request follows 
fast on the heels of the first vote." Chairman Rowland pointed out 
the strong possibility that the majority of the Board of Trustees 
would not find this proposal acceptable. She suggested a compromise 
of staying with the existing policy and extending the policy to 
other dormitories, as individually approved by the administration. 

Chancellor Tippo made the recommendation that the "five- 
points" of the Greenough guidelines be adopted as University policy 
in considering other coeducational dormitory proposals. 



[ 



I 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Mr. Johnson, for Prince House , described that dormitory's 
proposal as being a "combination graduate and undergraduate, inter- 
national, coeducational program." 

Dean Field noted that it was important to give the 
Chancellor authority to go ahead with other dormitories "on the 
Greenough model," in time for next year's room choosing, which is 
now set for the end of April. The Dean said that his preference 
would be that all new coed dorm proposals would be required to 
operate, at least at first, on a separate floor basis. 

Trustee Olken expressed the opinion that enforcing 
separate floor living arrangements would defeat the social purposes 
of community living. 

Dean Field disagreed, saying that there were other 
mechanisms to bring about social grouping and freedom of social 
contact. 

President Lederle and Chairman Rowland again stressed the 
importance of the public relations factor, and the possible impact 
on the University as a whole if a negative public reaction results 
from the establishment of more coeducational dormitories on the 
campus . 

Dr. Croce reinforced this sentiment, saying that these 
new proposals "would probably come as a shock" to some Trustees who 
looked upon Greenough as an experiment which was to be considered 
and evaluated for a longer period of time than has now elapsed. 
He expressed concern over the high percentage of students who would 
not be psychologically fitted for coed dormitory living, and he 
said that the selectivity of students themselves unfortunately 
could not be depended upon to control the situation. Dr. Croce 
felt that more details of the experiment and observation for a 
longer period were necessary before wider extension of the policy, 
and said that he was not now in favor of any proposals involving 
adjacent rooms. 

Mr. Hanson noted the "very critical situation on the 
campus in regard to widespread use of drugs and alcohol and the 
increasing concern of the police for the security of the campus." 

Dr. Croce asked if there was a possibility that the legis 
lators would connect the fact that "this is the University's worst 
year for infraction of rules with the liberalizations of regula- 
tions." 

President Lederle commended the students presenting pro- 
posals for their sincerity but said that he felt that more time 
must elapse before any major change in the regulations could be 
made. 

On motion made and seconded, it was then 



3525 



Prince 
House 



3526 



COMMITTEE 



Financial 
Policy Act - 
Student 
Government 
Association 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
the Greenough principles ( (1) voluntary 
participation - all residents of a dormitory 
must agree before plans can be approved, 
(2) meetings of parents, students and ad- 
ministrators must be held before plans can 
be approved, (3) written permission for 
those under 21, (4) separate or segregated 
floors, (5) no freshmen ) be applied to all 
coeducational dormitory proposals and that 
the actual implementation of such proposals 
be left in the hands of the UM/ Amherst ad- 
ministration. 

Trustee Croce was recorded in opposi- 
tion, on the grounds that the origina 
intent had been to limit the experi- 
ment to Greenough, not with the idea 
of expansion but for reconsideration 
of the experiment to see if it should 
continue. 

The Financial Policy Act for the Student Government 
Association (Document T70-100) was next discussed. Chairman Rowland 
noted the complexities of the document. Dean Field said that the 
document, while complex, was an improvement on other policies and 
would simplify accounting procedures. The constitutionality of the 
document, in regard to the state statutes, however, should be 
checked by Mr. Myers, he said. The major change is in regulations 
concerning residence hall accounts. 

Dean Field recommended acceptance of the document as opera 
tional procedure for Student Government, if the procedures are 
approved. The Board decision on this matter will affect procedures 
for September 1970, so it is hoped that action will be possible in 
April, or May at the latest. 

Trustee Olken said that "Provost" where used in the docu- 
ment should be changed to "Chancellor." 

After further discussion, it was moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
the Financial Policy Act for the Student 
Government Association UM/ Amherst be approved 
in principle, pending review by legal counsel. 



The meeting was adjou 




G 



t 



k 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON FACULTY AND EDUCATIONAL 

POLICY 



May 1, 1970, 11:00 a.m., Room 168, Parker Hou 

Boston 



se, 



PRESENT : Chairman Troy, President Lederle; 

Trustees Lyons, Maginnis; Secretary 
McCartney 

From UM/A : Chancellor Tippo; Associate 

Provosts Allen and Gluckstern; Dean 

Shapiro; Professors Burroughs, Kinney, 

Rothberg, Short, Taylor, Ulin; Counsel 

Broadhurst, Mrs. Hull, Mrs. Aino Jarvesoo, 

Counsel Silver, Burres 

From UM/B : Chancellor Broderick, Dean 

Gagnon 

From UM/H : Dean Soutter 

Chairman Troy convened the meeting at 11:15 a.m., taking 
up first the petition of Mrs. Aino Jarvesoo. During this portion 
of the meeting there were present: President Lederle, Chancellor 
Tippo, Associate Provosts Allen and Gluckstern, Secretary McCartney 
of the UM/ Amherst administration; and Mrs. Hull, Recording 
Secretary to the Board. Also Professors Burroughs and Ulin of the 
UM/Amherst faculty; Mrs. Jarvesoo, Messrs. Silver and Burres as 
her counsel; Mr. Broadhurst as counsel for the Trustee Committee 
on Faculty and Educational Policy. 

The Chairman stated that there had been previously 
distributed to all Trustees copies of Trustee Document (T70-101) 
which consists of the following items: 

1. Mr. Broadhurst' s memorandum of September 13, 
1965 to Treasurer Kenneth W. Johnson Re : 
Mrs. Aino Jarvesoo 

2. Mr. Silver's memorandum of January 23, 1970 
to the Trustee Committee on Faculty and 
Educational Policy Re: Grievance of Aino 
Jarvesoo , with these appendices: 

(a) Letter from Professor Beth, for the 
Faculty Committee on Tenure, to Presi- 
dent Lederle, June 10, 1965 

(b) Background Information - Concerning the 
Dismissal of Aino Jarvesoo by the Uni - 
versity of Massachusetts (undated) 

and Letter to Dr. Albert Anthony, Chairman, 
Faculty Tenure and Grievance Committee from 
Mrs. Jarvesoo (undated) 



35S 



Grievance 
Petition - 
Mrs. Aino 
Jarvesoo 



3528 



COMMITTEE 



High Level 
Faculty 
Appointment - 
UM/Worcester 



Proposal De- 
partment of 
Hispanic 
Languages & 
Literatures 
UM/ Amherst 



Department 
of French, 
Italian and 
Classics 

UM/ Amherst 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Mr. Silver made an opening statement and introduced Pro- 
fessor Joseph Burroughs, Chairman of the Tenure and Grievance 
Committee of the Faculty Senate, who reviewed the action taken by, 
and the position of, the Committee respecting Mrs. Jarvesoo's 
situation. Copies of various written communications between Mrs. 
Jarvesoo and persons representing her on the one hand and officers 
and officials of the University on the other hand were then presented 
to the meeting. Mrs. Jarvesoo and President Lederle made statements 
and Mrs. Jarvesoo and Mr. Silver responded to questions by members 
of the Committee and by Mr. Broadhurst. Mr. Silver made a con- 
cluding statement and the Chairman invited Mr. Silver and Mr. 
Broadhurst to submit memoranda as to the legal effect of the facts 
as clarified by the materials presented at the meeting. 

The committee, after a brief recess for lunch, took up the 
academic matters on the agenda. 

Dean Soutter discussed with the committee a high level 
faculty appointment proposed for UM/Worcester. The salary proposed, 
although above the general salary schedule, is realistic, Dean 
Soutter said. It is, in fact, below any comparable salary which a 
physician would receive outside of the Medical School. 

After discussion, it was moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
a high level faculty appointment for 
UM/Worcester be approved. 

A proposal to establish a Department of Hispanic Languages 
was discussed by Professor Rothberg, Acting Chairman of the Hispanic 
Section within the Department of Romance Languages. This proposal, 
as detailed in Document T70-102 is fully endorsed by Dean Shapiro 
and Professor Taylor, Head of the Department of Romance Languages. 
Professor Taylor noted that if a Hispanist of national stature is 
found to serve as head, the department is bound to profit by 
widened contacts. A Four-College doctorate in Spanish is to be 
offered. 



After discussion, 



and on motion made and seconded, it was 



VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
the proposal to establish a Department of 
Hispanic Languages and Literatures within 
the College of Arts and Sciences, UM/ Amherst, 
be approved. (Document T70-102) 

Professor Taylor recommended that the Department of Romanc 
Languages UM/ Amherst be renamed the Department of French, Italian 
and Classics. After discussion, it was moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
the proposal to rename the Department of 
Romance Languages as the Department of French, 
Italian and Classics, UM/ Amherst be approved. 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

The proposal to establish a Bachelor's Degree with In- 
dividual Concentration was presented by Associate Provost Allen. 
(Document T70-103) Provost Allen traced the history of this pro- 
posal from its inception in the School of Education to its subse- 
quent study by sub-committees of the Faculty Senate Academic 
Matters Committee. In its present form the proposal is 
essentially a two-year pilot program to be limited to 60 students. 
An individual concentration of work will take the place of 
standard requirements. It was pointed out that this program is 
"not another type of honors program" and that normal graduation 
requirements must be met. 

After general discussion, it was moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees 
that the proposal to establish a 
Bachelor's Degree with Individual Con- 
centration, UM/ Amherst, be approved. 
(Document T70-103) 

Tenure recommendations UM/Boston were discussed by 
Chancellor Broderick and Dean Gagnon. It was noted that all 
recommendations were from within the departments and that all had 
been reviewed in detail. 

After discussion, it was moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees 

that the Tenure Recommendations, UM/Boston, 
as of April 23, 1970 be approved. 
(Document T70-104) 

Associate Provost Gluckstern reviewed the tenure 
recommendations UM/ Amherst. He noted minor changes in the list. 
The list was approved as revised. 



After discussion, it was moved. 



seconded and 



VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees 

that the Tenure Recommendations, UM/ Amherst, 
revised as of April 27, 1970, be approved. 
(Document T70-105) 

Action was deferred on the UM/Boston Year of Study in 
France Budget as there had not been an opportunity to study the 
budget increase memorandum. 

The proposal to discontinue the divisional system at 
UM/Boston was discussed. The Faculty Senate has voted to request 
the Board to allow the present system of four divisions to expire 
on August, 1970. It was pointed out that this is the logical 
point at which to phase out the present divisions, looking to the 
future College system at Columbia Point. 



3529 



Proposal 
Bachelor' s 
Degree with 
Individual 
Concentration 
UM/Amherst 



Tenure 

Recommendations 

UM/Boston 



Tenure 

Recommendations 

UM/Amherst 



Discontinuance 
Divisional 
System 
UM/Boston 



3530 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

After discussion, and on motion made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees 
that the Divisional System, UM/Boston, 
be discontinued as of August, 1970. 

• The meeting was adjourned at 3:20 p.m. 




I 



COMMITTEE 



I 



1 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON FINANCE 



May 13, 1970, 11:00 

PRESENT: 



a.m. 



Hancock Room, Statler Hilton Hotel, Boston 



Chairman Pumphret, President Lederle; 
Trustees Gordon, Frechette, Knowles , 
Rowland; Treasurer Johnson, Secretary 
McCartney 

Trustee Shaler 

From UM/A : Chancellor Tippo, Deans 

Field and Gugin; Professors Dale and 

Ludtke; Messrs. Averill, Maus, Myers; 

Mrs. Hull 

From UM/B : Chancellor Broderick, 

Vice-chancellor Hamilton, Mr. Cass 

From UM/W : Dean Soutter, Mr. Stockwell 

From Standish, Ayer & Wood, Inc. : 

Mr. Ladd, Mr. Wood 



The meeting was convened by Chairman Pumphret at 11:10 a 
The first agenda item - Report of Investment Counsel - was made by 
Mr. Wood and Mr. Ladd. The current economic situation was fully 
reviewed and the firm's recommendations on investments related to 
the operating and endowment funds were gone over in detail. 
(Document T70-108) 

After thorough discussion, it was moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To authorize the Treasurer of the Univer- 
sity, Kenneth W. Johnson, to execute the 
changes in orders in the University's in- 
vestment portfolio as recommended by 
Standish, Ayer and Wood, Inc. 



Sell 
677 


Issue 
Scott Paper 




Approx 
Price 
30 


Market 

Value 

$20,310 


Buy 
250 


General Signal 
convertible pre 


92 
ferred 


$23,000 


It was a 


lso 








VOTED: To ai 


ithorize the Treasurer 


of the 


Uni- 



versity, Kenneth W. Johnson, to buy a 
certificate of deposit in the amount of 
$100,000 at 7%% for one year from the 
Union National Bank of Lowell. 

It was agreed that the investment program in commercial 
paper and government bonds for the operating fund would be con- 
tinued with the advice of Investment Counsel each time funds were 
available for short-term investment. 



3531 



Report of 

Investment 

Counsel 



3532 



COMMITTEE 



Hodgkins 

Cove 

Property 



Brian 

Rattigan 

Fund 

UM/ Bos ton 



Murray D. 

Lincoln 

Estate 



Liability 
Insurance 
for Employees 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Treasurer Johnson next discussed the various savings 
banks in the Fall River and New Bedford area which have been under 
consideration for deposit of University funds. It was agreed that 
the Treasurer would open savings accounts in the Fall River Five 
Cent Savings Bank and the New Bedford Institution for Savings. 

The Treasurer also reported on the Hodgkins Cove property 
A buy and sell agreement has been entered into, and the University 
of Massachusetts Foundation has worked out details of financing con 
forming to the previous understanding of the committee. It was notei 
that the agreements do not restrict use of this property to 
UM/ Amherst. 

Agenda item two - Endowment Fund, UM/Boston - was 
discussed. This fund is to be established in the name of the late 
Brian Rattigan, a poet and member of the class of 1969, by friends 
and classmates. Contributions to the fund shall be held in trust 
to provide scholarship funds in recognition of creative achievement. 

Upon motion made and seconded, it was therefore 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees 
establishment of an endowment fund, 
UM/Boston, in the name of Brian Rattigan 
in accordance with the terms of the gift 
presented to the meeting. 

Status of settlement of the Murray D. Lincoln Estate - the 
third agenda item, was reviewed by the Treasurer. Settlement is 
probably about a year away. The trustees of the estate and the 
Treasurer's Office are cooperating on many details of the arrange- 
ments. It was agreed that Investment Counsel, Standish, Ayer & Wood 
Inc. would be asked to review the securities in the estate to de- 
termine if they should be retained for the Endowment Fund portfolio. 
The Treasurer reported that the bequest is unrestricted and, by its 
terms, may be used for student loans should the Trustees wish to do 
so. 

Agenda item four - Liability Insurance for Employees - was 
reviewed by Professor Verda Dale, Chairman of a special Faculty 
Senate Committee studying this matter, and by Mr. Sidney Myers, 
staff attorney, UM/ Amherst. Professor Dale presented the committee's 
recommendation that the University explore the possibility of pro- 
viding liability insurance coverage and that it be extended to 
members of the non-professional staff. The coverage now provided by 
the Commonwealth is "rather minimal," she said. 

Mr. Myers has also been studying various aspects of pro- 
viding liability insurance coverage to employees. He reported that 
most institutions are now providing this insurance; that "charitable 
immunity" is on the way out. 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

It was agreed that a feasibility study of liability in- 
surance would be made that would include malpractice 
coverage for members of the Medical School staff and also coverage 
for administrative liability. All possibilities for contributory 
and non-contributory plans will be investigated and the matter will 
be brought at the appropriate time to the state legislature if 
state funds are required to pay the insurance premiums. It was the 
consensus of the committee that trust funds could not be used for 
this purpose. A group contributory plan would be desirable. 

Present disability insurance coverage for professional 
employees was discussed by the Treasurer. This plan may now be 
made available to non-professional employees with the condition 
that they must have a physical examination. This has been 
recommended by the Faculty Senate at Amherst. The Treasurer 
recommended extending this contract to cover non-professional staff 
throughout the University system. 

On motion made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
the disability insurance coverage plan con- 
tract presently in force for professional 
employees at all campuses be extended to 
cover non-professional staff on all campuses 
of the University system at the same premium 
currently being paid by the professional 
staff, UM/ Amherst. 

Treasurer Johnson next presented the Quarterly Report of 
the Treasurer , and Transfers as outlined in the report. 

Two additional transfers were requested by Vice-Chancello r 
Hamilton in addition to those detailed in the Treasurer's report. 

Mr. Stockwell presented requests for transfers for the 
Medical School noting that these transfers were largely 
necessitated by equipment purchases for faculty just now being 
employed and for consulting fees. 

After discussion, it was moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To approve the following transfers between 

subsidiary accounts, UM/ Amherst and UM/Boston 
as detailed on pages 2 and 3 of the Quarterly 
Report of the Treasurer (Document T70-109) . 



3533 



Disability 
Insurance 
Coverage 
System 



Quarterly 
Report of 
the Treasurer 



Transfers 



3534 



COMMITTEE 



Student 
Health 

Fee 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

UM/ Amherst 

From: Account 1350-01-01 Salaries, Permanent" 
1350-01-04 Food for Persons** 
1350-01-06 Housekeeping Supplies** 
1350-01-08 Heat and Other Plant Opera- 
tions 

To: Account 1350-01-02 Salaries, Other* 

1350-01-03 Services, Non-Employees* 
1350-01-10 Travel and Automotive Ex- 
penses 
1350-01-14 Office and Administrative 
Expenses** 



$199,000.00 

1,450.00 

3,500.00 

80,000.00 



75,000.00 

124,000.00 

4,950.00 

80,000.00 



* This transfer is to provide funds to balance the salary account 
and provide additional funds for overtime, recruitment, summer 
session and student labor. 

-<•* This transfer is to provide funds for automotive expenses, travel 
funds, postage and telephone. 



UM/Boston 



5,000.00 



From: Account 1350-02-08 Heat and Other Plant Opera- 
tions 

1350-02-12 Repair, Alterations and Addi- 14,000.00 
tions 

1350-02-13 Special Supplies 

1350-02-16 Rentals 

1350-81-03 Services, Non-Employees* 



30,000.00 
8,500.00 
3,300.00 



To: Account 1350-02-03 Services, Non-Employees 30,000.00 

1350-02-10 Travel and Automotive Ex- 3,000.00 

1350-02-11 Advertising and Printing 10,500.00 

1350-02-14 Office and Administrative 14,000.00 

Expenses 

1350-81-10 Travel and Automotive Expenses 300.00 

1350-81-13 Special Supplies and Expenses 3,000.00 

This transfer is to provide funds for summer session, student 
labor and increased recruiting of faculty. Also to publish a 
second catalogue and for additional telephone expenses. 

* The transfer in the Disadvantaged student account is to provide 
for special supplies and travel. 

Agenda item seven - Student Health Fee - UM/ Amherst was 
discussed by Mr. Averill of the Infirmary staff. 

An increase in the Student Health Fee of $5.00 per 
semester has been considered and approved by the appropriate bodies 
on campus, including the Student Senate. The increase is necessi- 
tated to finance the increased costs resulting from the state 



I 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

employees' pay raises approved by the State Legislature in July 
1969, including the anticipated annual cost of living adjustment. 
Motion was thereupon made, seconded, and it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
the student health fee be increased to 
$35.00 per semester effective the first 
semester of the 1970-71 academic year. 

Public bids for the Voluntary Group Supplementary Health 
Insurance Program were solicited during the month of March with 
seven bid proposals received. The low six bidders complied with 
the specifications as written. The Home Insurance Company was the 
low bidder at $27.00 per calendar year for single students. Motior 
was thereupon made, seconded, and it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees to 

award the contract for the Voluntary Group 
Supplementary Health Insurance Program to 
Home Insurance Company, New York, New York 
(Agent: Higham, Neilson, Whitridge & Reid, 
Inc., 131 State Street, Boston, Massachusetts) 
in accordance with specifications on file in 
the Office of the Treasurer. 

Treasurer Johnson presented agenda item eight - 
Delegation of Expenditures to Director of Certain Programs . 

The First National Bank of Boston, depository of our 
funds for the Year of Study in France Program, has advised us that 
although Directors of the Program have withdrawn funds from this 
account in the past, our present Trustee vote only authorizes 
designated officers of the University to sign documents relating 
to the expenditure of funds. No officer has the authorization to 
delegate this function. 

Efficient administration of this Program requires that 
the Director be allowed to request funds from France as he deems 
necessary within budgetary restrictions. This may also be appli- 
cable to other Foreign Programs. 

After discussion, it was moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
the Treasurer, Kenneth W. Johnson, be, and 
he hereby is authorized to designate signa- 
tures for Special Program checking accounts 
both here and abroad. 



The meeting was adjourned^U: 12: 50 p.m 




Secre 




t J. McCartr 
Board of Tri/si 



es 



3535 



Voluntary 
Group 

Supplementary 
Health In- 
surance 
Program 



Delegation of 
Expenditures 
to Directors 
of Special 
Programs 



3536 



COMMITTEE 



Graduate 

Program 

Development 

Preliminary 

Report 



Afro-American 

Studies 

Concentration 

UM/Boston 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON FACULTY AND EDUCATIONAL 

POLICY 



May 18, 1970, 10:30 a.m. 



Room 170, Parker House, Boston 



PRESENT : Chairman Troy, President Lederle; 
Trustees Boyden, Lyons, Maginnis ; 
Secretary McCartney, Mrs. Hull 

For the 10:30 a.m. session : 
From UM/B : Chancellor Broderick, Dean 
Gagnon; Professors Antonoff, Becker, 
Broderick, Gittleman, Kaplan, Risse, 
Roberts, Sarotte, Volpe; Miss Lima, 
Mr. White 

For the 1:30 p.m. session : 

From UM/A : Chancellor Tippo, Associate 

Provost Allen; Professors Barber, Jones; 

Mr. Elters, Miss Levinson; Colonels 

Connolly and Friedman; ROTC and AFROTC 

cadets 

Chairman Troy convened the morning session at 10:45 a.m. 
and proceeded directly to the first agenda item - Graduate Program 
Development - a Preliminary Report . 

Reviewing the proposal were Professors Antonoff, Physics; 
Becker, Chemistry; Kaplan, Biology; and Tanimoto, Mathematics, 
UM/Boston, who detailed the programs for their respective department 
and responded to questions. The plans for graduate work call for 
modest beginnings in all departments involved at the present UM/Boston 
location in 1971. Major development will come after the opening of 
the Columbia Point campus. 

The strong commitment of the faculty to a graduate pro- 
gram was emphasized, as well as the relationship of graduate re- 
search programs to quality education in general and to recruitment 
and retaining of a high caliber faculty. Difficulties of funding 
were discussed. It was noted by President Lederle that routing the 
proposals through the UM/ Amherst Graduate Council would expedite the 
matter of clearance with the Board of Higher Education. 

This program is to be presented for final approval at a 
later date. 

The Afro-American Studies Concentration - UM/Boston was 
discussed by Professor Sarotte of the French Department and Pro- 
fessor Gittleman, Co-Chairman of the Afro-American Society, and by 
Marilyn Lima, UM/B Class of '69 and Robert White, a graduate of 
UM/B now attending the Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy. 



i 



I 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Professor Sarotte noted that the UM/A and UM/B Afro- 
American programs differed substantially in that the UM/B program 
is substantially one of enrichment of courses within a specific 
major with material relevant to the black experience. Professor 
Gittleman emphasized the feeling of the Afro-American Committee 
that "training in a specific discipline is absolutely essential." 
Miss Lima spoke of the problem of recruitment of qualified students 
in the Boston area, and she and Mr. White emphasized the "utter 
necessity" of adequate counseling and advisory services. Miss 
Lima stressed the importance of the director of the program being 
strongly committed to graduation of participating students. 

Members of the Trustee committee enthusiastically 
approved the efforts to integrate, rather than separate, non- 
western course material and Afro-American Studies within the 
regular University program. 



After further discussion, motion was made and seconded; 



and it was 



VOTED: 



To recommend to the Board of Trustees 
that an Afro-American Studies Concentra- 
tion, UM/Boston, as detailed in Document 
T70-112 be established. 



Discussion of the Junior Year in Paris Budget was de- 
ferred until a later date. 

The Film Studies Center - UM/Boston was next discussed. 
Chancellor Broderick noted that Professor Robert Risse was primarily 
responsible for the proposal to establish a University Film Center 
as a cooperative project with ten other colleges and universities. 
The film library is now located at Brandeis . Participation in 
this program is expected to enrich greatly the Theatre Arts Program 

This project was reviewed for the Trustees for informa- 
tional purposes only. No action by the Board is necessary at this 
time. 

A Major in Italian Language and Literature - UM/Boston 
was discussed by Professor Gerald Volpe, who will be acting head 
of the program at its inception in 1970. The Department will have 
three full-time faculty members and others on a part-time basis. 

After further discussion, it was moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees 
that a Major in Italian Language and 
Literature, UM/Boston, as detailed in 
Document T70-114 be established. 

Discussion on a Music Major was deferred until June. 



■53?' 



Film 
Studies 
Center - 
UM/Boston 



Major in 
Italian 
Language & 
Literature 
UM/Boston 



3538 



Theatre Arts 
Sub-department 
UM/ Bos ton 



COMMITTEE 



English 

Course 

Revisions 

UM/Boston 



ROTC - 
UM/ Amherst 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

The proposal to establish a Theatre Arts sub-department - 
UM/Boston was discussed by Professor Louis Roberts. It is proposed 
that initially, this will be a service department with no major, to 
begin operation in 1970-71. Professor Roberts responded to question^ 
from the committee regarding the courses as outlined. It is hoped 
that a Fine Arts Major will be developed eventually for art, music, 
film and drama. ' 

After discussion, and on motion made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
a Theatre Arts sub-department, UM/Boston, 
as detailed in Document T70-115 be established. 

English Course Revisions - UM/Boston were discussed by 
Professor James Broderick, Chairman of the Department. Professor 
Broderick noted that revisions in introductory English courses were 
necessary principally because of poor preparation of entering stu- 
dents. Courses have been restructured in part to provide emphasis 
"simply on the essentials of writing and thinking." Course material 
has been added which is considered to be both relevant and compelling; 
and which will, hopefully, elicit response. It was noted that final 
reading lists will contain more traditional material than is now 
outlined in the tentative lists. 

Trustee Lyons suggested consideration of a possible 
correlation between English writing assignments and the study of 
other subjects, as a way to arouse interest in the subject matter 
of English papers. 

After further discussion, it was moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
English Course Revisions - UM/Boston as de- 
tailed in Document T70-116 be approved. 

The committee then recessed for lunch. The afternoon 
session was called to order at 1:45 p.m. with the matter of ROTC on 
the Amherst campus as the sole agenda item. 



Chancellor Tippo reviewed action taken at the committee's 
meeting of April 13, 1970 when he had brought in the recommendation 
of the Faculty Senate that the military services be given notice of 
intent to renegotiate ROTC and AFROTC contracts, and that related 
budgetary matters be reconsidered. This action was subsequently 
approved by the full Board of Trustees on April 22, 1970. At that 
time the Chancellor indicated that the Trustees would be asked to 
consider the substantive recommendations for renegotiation of the 
contracts. These recommendations are contained in motions passed by 
the Faculty Senate on November 20, 1969, (Senate Document 70-005A) 
and motions passed on January 29, 1970, (attached). These 
recommendations were proposed as the basis of negotiations of the 
new contracts. As the Faculty Senate had also passed on May 14, 197C 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

additional motions urging early action on ROTC, Chancellor Tippo 
had requested that this matter be added to the committee agenda so 
that the Board of Trustees could take action on May 29. 

Professor Phillips Jones summarized the reports of the 
Military Affairs Subcommittee of the Faculty Senate. 

Colonel Friedman said that the military departments on 
campus had been asked for their reaction to the proposals, but that 
he could not officially comment. The official response to any 
terms of renegotiation, he said, would have to come from the De- 
partments of the Army and the Air Force after they had had an 
opportunity to review the proposals. Colonel Friedman noted that 
the department of military science had cooperated on working out 
details of course content and wished to continue to do so. He also 
pointed out that the present ROTC program had been designed to be 
"academically acceptable" by a group of eminent educators in 1963. 

Referring to the Faculty Senate proposals, Colonel 
Friedman noted that similar pilot programs at other schools had 
not worked out well. He said that the experience of having courses 
relevant to the ROTC program taught by regular faculty members 
rather than by military science professors had been unfavorable. 
He also pointed out that, under the Faculty Senate proposals, it 
would be necessary for a cadet to do the equivalent of six credits 
of course work for which he would not be given credit. 

Trustee Lyons asked Colonel Friedman if, indeed, the 
Faculty Senate proposals actually meant that courses given by pro- 
fessors in the military science department could not be given credi 
that, to receive credit, all courses related to the ROTC program 
must be taught by regular University faculty; and that students 
would actually be required to take six credits of work for which 
they would receive no credit. Colonel Friedman replied that this 
was the case. 

Colonel Connolly noted that the ROTC program as it now 
exists meets both military and University requirements, providing 
both a liberal education and technical "know-how," and that this 
concept did not run counter to University policies as applied to 
other departments. He detailed qualifications of the ROTC faculty, 
noting that three out of five senior faculty members had advanced 
degrees, and that this was consistent with University criteria. 

Colonel Connolly noted serious disadvantages in a two- 
year program, if the present four-year program is abolished as 
called for in the Faculty Senate proposals. The two-year program, 
he said, was designed for transfer students, primarily those from 
community colleges; it would cancel out many ROTC scholarships; 
work would have to be made up in two separate summer camp periods 
instead of one with a resulting loss of summer income for cadets. 



3539 



3540 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Regarding the breakdown of costs related to the program, 
as outlined in the Faculty Senate Military Affairs Subcommittee of 
January 29, 1970, Colonel Connolly noted that the depreciation costs 
charged to the building seemed to run counter to University policy 
as similar costs are not charged against other University buildings. 
He cited related service programs to the University by the military: 
a nursing program affiliated with Walter Reed Hospital, a WAC pro- 
gram, and band instruments on permanent loan to the University, 
among others. He noted the fact that several cadets trained at the 
UM/ Amherst unit are now serving on the faculty at West Point. The 
ROTC cadets, Colonel Connolly said, are dedicated, motivated stu- 
dents. 

A cadet, George James, spoke briefly on the cadets "right 
to academic freedom," saying that the University creates many courses 
in specific areas of interest and demand, and that a student should 
have the "right to learn about the military" if that is his choice. 
He introduced the cadet's spokesman, Alan Rosen. 

Mr. Rosen identified himself as a graduate student in the 
School of Business, a graduate of McGill University, and a cadet. 
He said that there was no real justification for an attack on ROTC, 
and that, in fact, many students had admitted that ROTC was merely a 
"symbol of their frustrations." Mr. Rosen defined the goals of the 
cadets in the present situation as "being granted the same rights as 
other students," and to present a rebuttal to the Faculty Senate 
proposals. 

Mr. Rosen stated that in a recent campus referendum taken 
on several issues including the question of ROTC, the vote had been 
4211 in favor of retaining the program, and 2228 against. A petitior 
supporting ROTC, Mr. Rosen said, had received 3000 signatures in 
little over 24 hours, at a time when many students were away from 
campus. He noted many "special interest" courses in the University 
catalogue, among them a three credit course in "camping," and credit 
courses with no texts or requirements. "Cadets find it hard to be- 
lieve," he said, "that courses taught by the highly qualified ROTC 
faculty would not be given academic credit." 

President Lederle noted that it had been proposed by the 
Student Senate at one time to give course credit for membership on 
that body. 

Miss Levinson spoke for the Strike Anti-ROTC Committee on 
"University complicity in the war effort." She also said that the 
strike committee did not consider the referendum valid, alleging 
that "it is illegitimate, just as ROTC is also illegitimate." 

Trustee Elters, President of the Student Senate, said that 
the Student Senate supported the Silver motion of November 20, 1969, 
presented to but not passed by the Faculty Senate on that date. 
"The Student Senate, the Faculty Senate, and the Administration are 
combined in their stand against ROTC," Mr. Elters stated. 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Chancellor Tippo said that the Administration and Faculty 
Senate should not be included in Mr. Elters ' statement. 

Associate Provost Allen noted that the members of ROTC 
present and speaking outnumbered the persons who had spoken in 
support of the anti-ROTC position, and asked that Professor Barber 
be allowed to speak. 

Professor Barber, Chairman of the Strike Subcommittee on 
Non-Violence, referring to the Benson Report mentioned in the 
Faculty Senate Subcommittee Report, said that he was most deeply 
troubled as far as ROTC was concerned by "allowing a group outside 
of the University to control a department within the University." 

Colonel Connolly requested time to state the ROTC posi- 
tion in regard to any studies of academic course content that the 
University wished to make. "The department has been, and will con- 
tinue to be open at any time for any study group. The department 
would welcome, he said, a University-wide study of its program and 
would be flexible in meeting academic concerns of the University 
community." Colonel Friedman added that ROTC had been "an integral 
part of the University for 83 years, and that it had never before 
been suggested that the military presence had been detrimental to 
the University." 

The ROTC group then left the meeting. 

After extensive discussion, it was moved, seconded 



and 



VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
they approve the Faculty Senate Proposals 
dated November 20, 1969 and January 29, 1970 
as the basis for renegotiation of ROTC and 
AFROTC contracts, i.e., (1) academic courses 
in the ROTC program be taught by regular 
faculty from academic departments for academic 
credit, (2) courses of a more military nature 
be taught by military officers for no academic 
credit, (3) the ROTC program be limited to two 
years, and (4) the title of Lecturer be used 
for officer personnel other than the senior 
officer who would be granted the title of 
professor. 

The meeting adjourned at 3:30 p.m. 





Jert J. McCartney 
Secretary, Board of Tf/is'= : 



3541 



3542 



COMMITTEE 



Savin Hill 
Yacht Club 

Agreement - 
UM/Boston 



Boston 

College High 
School Land - 
UM/Boston 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF COMMITTEE ON BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS 



May 20, 1970, 10:30 a.m., Parlor D, Statler Hilton Hotel, Boston 

PRESENT : Chairman Haigis, President Lederle; 

Trustees Crowley, Maginnis, Pumphret; 
Treasurer Johnson, Secretary McCartney 

From UM/A : Chancellor Tippo, Dean Field, 

Dr. Bromery, Mrs. Hull 

From UM/B : Chancellor Broderick, Vice- 

Chancellor Hamilton, Planning Officer 

O'Brien 

From UM/W : Dean Soutter 

From Charles T. Main, Inc .: Messrs. 

Carpenter and Mooney 

Mr. Kearney, representing Trustee Sullivan 

Chairman Haigis convened the meeting at 10:45 a.m. and 
took up the first agenda item - Savin Hill Yacht Club Agreement , 
UM/Boston. 



Vice-Chancellor Hamilton discussed this matter, noting 
legislation which amends Chapter 898 and excludes property owned by 
the Savin Hill Yacht Club from land-taking by eminent domain by the 
Board of Trustees of the University. These arrangements have been 
made by mutual agreement between UM/Boston and the Savin Hill Yacht 
Club and impose restrictions on the property designed to enhance 
and protect the future Columbia Point campus. 



After discussion, and on motion made and seconded, 



it was 



VOTED: To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
Vice-Chancellor William R. Hamilton, UM/ 
Boston, be authorized to accept on behalf 
of the University of Massachusetts the Grant 
of Restrictions offered by the Savin Hill 
Yacht Club. 

The matter of Boston College High School Land (authority 
to negotiate) , UM/Boston - was also discussed by Vice-Chancellor 
Hamilton, who has been negotiating with Boston College High School 
on this property. Dr. Hamilton requests authority to proceed with 
negotiations on the basis of appraisals which have now been made. 

After discussion, it was moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
Vice-Chancellor William R. Hamilton, UM/ 
Boston, be authorized to proceed with 
negotiations for a certain parcel of land 
now owned by Boston College High School on 
the basis of appraisals which have now been 
made. 



I 



COMMITTEE 






I 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Site Plan,, Charles T. Main, UM/ Bos ton was discussed by 
UM/B Planning Officer O'Brien. The engineering firm has submitted 
a site engineering report for Columbia Point in two parts: (1) Con- 
ceptual Phase 1A - Preliminary Report. These reports were discussed 
in detail. Report (1) was considered acceptable to the committee. 
Report (2) , the Addendum, was not considered acceptable and was re- 
jected by the committee without prejudice. 



The Addendum to 
site problems on a legal, 
responsibility for site p 
have been known since the 
settlement, decomposition 
to be more consequential 
foundations has proved to 
latest tests showing that 
for buildings at a saving 
mates of $20,000,000 for 



3543 



the main body of the report approaches 
rather than on a specific basis, rejecting 

roblems at Columbia Point, most of which 
project's inception. These problems of 

, rodents, and water supply have not proved 

than expected. In fact, the problem of 
be more favorable than anticipated, with 
it will be possible to use friction piles 
of some $1,000,000 over the original esti- 

total site preparation. 



In connection with problems related to the site, corre- 
spondence from Commissioner of Administration Dwight was discussed, 
and appropriate action taken. 

Representatives of Charles T. Main, Inc., Mr. David 
Carpenter and Mr. Arthur Mooney, were invited into the meeting. 
Engineering drawings were presented to preliminary site plans, dike 
construction details, and changes in vehicular traffic plans. The 
issue of mass transit from Columbia station to the Columbia Point 
campus was discussed, and it was noted that the matter is still at 
an impasse in the Legislature. Two requests for planning funds 
have been declined. 

The problem of liability of the firm re site problems was 
also discussed. Mr. Carptenter agreed to re-submit the Addendum to 
the Report, revised to add specific recommendations for solution 
to the site problems which are identified in the report. 

After further discussion, it was moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 

the Conceptual Phase 1A - Preliminary Report 
as submitted by the engineering firm of 
Charles T. Main be approved subject to 
budgetary restrictions of $19,000,000. 

During the luncheon recess Dean Soutfcer reported briefly 
on Medical School progress. Site work is proceeding well. It 
appears that a solution will be found to the problem of approval of 
the design of the library light shaft. The question of the interior 
decoration of the building under construction was discussed, with 
agreement that the decorating contracts would not be given to the 
architects . 



Site Plan 
Charles T. 
UM/Boston 



Main 



Medical School - 
Progress Report 



3544 



COMMITTEE 

Campus 

Residence Hall 
Use by Outside 
Group - 
UM/ Amherst 



Use of Land 
for Columbia 
Point Food 
Services - 
UM/ Bos ton 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Following lunch, Mr. Kearney, representing Commissioner 
Sullivan, was present for discussion of Campus Residence Hall Use 
by Outside Groups - UM/ Amherst . 



Chancellor Tippo reviewed the University's present practice 
of use of student rooms during intersession by individuals attending 
conferences on campus. At the time of the Educator's Conference 
in the spring, students concerned about the then projected, un- 
avoidable rent increases, rebelled against this use of dormitory 
rooms. Some residence halls were willing to cooperate in housing 
conferees, but the loss of personal belongings amounting to $700 
has been since reported, not due to conferees Chancellor Tippo said, 
but rather to security problems in the unlocked residence halls. 

It has been proposed, the Chancellor said, to discontinue 
assignment of student rooms for conference use except on a limited 
basis where residence halls volunteer to cooperate. Such residence 
halls would receive a share of the revenue from room rental fees for 
their respective cultural enrichment funds. 

Mr. Kearney said that he was presenting the views of Com- 
missioner Sullivan and that of the school administrators in the 
Commonwealth. He expressed understanding and sympathy with the 
University's situation, but pointed out that the Educator's Con- 
ference is possibly the largest gathering of public school adminis- 
trators held in the nation; also, that it generates considerable 
revenue for the University and the surrounding area. If the con- 
ference cannot be held at the University, Mr. Kearney said, it would 
"raise doubts among the members of the various institutions repre- 
sented as to whether or not the University is, in fact, a public 
university. " 

Chancellor Tippo suggested that the conference be held in 
the summer. Mr. Kearney responded that this would be impossible. 
Dean Field suggested that increasing the radius for accommodations 
to 15 miles would yield additional hotel and motel facilities, 
assuring ample accommodations for conferees. Mr. Kearney said that 
alternative solutions would be studied. He added that it would be 
unfortunate to destroy the relationship with the University that 
had been developed. He added for the record that during the spring 
conference, the attitude of some students in the residence halls 
toward the conferees had been unfriendly, while others had been very 
cordial. 

Chancellor Broderick presented, for informational purposes 
only, a letter re The Use of Land for Columbia Point Food Services 
Project, UM/Boston . The opinion of legal counsel on this matter will 



be presented at a later date. 

The meeting was adjourned at 




' Robert" J. McCartney 
Secretalgy, Board of Trustees 



I 



I 



I 



COMMITTEE 



I 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

May 20, 1970, 3:00 p.m., Parlor D, Statler Hilton Hotel, Boston 

PRESENT : Chairman Healey, President Lederle; 
Trustees Boyden, Gordon, Haigis, 
Pumphret, Rowland, Troy; Treasurer 
Johnson, Secretary McCartney. 

From UM/A : Chancellor Tippo, Dr. 
Bromery, Dean Field, Mrs. Hull; Miss 
Pugh, for the Student Union Governing 
Board; Messrs. Grinnan, Hogan, Myers 
for the Campus Center. 
From UM/B : Chancellor Broderick, 
Vice-Chancellor Hamilton, Planning 
Officer O'Brien; Mr. Ronald Rabin 
for McKee, Mansueto, Berger, Inc. 
From UM/W : Dean Soutter 
For the University Building Authority : 
Counsel Morris Goldings 

Chairman Healey convened the meeting at 3:05 p.m. taking 
up first the matter of Staff Attorney - UM/Worcester . Dean Soutter 
discussed the necessity for having available the services of a 
local attorney on matters concerning the Medical School. He cited 
agreements with the local hospitals and with the Worcester Medical 
Library, for instance, which will require the continuing attention 
of legal counsel within the City of Worcester. 

After further discussion, and on motion made and 
seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
Dean Soutter be authorized to arrange for 
the services of local legal counsel to serve 
as Staff Attorney - University of Massachusetts 
Medical School. 

Vice-Chancellor Hamilton noted that he would shortly need 
the services of counsel to sit at collective bargaining negotiating 
sessions . 

It was, therfore, moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
Vice -ChancEl lor William R. Hamilton be 
authorized to arrange for the service of 
local legal counsel to serve as Staff 
Attorney - University of Massachusetts/ 
Boston. 



3545 



Staff 

Attorney 

UM/Worcester 



Staff 
Attorney 
UM/ Boston 



3546 



Campus 
Center 
UM/ Amherst 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Campus Center - UM/Amherst was next discussed. The 
Management and Services Contract, which had been prepared by 
Attorney Broadhurst, was reviewed by Attorney Goldings (Document 
T70-120). Basically, Mr. Goldings stated, this contract is con- 
sistent with present University procedures in operation of residence 
halls and food services. There are no essential differences, he 
said, as both operations involve renting of rooms, leasing of 
accommodations, and serving food. Mr. Goldings also noted legal 
similarities between the Campus Center and Alumni Stadium, UM/Amherst: 

Details of the operation of the Campus Center were dis- 
cussed in detail, as outlined in the Campus Center Trust Funds 
Operating Budget, prepared by the Office of the Treasurer (Document 
T70-119) . Minor amendments and adjustments were noted in some fee 
and rate schedules. 

Miss Betty Pugh, Chairman of the Student Union Governing 
Board, noted that a change had been made in proposing fee structures 
on a differentiated schedule (p.l, Section B) . The rationale for 
distinguishing between the fees charged to graduate and undergraduate 
students, Miss Pugh said, was based on the fact that graduate stu- 
dents would not use all Campus Center facilities. 

Dean Field said that "it is widely known on campus" that 
there would be some increase in student fees in succeeding years. 
Miss Pugh noted that the fees as approved by the Student Union 
Governing Board are for the first year only. Minor changes in the 
Long Term Parking Lease fee structure (p. 5, Section B) were also 
noted. 

Details of the liquor license were discussed in consider- 
able detail by the Trustees. Chairman Healey requested Mr. Grinnan, 
Manager of the Campus Center, to submit a detailed report of the 
liquor operation to the Board which would cover all aspects of use 
of the liquor license. 

After further discussion, it was, therefore, moved, 
seconded and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 

the following schedule of rates, fees, rentals 
and other charges for the use of accommodations 
in and good and services provided in the pro- 
ject undertaken by University of Massachusetts 
Building Authority pursuant to amended request 
made June 28, 1968 by authority of the Trustees 
of the University of Massachusetts that said 
Authority undertake a project to provide dining, 
housing and parking garage and other extra- 
curricular facilities at the campus of the Uni- 
versity in the towns of Amherst and Hadley, said 
project being known as the Eleventh Project of 
the Authority, be and hereby is approved, namely: 



\ 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Student Use Fee 

$19.00 as the fee for graduate students and 
$24.00 as the fee for undergraduate students 
on a semester basis, to be paid by students 
at the University of Massachusetts in Amherst 
and Hadley for use of the Campus Center in- 
cluded in said Eleventh Project of the 
Authority: 

Meeting Room Fees 

Single Session Use 

Rooms accommodating 1-15 persons $ 7.50 per 

15-50 persons 15.00 per 

50-150 persons 25.00 per 

150-250 persons 50.00 per 

250-700 persons 100.00 per 



session 
session 
session 
session 
session 



Multiple Sessions Use* (sessions must be consecutive) 









SESSIONS 




Rooms accommodating 








Full 


- ... r 




1st 


2nd 


3rd 


Day 


1-15 persons 




7.50 


5.00 


5.00 


17.50 


15-50 persons 




15.00 


7.50 


5.00 


27.50 


50-150 persons 




25.00 


12.50 


10.00 


47.50 


150-250 persons 




50.00 


25.00 


10.00 


85.00 


250-700 persons 




100.00 


50.00 


25.00 


175.00 


There are three 


sessions in 


a day - 


morning, 





afternoon and evening. 



354? 



Accommodations Fees 



Twin Bed Rooms 

Single Occupancy 
Double Occupancy 

One Room Suites 

Single Occupancy 
Double Occupancy 

Two Room Suites 

Single Occupancy 
Double Occupancy 



$14.00 
18.00 



$18, 
22, 



00 
00 



$27.00 
31.00 



Children's rollaway cot - $3.00 
Rates for seven or more days - 907o of above 



3548 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Parking Fees 

Short Term Parking Fees 
$ .25 - first hour 

.15 - each additional hour 
2 . 00 - day maximum 

Long Term Parking Lease Fees - Other Than Students 
$85.00 - semester 

22.50 - per month for June, July, August 
250.00 - twelve months 

Long Term Parking Lease Fees - Students 
$75.00 - semester 

17.50 - per month for June, July, August 
185.00 - twelve months 

Conference Fees 

Applicable to groups of 40 or more persons 
present for more than five consecutive hours: 

$5.00 per registered participant for 

programs of one full day when no 
overnight arrangements nor more 
than three meal periods (as part 
of the program) have to be con- 
sidered 

7.50 per registered participant for 
programs of one to three days 

10.00 per registered participant for 
programs of a week 

15.00 per registered participant for 
programs of two weeks 



Group Dining Service 
Tray Type Service 



Breakfast $1.25 and up 
Lunch 1 . 50 and up 
1 . 90 and up 



Dialog Room &. Banquet 
Service 



Dinner 



Breakfast 

Lunch 

Dinner 



$1.50 and up 
2.00 and up 
3.75 and up 



Individual and Other Service 



Such charges as the Authority or its delegate may 



fix. 



1 



COMMITTEE 



1 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
the making of a Management and Services 
Agreement between the Trustees of the Uni- 
versity of Massachusetts, acting in the 
name and on behalf of The Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts, and University of Massac- 
husetts Building Authority pursuant to 
Chapter 773 of the Acts of 1960, as amended, 
pertaining to the Eleventh Project of the 
Authority, being a project to provide dining, 
housing and parking garage and other extra- 
curricular facilities at the campus of the 
University in the towns of Amherst and 
Hadley requested by authority of said 
Trustees on June 28, 1968 to be constructed 
by the Authority as authorized; that the 
form of such Management and Services Agree- 
ment presented to this meeting and each 
term, condition and provision therein con- 
tained be and the same hereby is approved; 
that said Trustees or a majority thereof be 
and hereby are authorized, in the name and 
on behalf of The Commonwealth of Massachu- 
setts, to sign, acknowledge if deemed ad- 
visable and deliver a Management and Ser- 
vices Agreement in the form presented to 
this meeting and to cause the common seal 
of said University and of said Trustees 
to be affixed thereto; and that the taking 
of such action by said Trustees shall be 
conclusive evidence that the same is hereby 
authorized and that the form of Management 
and Services Agreement so executed is as 
hereby authorized and approved. 

The matter of Honorary Degrees - Revision of Procedure 
was discussed by Chairman Healey and the members of the committee. 
A memorandum will shortly come from the Chairman's office on this 
subject. 

Mr. Ronald Rabin reported on details of the sub-contract- 
ors work with problems at Columbia Point connected with decomposi- 
tion of site material. These men are experts in their field. They 
do not see insurmountable problems in site development. 

Mr. Rabin noted that his firm had thoroughly researched 
the question of methane control and that "this is not a great 
problem." He described the method of control by putting down two 
feet or so of gravel and laying perforated pipe which is either 
vented or dispersed through a leaching field. Methane has only be- 
come explosive where it has been completely sealed off. He added 
that methane is not present at every spot on the site. 



3549 



Honorary 
Degrees - 
R e vision of 
Procedure 

Columbia 
Point - 
Site 



3550 



COMMITTEE 



Transfers 

Subsidiary 
Accounts -- 
UM/Amherst 
UM/Boston 



UM/Amherst 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Chairman Healey summed up that "a definitive study is 
underway in depth," and "we feel we can handle the problem." 

It was then moved, seconded and 

VOTED : That the Executive Committee of the Board 
of Trustees reaffirms its commitment to 
the site at Columbia Point as a viable lo- 
cation for the permanent campus of the 
University of Massachusetts at Boston. 

Vice-Chancellor Hamilton, UM/Boston, was directed to pre- 
pare a letter of response to Commissioner Dwight for hand delivery 
at the State House on Thursday, May 21, 1970. A copy of this letter 
has been circulated to the Board of Trustees. 

Budget transfers UM/Amherst, UM/Boston and UM/Worcester 
were discussed. The Treasurer noted that time is running out and 
the State Comptroller has set a deadline, so that action by the 
Executive Committee prior to the full Board of Trustees meeting on 
May 29 is required. 

After extended discussion of the transfers for Worcester, 
it was agreed that action on these would be deferred. This item 
has been circulated to the Trustees and will be considered at the 
meeting of May 29. It was then moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To approve transfers between subsidiary 
accounts for UM/Amherst and UM/Boston 
as set forth below: 

UM/Amherst 

From: Account 1350-01-01 Salaries, Permanent* $119,000.00 

1350-01-04 Food for Persons** 1,450.00 

1350-01-06 Housekeeping Supplies** 3,500.00 

1350-01-08 Heat and Other Plant 80,000.00 

Operations 

To: Account 1350-01-02 Salaries, Other* 75,000.00 

1350-01-03 Services, Non- 
Employees 124,000.00 

1350-01-10 Travel and Automotive 

Expenses 4,950.00 

1350-01-14 Office and Administra- 
tive Expenses** 80,000.00 

*This transfer is to provide funds to balance the salary 
account and provide additional funds for overtime, re- 
cruitment, summer session and student labor. 

**This tranfer is to provide funds for automotive expenses, 
travel funds, postage and telephone. 



E 



I 



COMMITTEE 



I 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



UM/ Boston 

From: Account 135Q-02-08_ Heat and Other Plant $ 5,000.00 

Operations 
Repair, Alterations 14,000.00 

and Additions 
Special Supplies 30,000.00 
Rentals 8,500.00 

Services, Non- 3,300.00 

Employees* 

Services, Non- 30,000.00 

Employees 
Travel and Automo- 3,000.00 

motive Expenses 
Advertising and 10,500.00 

Printing 
Office and Admini- 14,000.00 

strative Expenses 
Travel and Automo- 300.00 

tive Expenses 
Special Supplies and 3,000.00 

Expenses 



1350-02-12 

1350-02-13 
1350-02-16 
1350-81-03 



To: Account 1350-02-03 
1350-02-10 
1350-02-11 
1350-02-14 
1350-81-10 
1350-81-13 



This transfer is to provide funds for summer 
session, student labor and increased recruit- 
ing of faculty. Also to publish a second 
catalogue and for additional telephone expenses. 

-'The transfer in the Disadvantaged student 
account is to provide for special supplies and 
travel. 

Treasurer Johnson introduced for approval the buy and 
sell agreement re the Hodgkins Cove property. 

After discussion, it was moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To authorize the Treasurer of the University, 
Kenneth W. Johnson, acting for and in the 
name of the Trustees to execute an Agreement 
between the Trustees and the University of 
Massachusetts Foundation, Inc. pertaining to 
the use of the Foundation's property at 
Hodgkins Cove, Gloucester, and financial 
assistance thereof in the form as submitted 
to this meeting and on file in the Treasurer's 
Office; and to take all other actions 
necessary or desirable to implement the 
agreement. 



3551 



Hodgkins 

Cove 

Property 



3552 



Governance 
UM/ Boston 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Governance - UM/ Bos ton was discussed. Chancellor 
Broderlck hopes to have a negotiating session arranged soon on 
this matter with appropriate members of the UM/Boston community. 
Chairman Healey added that the Trustees will have a working 
session on this matter in the future. 

The meeting was adjourned at 5:30 p.m. 



I 




Robert J. McCartney 
Secr^t^iry, Board of /trustees 



I 



I 



I 



COMMITTEE 



I 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON 
FACULTY AND EDUCATIONAL POLICY 

June 4, 1970, 11:00 a.m., Room 170, Parker House, Boston 

PRESENT : Chairman Troy, President Lederle; Trustees Greenblatt, 
Lambson, Lyons, Maginnis; Secretary McCartney 

From UM/B : Chancellor Broderick, Dean Gagnon; Profes- 
sor Ernest Becker, Chairman, Department of Chemistry 

Professor Walter J. Lehmann 
Counsel: Mr. Shubow 

Counsel for the University: Mr. Broadhurst 

Present as Observers at Professor Lehmann' s request : 
UM/B Professors Gittleman, Mahon, Roberts; Mr. Farren 

Chairman Troy convened the meeting at 11:00 a.m. for the 
purpose of hearing the grievance petition of Professor Walter J. 
Lehmann . 

Messrs Farren, Gittleman, Mahon, and Roberts stated, and 
Professor Lehmann confirmed that they were present at the request of 
Professor Lehmann. Mr. Farren also stated that he was not present 
in the capacity of a newspaper reporter. 

Chairman Troy reviewed the procedures of the Committee on 
Faculty and Educational Policy in personnel cases. 

Mr. Shubow requested a transcript of the hearing and it was 
agreed that the Secretary would give Mr. Shubow access to the tape 
recording of the proceedings made by the Secretary. 

Mr. Broadhurst reviewed the material on the case as pre- 
sented to the Committee on Faculty and Educational Policy: 

Memorandum from the Office of the President to the Commit - 
tee , dated February 25, 1970--Attached bound material as 
the file in the Lehmann case, said to be arranged in chron 
ological sequence beginning with Dr. Becker's letter 
dated June 16, 1969, and containing three appendices: 

Appendix A : Professor Lehmann' s Personnel Action forms 
and Faculty Evaluation reports. 

Appendix B : Documents submitted by Professor Lehmann in 
support of his seven-page brief, dated November 3, 1969. 

Appendix C : Trustee Documents numbered 64-061 and 
63-050, which set forth the rules and regulations govern- 
ing tenure and appointment policy. 



r;r,o 



355: 



F & EP 
6-4-70 



Grievance 
Petition- 
Walter J. 
Lehmann 



3554 



F & EP 
6-4-70 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Also distributed at the meeting was certain other material 
presented by Professor Lehmann. 

Mr. Shubow made an opening statement. Professor Lehmann 
made a statement. Professor Becker and Dean Gagnon also made state- 
ments and Chancellor Broderick made a brief statement. Each speaker 
responded to questions and there was general discussion. Professor 
Lehmann made a concluding statement. 

During the course of the session there was a brief recess 
for lunch. The meeting was adjourned at 3:20 p.m. 




)ert J 
Secretary, 





"artney 
fard of Trusted 



I 



1 



COMMITTEE 



1 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON 

BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS 

June 24, 1970, 10:30 a.m., Room 403, Statler Hilton Hotel, Boston 

PRESENT: Chairman Haigis , President-elect Wood; Trustees 
Crowley, Knowles, Maginnis, Pumphret; Treasurer 
Johnson, Mrs. Hull. 

From UM/A : Chancellor Tippo, Mr. Littlefield 

From UM/B : Chancellor Broderick, Vice-Chancellor 
Hamilton, Mr. O'Brien 

Chairman Haigis convened the meeting at 10:30 a.m. and 
requested Treasurer Johnson to review the first agenda item— Naming 
of Buildings--UM/Amherst. 



Treasurer Johnson reviewed the names which have been pro- 
posed for the three dormitories now under construction in Project 
Twelve. After discussion it was agreed to name the new dormitories 
for three former Trustees: Harry Dunlap Brown, William Cashin, and 
Elizabeth McNamara,all of whom gave long and distinguished service 
to the University. 

Harry Dunlap Brown served as Trustee, University of Massa- 
chusetts, from January 3, 1940, through January, 1968. He graduated 
from Massachusetts Agricultural College in 1914 and was awarded an 
Honorary Doctor of Law degree from the University of Massachusetts 
in June, 1964. He received the Distinguished Service Award from the 
Alumni Association, University of Massachusetts, in June, 1959, and 
also served as President and Director of the Association. Mr. Brown 
was a former Director and Clerk of the University of Massachusetts 
Building Association, Inc. He also served the Commonwealth as Repre 
sentative in the General Court from 1929 to 1934. 

On motion made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that a Dormitory, 
Project Twelve, be named in honor of former Trustee 
Harry Dunlap Brown. 

William M. Cashin was appointed Trustee of the University 
of Massachusetts in January, 1949, by Governor Dever and reappointed 
in 1956 by Governor Herter. He also served as a member of the Uni- 
versity of Massachusetts Building Authority, as one of the original 
Trustee members, and later as a public member until the time of his 
death on July 11, 1969. 

On motion made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that a Dormitory, 
Project Twelve, be named in honor of former Trustee 
William M. Cashin. 



3555 



B & G 
6-24-70 



Naming Dormi- 
tories- 
Project Twelve 



Harry Dunlap 

Brown 

Dormitory 



William Cashin 
Dormitory 



3556 



B & G 
6-24-70 



COMMITTEE 



Elizabeth 

McNamara 

Dormitory 



Naming Married 
Student Housing 
Project, 
UM/ Amherst 



North Village 



North Village 
Road--Married 
Student Housing 
Project, 
UM/Amherst 

New Library, 
UM/Amherst- -"The 
University 
Library" 

East Pleasant 
Street By-pass 
Road, 
UM/Amherst 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Mrs. Elizabeth L. McNamara served as Trustee, University 
of Massachusetts, from 1937 to 1957. From 1937 to 1947 she served 
as Chairman of the Committee on the Extension Service, the Committee 
on Faculty and Educational Policy, and Committees on Experiment Sta- 
tion and Horticulture. From 1948 to 1957 she served on the Commit- 
tees on Legislation and Faculty and Educational Policy. She died 
on January 22, 1957, in Cambridge, Massachusetts. 

On motion made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that a Dormitory, 
Project Twelve, be named in honor of former Trustee 
Elizabeth L. McNamara. 

Naming of the Married Student Housing Project, UM/Amherst , 
was also discussed. Treasurer Johnson recommended that this, and 
similar projects, be given names that would provide geographical 
identification. 

After general discussion, it was moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that the Married 
Student Housing Project, UM/Amherst, be named North 
Village. 

It was also 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that the Access 
Road--Married Student Housing Project, UM/Amherst--be 
named North Village Road 



The Name for the New Library, UM/Amherst was discussed, 
was pointed out that by action of the Board of Trustees on May 31, 
1968, the new library had been designated "The University Library." 



It 



The status of the East Pleasant Street By-pass Road was 
reviewed by Mr. Littlefield. These plans have had their most recent 
review at a meeting held by the DPW at which town officials were 
present, as well as legislators from the area. Alternates to the 
present plans were discussed, and these will be presented for dis- 
cussion at a public hearing in Amherst to be held at a later date. 
Mr. Littlefield also discussed the location of the site which the 
University has agreed to provide to the Town of Amherst for con- 
struction of an auxiliary fire station to serve the campus and North 
Amherst. He also pointed out the location of the corridor road 
which is to be constructed through the Tillson Farm property. 

After further discussion, it was moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that the Plans 

for the East Pleasant Street By-pass Road, UM/Amherst, 
be approved as presented as to their location on Uni- 
versity property and general concepts. . 



1 



COMMITTEE 



1 



1 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

It was also 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that the plan to 
reserve a corridor for a road through the Tillson Farm 
Property be approved as presented to provide for a 
future connection from East Pleasant Street to North 
East Street. 

It was also 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that a parcel of 
land be reserved as a site for an Amherst fire station 
at or in the vicinity of the intersection of the new 
proposed East Pleasant Street By-pass Road and the 
existing East Pleasant Street said site to be on the 
southerly side of the new road in the orchard. 

On the matter of the Surplus Property Building, New Salem , 
UM/Amherst , Treasurer Johnson said that he has been notified by the 
Surplus Property Agent that the equipment is being removed from the 
building. The University administration is not interested, Mr. John- 
son said, in acquiring the building without the equipment. 

Rents on Married Student Apartments--UM/ Amherst , was dis- 
cussed by Mr. Littlefield. Noting that the rents for the University 
apartments now under construction would be considerably higher than 
those currently charged for Lincoln and University Apartments, Mr. 
Littlefield said that it would be necessary to equalize the rent 
schedules for all University apartments, in the interest of fairness 
to all students. In the case of the Lincoln and University Apart- 
ments, an average $70-$80 increase will be necessary in order to 
equalize rentals, and to place these units on a self-liquidating 
basis. 

It was agreed that as much time as possible would be given 
of notice of rent increases to tenants in the Lincoln and University 
Apartments. After extensive discussion, there was a consensus as 
follows : 

(1) Married Student Apartment rentals should be as uniform as 
possible for comparable accommodations. 

(2) Past policies on University and Lincoln Apartments are to be 
r changed to house mainly married students. 

(3) The principle of sharing maintenance costs between self- 
liquidating apartment projects so as to aid in equalizing 
apartment rentals would be adopted. 

(4) In increasing the rents on University and Lincoln Apartments 
the administration would announce an expected increase now 
to be effective in four months. 



355: 



K~Z 



B & G 
6-24-70 

Corridor Road- 
East Pleasant St, 
to N. East St. 



Fire Station 

Site--By-pass 

Road 



Surplus Property 
Building, New 
Salem 



Rents --Married 
Student Apart- 
ments , UM/Amherst 

Doc. T70-129 . 



3558 



B & G 
6-24-70 



COMMITTEE 



Rent- -Anderson 

House, 

UM/Worcester 



Fine Arts 
Building, 
UM/ Amherst 



SCUP Conference 



Ground-breaking, 
Columbia Point 



Status — Site and 
Building Design, 
UM/ Boston 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

(5) Specific votes and rental rates would be presented to the 
next meeting of the Committee. 

Rent on the Anderson House, UM/Worcester , was next dis- 
cussed. This one-story, three-bedroom house was purchased by the 
State for the Medical School site. It has been proposed that this 
property be used to house 4-6 Medical School students for the aca- 
demic year '70- '71, at a fee of $200 per semester. 

It was the consensus of the committee that, if the property 
is to be used in this manner, fees should be charged on the same 
basis as dormitory charges at UM/ Amherst. This matter is to have 
further discussion. 

Treasurer Johnson next presented for review the Plans for 
the Fine Arts Building, UM/Amherst . Mr. Littlefield announced 
federal awards for this building totaling $560,000. Target dates 
set by the BBC for the Fine Arts Building are July 20, 1970, for bid 
advertising; September 1, 1970, for the opening of bids; and Octo- 
ber 1, 1970, for the start of construction. Before construction 
starts, Mr. Littlefield said, the campus pond is to be temporarily 
bridged and all temporary walks and fencing installed in order not 
to inconvenience students crossing the campus in the pond area. The 
appropriation for the Fine Arts Building is now at $13,800,000. 

After further discussion, it was moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that the Final 
Plans and Specifications for the Fine Arts Building, 
UM/Amherst, as presented by the architectural firm of 
Roche & Dinkeloo and as detailed in Document T70-128 
be approved. 

Mr. Littlefield also announced that the opening event in 
the Murray D. Lincoln Campus Center is to be a Conference for The 
Society for College and University Planning to be held August 9 
through August 12, 1970. A reception is to be held on the evening 
of August 9, to be hosted by Chancellor Tippo and the Board of 
Trustees in honor of distinguished architects who have had work com- 
missioned on the Amherst campus. It is hoped that a goodly number 
of Trustees will be able to attend. 

UM/ Bos ton Agenda Items were reviewed by Vice-Chancellor 
Hamilton and Mr. O'Brien. Vice-Chancellor Hamilton announced that 
word had been received from the Governor's Office of plans to hold a 
Ground-breaking for the Columbia Point Campus during the second week 
in July. It is assumed that further details will shortly be made 
available to the University administration and the Board of Trustees 

Mr. O'Brien reported on the Status of Site Design and 
Building Design, UM/Boston . Work is now on schedule, Mr. O'Brien 



said, although some overtime may be necessary later on if the pro- 
ject is to be kept on schedule. The cost of overtime work, if it is 
necessary, cannot now be estimated, Mr. O'Brien said. Construction 



1 



COMMITTEE 



i 



! 

I 



3559 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

of the Science Building is expected to be the most difficult; 2% to 
3 years is allowed for construction of this project. 

The estimates of the engineering firm of Charles T. Main, 
Inc., are some $1,000,000 over budget at this time, Mr. O'Brien said 
To bring these estimates into line, it is proposed that the width of 
the promenade be reduced from 19 to 12 feet and changes made in the 
power plant services. Another change which is being considered is to 
eliminate the dike on the eastern shore of the site. The soil con- 
sultants consider this feasible, Mr. O'Brien said, as the soil is 
relatively stable here, and there is also a natural bluff along this 
shoreline. The promenade, it was pointed out, could continue even 
if the dike did not, as a crushed stone drive. 

As adoption of these plans for the site would involve a 
change in the Master Plan Concept, it was agreed that Vice-Chancellor 
Hamilton and Mr. O'Brien would present more information on this mat- 
ter at the full Board meeting on June 29'. More complete information 
as to possible storm damage to the site will also be presented. 

Vice-Chancellor Hamilton reported that there is now general 
agreement that the available water supply will be inadequate for the 
Columbia Point campus. 2,000 gallons per minute will be required; 
the City of Boston can supply only 1,500. Although the City is con- 
sidering the possibility of improving the supply, Vice-Chancellor 
Hamilton said, it is still a distinct possibility that it will be 
necessary to construct an on-site reservoir at Columbia Point. 

Status of Transit, UM/Boston , was discussed by Vice-Chan- 
cellor Hamilton. Efforts to obtain funds from the Governor and the 
Legislature for a transit study have been unsuccessful. It is not 
expected that there will be a transit connection between the campus 
and Columbia Circle by the projected September 1972 opening of the 
Columbia Point campus. Surface busses, Vice-Chancellor Hamilton 
said, seem to be the most likely solution to the transportation 
problem. 

After further discussion, it was moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that the concept 
of bus terminal facilities on the Columbia Point campus 
be approved as presented. 

Vice-Chancellor Hamilton next discussed the Status of Bud - 
get Cuts, UM/Boston . For completion of Phase l--Construction of the 
Columbia Point campus, the Governor has recommended only 80 million 
out of the 100 million originally appropriated. The BBC has deferrec 
funding equipment requirements and has adjusted contingency figures 
as a temporary measure, but it is expected that it will be necessary 
to request the Governor to restore the full amount of the original 
appropriation in order to complete the project. 

Mr. O'Brien reviewed the Status of College Three Planning . 
Plans are now over budget by about 10%, largely due to expected 



B & G 
6-24-70 



Water Supply-- 
Columbia Point 



Transit-- 
Columbia Point 



Budget Cuts- 
UM/Boston 



College Three-- 
Columbia Point 



3560 



B & G 
6-24-70 



COMMITTEE 



Lease — 

20 Boylston St. , 

UM/Boston 



Phase V 
Renovations-- 
100 Arlington St 
UM/Boston 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

escalation. No architect has yet been selected, but much of the 
planning will be a duplication of plans for Colleges One and Two. 

Vice-chancellor Hamilton reported that he has completed 
arrangements to lease 15,500 square feet of space at 20 Boylston 
Street. This will provide additional classroom space at a rental 
figure of $5.70 per square foot. This figure includes complete 
renovation and air conditioning of the rented space. 

After discussion, it was moved, seconded and 

VOTED: To recommend to the Board of Trustees that Vice-Chancel- 
lor William R. Hamilton be authorized to complete nego- 
tiations for rental of 15,500 square feet of space at 
20 Boylston Street for a period of three years at a 
rental figure of $5.70 per square foot, which is to 
include complete renovations and air conditioning 
(Doc. T70-133). 

Vice-chancellor Hamilton also announced tentative plans to 
rent additional space for up to 46 faculty offices at the Hotel 
Bradford. 

The scheduled Phase V Renovations at 100 Arlington Street , 
UM/Boston , to provide primarily for science laboratories, were 
reviewed by Vice-Chancellor Hamilton. These renovations will provide 
space for the projected enrollment of 4,000 for 1970-71. 

After discussion, it was moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that Vice-Chancel- 
lor William R. Hamilton be authorized to enter into con- 
tracts for Phase V Renovations-- 100 Arlington Street — 
UM/Boston, at a contract figure not to exceed the 
appropriation of $275,000. 

The meeting was adjourned at 2:45 p.m. 




:t J. 
Secretary, Bo 



1 



COMMITTEE 



I 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 
June 29, 1970, 11:00 a.m., Wareham Field Station, Wareham 



PRESENT: 



Committee Members and Trustee Staff: 



Chairman Healey, President Lederle, President-elect 
Wood; Trustees Gordon, Haigis , Pumphret, Rowland, Troy; 
Treasurer Johnson, Mrs. Hull 

Others 

Attending: Trustees Elters, Shaler 

From UM/A : Chancellor Tippo; Associate Provosts Allen 
and Gluckstern; Director of Planning Littlefield 

From UM/B : Chancellor Broderick, Vice-Chancellor 
Hamilton 

From UM/W : Dean Soutter 

The meeting was convened by Chairman Healey at 11:15 a.m. 

Fees, UM/Worcester , was taken up as the first agenda item, 
due to the illness of Dean Soutter (who left the meeting after dis- 
cussion of certain matters related to the Medical School) . A memo- 
randum was distributed which reviewed tuition fees, set earlier by 
the Board, and other student fees. Rental of the house at 382 Plan- 
tation Street to students, which had been referred from the Committee 
on Buildings and Grounds was also discussed. Due to the severe 
shortage in Worcester of suitable rooms for students, it is proposed 
that this building be used to house four students for this academic 
year, and possibly for another year or two, at a rental figure of 
$400 per student. This is lower than the housing fees charged at 
Amherst, but the accommodations and services are not comparable with 
the Amherst residence halls. Students will have to provide their own 
janitor service. It is expected that the income of $1600 will just 
about cover operating and maintenance expenses. 

After discussion, it was moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that student fees 
per academic year for the Medical School be established 
as follows: 

Single Married 



Tuition 

Equipment Maintenance Fee 

(Trust Fund) 
Health Fee (Trust Fund) 
Optional Insurance—sickness and 

accident, per contract 
I.D. Card (Trust Fund) 

Total fee per person 



$600 $600 



35 


35 


70 


70 


27 


151 


1 


1 



$733 $857 



3561 



Executive 
6-29-70 



Fees , 
UM/Worcester 



Rental of House 
to Students 



356^ 



Executive 
6-29-70 



COMMITTEE 



Progress Report- 
Medical School 
Construction 



1970-71 Operat- 
ing Budgets 

Doc. T70-126 



Staffing of 
President' s 
Office 



Amherst Trust 
Fund Budgets , 
1970-71 



Trust Fund 
Budgets , 
UM/Boston and 
UM/Worcester 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

It was also 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees to authorize the 
use of the house at 382 Plantation Street to house stu- 
dents at the Medical School at a rental rate of $200 
per semester, provided that the students will perform 
their own janitorial and other services other than 
utilities which will be furnished. 

Dean Soutter also presented a progress report on Medical 
School construction. The power plant and site work estimates are 
running over budget, but the sub-bids on the Medical Science Building 
are coming in close to estimates. 

Funding of the Medical School Teaching Hospital project 
is, however, becoming a matter of serious concern, Dean Soutter said. 
HEW funding of the award of $16 million is being delayed pending 
State action, and it is hoped that further negotiations on this mat- 
ter can be arranged. Dean Soutter stressed the urgency of the 
situation. The State appropriation is before the Legislature in the 
capital outlay budget now being considered. 

1970-71 Operating Budgets were next discussed. Budget 
materials had been distributed by mail. Treasurer Johnson noted 
that positions to staff the President's Office had been loaned from 
UM/ Amherst, and that UM/Boston and UM/Worcester would also be loan- 
ing either positions or funds. The Treasurer noted that President 
Lederle had operated with little support staff within the President's 
Office and that, therefore, few President's Office positions were 
available. No new positions are being created at this time for the 
President's Office. A supplemental budget request for office rental 
and furnishings, etc., for the President has been submitted. It was 
noted that, pending final State appropriations, new and anticipated 
funds are budgeted as reserve for distribution on each campus as soott 
as the exact amounts are known. 

Amherst Trust Fund Budgets were next discussed. Treasurer 
Johnson noted that this income is derived from gifts, some of which 
provide for discretionary use of funds by the President; other gifts 
stipulate that the income be used for specific programs on the 
Amherst campus. Additional Trust Funds are provided through Alumni 
Funds. These budgets are detailed in Document T70-126. 

Trust Funds, UM/Boston and UM/Worcester, are also detailed 
in Document T70-126. Vice-Chancellor Hamilton expressed apprecia- 
tion of Treasurer Johnson's efforts to establish UM/Boston Trust 
Funds on a regularized basis. He also urged, for the record, that 
all University Trust Funds from various sources be reviewed with 
respect to their possible reallocation. 

Chairman Healey noted that the Executive Committee had had 
opportunity for only brief study of the 1970-71 Operating Budgets 
and the Campus Trust Fund Budgets. Both the 1970-71 Operating 
Budgets and the Trust Fund Budgets, therefore, will be presented to 



3563 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

the full Board for approval without the Executive Committee's formal 
recommendation, due to lack of time for detailed study by the commit 
tee. Chairman Healey stated that there is no objection, however, by 
any member of the committee on the basis of their review, of any item 
in the 1970-71 Operating Budgets or the Trust Fund Budgets as pre- 
sented. 

Treasurer Johnson noted that a Federal Grant in the amount 
of $130,000 had been awarded to the School of Education, UM/Amherst, 
for the evaluation of grants and awards made under Title I of the 
Education Act of a few years ago. As Treasurer Johnson will be 
unable to be in Washington for the signing of this contract on 
June 30, it is requested that Mr. Sidney Myers, Staff Attorney, 
UM/Amherst, be authorized to sign for and in the name of the Univer- 
sity of Massachusetts. 

After discussion, it was moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that it authorize 
Sidney Myers, Staff Attorney, UM/Amherst, to sign for 
and in the name of the University of Massachusetts a cer 
tain contract in the amount of $130,000.00 with the 
Office of Education, Department of Health, Education and 
Welfare. 

Chairman Healey next turned to the matter of disposal of 
one Morgan horse, Bay State Ivy #011476, which has been declared sur- 
plus by the College of Agriculture. On the basis of the independent 
appraisals which have been made, it is recommended that this horse be 
sold to Mrs. John W. Lederle for the sum of $675.00, the purchase 
price money to be provided from private donations made available for 
the purchase by the President's Testimonial Gift Committee. Chairman 
lealey observed that Mrs. Lederle had taken much personal care of 
this nine-year-old mare. 

After discussion, it was moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that, on the basis 
of two appraisals received, it authorize the Treasurer 
of the University, Kenneth W. Johnson, to sell the Morgar: 
horse "Ivy" (Reg. #011476, if any), said horse having 
been declared surplus by the College of Agriculture, to 
Mrs. John W. Lederle for the sum of $675.00, the pur- 
chase price money to be provided from private donations 
made available for the purchase by the President's Testi- 
monial Gift Committee. 

It was also moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To recommend the following resolution to the Board of 
Trustees : 

Whereas , the energetic and creative interest of Mrs. 
John W. Lederle was greatly instrumental, in cooperation 
with the Dean of the College of Agriculture and others, 



Executive 
6-29-70 



Authorization- 
Signing of 
HEW Contract 
School of 
Education -- 
UM/Amherst 



Purchase-- 
Morgan Horse 

Mrs. John W. 
Lederle 



3564 



Executive 
6-29-70 



COMMITTEE 



Report- -Committe< 
on Government 
and University 
Relations 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

in revitalizing this program, and 

Whereas, Mrs. John W. Lederle contributed generously of 
her time over the past ten years for the advancement of 
this program, working with both secondary and University 
students, Now, therefore , the Board of Trustees extends 
to Mrs. John W. Lederle its sincere congratulations for 
her exceptional contribution to the Morgan horse pro- 
gram, and its special appreciation for her achievement 
on behalf of the hundreds of students who now take 
advantage of this program through regular courses in 
the University curriculum, or on an extracurricular 
basis for recreational purposes. 

Trustee Gordon, Chairman of the Committee on Government and 
University Relations noted that the committee was currently holding a 
series of meetings with President Wood. A committee report will be 
presented at the August meeting. 

The meeting was adjourned at 12:05 p.m. 



I 




Robert 
Secretary, B 




cCartney 
d of Trustee 



COMMITTEE 



I 



I 



356 



o 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON 
FACULTY AND EDUCATIONAL POLICY 

July 9, 1970, 10:30 a.m., Old Boston Room, Parker House, Boston 

PRESENT: Committee Members and Trustee Staff : 

Chairman Troy, President Wood; Trustees Abrams , 
Elters, Maginnis, Lambson; Mrs. Hull 

Administrators, Faculty, Staff, and Invited Guests : 
From UM/A : Chancellor Tippo; Associate Provosts 
Allen and Gluckstern; Deans Appley and Shapiro; Pro- 
fessors Gibson, Korson, Lee, Lynch, Naff, Sheckels 

From UM/B : Dean of Faculty Gagnon, Professor Robert 
Hoopes 

From UM/W : Dean Soutter, Associate Dean Saunders. 
The following Heads of Departments — Medical School: 
Dr. Sam Clark, Anatomy; Dr. H. Maurice Goodman, Physi 
ology; Dr. Hugh Fulmer, Community Medicine; Dr. 
Richard MacDonald, Pathology 

The meeting was convened by Chairman Troy at 10:45 a.m. 
College of Arts and Sciences Reorganization, UM/ Amherst , the first 
agenda item, was reviewed by Acting Dean Seymour Shapiro who traced 
the history of this proposal for tripartite organization of the Col- 
lege of Arts and Sciences and recommended its immediate implementa- 
tion (Document T7 1-002). 

College of Arts and Sciences reorganization has been under 
consideration for several years and has been undergoing extensive 
debate and review by the faculty for the past two years. The plan 
as now presented was approved by vote of 59% of the faculty in a 
mail balldt of March 1970. Called for is division of the College 
into three Faculties: (a) The Faculty of Humanities and Fine Arts, 
(b) The Faculty of Social and Behavioral Sciences, and (c) The 
Faculty of Natural Sciences and Mathematics. Each Faculty shall have 
its own separate and independent Dean. Each Dean would serve a term 
as Coordinating Dean for a one- or two-year term. 

The College which is the combination of the three Faculties 
will support the following unifying and joint activities: Office of 
Faculty Personnel, College Business Office, College Honors Program, 
CASIAC (for undergraduate academic affairs). It is expected that 
these activities would be housed largely in South College. 

There was general discussion of the plan as presented and 
Dean Shapiro answered questions on various aspects of the proposed 
reorganization from Trustees and faculty members present. 

After further discussion, it was moved, seconded and 



F & EP 
7-9-70 



Reorganization 
College of Arts 
and Sciences-- 
UM/ Amherst 



3566 



F & EP 
7-9-70 



COMMITTEE 



Changes in Uni- 
versity Core 
Requirements , 
UM/Amherst 



Change in Univer- 
sity Rhetoric 
Requirement , 
UM/Amherst 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that the 

UM/Amherst College of Arts and Sciences Proposal for 
Tripartite Organization be approved for immediate 
implementation as detailed in Document T7 1-002. 

Changes in University Core Requirements, UM/Amherst, were 
next discussed by Associate Provost Jeremiah Allen. The Faculty 
Senate at its 160th meeting voted to recommend certain changes in 
the core requirements. These changes would allow students greater 
flexibility and freedom of choice in satisfying University require- 
ments, and would also allow more depth in one discipline to be sub- 
stituted for sampling in another. This special report of the Aca- 
demic Matters Subcommittee is contained in Faculty Senate Document 
70-080. Specific proposals for the core requirement changes and 
explanatory background material are outlined in Provost Allen's 
memorandum of June 2, 1970 (Trustee Document T71-003) . 

After general discussion, it was moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that the present 
core requirements C, D, and E be changed to read as 
follows : 

C. An introduction to the humanities and fine arts by 
the successful completion of three courses chosen 
from those identified by the letter C in the Uni- 
versity catalogue. 

D. An introduction to the social and behavioral sci- 
ences by the successful completion of three courses 
chosen from those identified by the letter D in the 
University catalogue. 

E. An introduction to mathematics and the natural sci- 
ences by the successful completion of three courses 
chosen from those identified by the letter E in the 
University catalogue. 

Change in University Rhetoric Requirement, UM/Amherst , was 
discussed in detail by Professor Walker Gibson, Head of the Freshman 
English Program. The proposed change in the Rhetoric requirement 
would provide greater flexibility for students in the Freshman Eng- 
lish Program in both writing and discussion. Specialized training 
for graduate teaching assistants is now incorporated within the pro- 
gram. 



and 



After further general discussion, it was moved, seconded 

VOTED: To recommend to the Board of Trustees that the present 
core requirement B be changed to read: 

B. An introduction to the theory and practice of writ- 
ing and speaking, and to the study of communication 
in our society, by the successful completion of two 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

courses in Rhetoric, one of which must be Rhetoric 100 
or Rhetoric 110. 

The proposal to establish an Undergraduate Major in Com - 
parative Literature was reviewed by Professor William Naff who noted 
the increasing demand for courses in Comparative Literature at the 
undergraduate level and the increasing outlets for this training. No 
new faculty or staff will be required. Involved will be the study of 
literature in two modern languages, a major and a minor, one of which 
may be English. Students majoring in Comparative Literature must 
also fulfill a requirement in a third language, modern or ancient, 
either by taking six hours of elementary course work in that language 
or by passing the relevant departmental reading examination. 

After discussion, and on motion made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that the estab- 
lishment of an Undergraduate Major in Comparative Litera 
ture in the College of Arts and Sciences, UM/ Amherst, 
leading to the B.A. degree be approved as detailed in 
Document T7 1-005. 

Undergraduate Program in Computer Systems Engineering , 
UM/Amherst, was discussed by Professor G. Dale Sheckels, Head of the 



356? 



F & EP 
7-9-70 



Undergraduate 
Major- -Comparative 
Literature, 

UM/ Amherst 



Department of Electrical Engineering and by Professor Imsong Lee, 
Head of the Computer Science Program. The proposed program repre- 
sents the response of the Electrical Engineering faculty, with the 
support of the Computer Science faculty, to the increasing demands 
in the field of computer technology. Expanded educational opportun- 
ity will be offered to all students in Computer Science and Electri- 
cal Engineering at the undergraduate level. It is also anticipated 
that the proposed program will provide a good foundation for a coop- 
erative graduate program in computer science to be offered later. 
Professor Sheckels reported NSF funding of the program in the amount 
of $2^,000 with matching state funds (Trustee Document T71-006). 

Professor Lee reviewed statistics for the computer indus- 
try, noting the explosive growth in this field, and the increasing 
need for trained people in the Commonwealth. At the present time the 
total number of engineers graduated in the state with specialized 
computer training numbers about 1^0, and some 5>00 are needed. The 
program, as proposed can get underway, Professor Sheckels said, with 
the present faculty. 



Undergraduate 
Program- -Computer 
Sys terms Engi- 
neering, 
UM/Amherst 



and 



After further general discussion, it was moved, seconded 



VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that the Under- 
graduate Program leading to a Bachelor of Science Degree 
in Computer Systems Engineering in the Department of 
Electrical Engineering be approved, as detailed in 
Document T71-006. 



3568 



F & EP 
7-9-70 



COMMITTEE 



Change in Univer- 
sity Sabbatical 
Leave Policy — 
UM/Amherst 



Ph.D. Program in 
Speech — 
UM/Amherst 



Medical School 
Curriculum — 
UM/Worcester 
Doc. T71-013 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Chancellor Tippo reviewed the Recommended Change in Sabbat 
tical Leave Policy, UM/Amherst . Noting that the University now has 
approximately twenty tenured tareer instructors," who carry heavy 
teaching loads and perform valuable departmental administrative work, 
he recommends a change in the present University sabbatical leave 
policy which now makes eligible only those f acilty members at the 
rank of Assistant Professor or above. The Chancellor recommended 
approval of the Faculty Senate resolution of April 30, 1970, that 
Instructors be made eligible for sabbatical leave after six years of 
full-time service (Document T70-130). 

After discussion, it was moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that the present 
Sabbatical Leave Policy adopted February 21, 1966, be 
amended to read: The opportunity shall be available 
to all full-time faculty members who hold the rank of 
Instructor or above and who have given the University 
six years of full-time service, as detailed in Document 
T70-130. 

Proposed Ph.D. Program in Speech — UM/Amherst was reviewed 
by Dean Appley of the Graduate School. This proposal focuses on 
five areas: Rhetoric, Speech-Theatre Education, Mass Communications 
Speech and Hearing Sciences, and Theatre. The Dean noted the indi- 
cations that demand for Ph.D. 's in Speech currently exceeds supply 
and that this demand is expected to increase. He also noted the 
shortage of high-quality Ph.D. programs in Speech in the Northeast, 
with the largest programs in the Big Ten universities. Nine out of 
ten of these are state institutions tending to limit their out-of- 
state enrollments which could 1 make the situation critical in the Com 
monwealth if this program were not offered at the University of 
Massachusetts. Dean Appley cited the number of high-caliber people 
already in the Department. 

Professor James Lynch of the Department of Speech was also 
present to answer questions related to the Rhetoric Program, which ii 
to be the first program set up under the proposed plan. 

After further discussion, it was moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that the establish 
ment of a Ph.D. Program in Speech be approved, as 
detailed in Document T70-131. 

The Medical School Curriculum — UM/Worcester was presented 
for discussion by Dean Soutter who pointed out that six and one-half 
years of preliminary work had preceded the reaching of this point in 
the history of the Medical School. Dean Soutter introduced new mem- 
bers of the Medical School faculty, who were present for discussion 
of the curriculum. Dr. Richard Saunders, Associate Dean of the Med- 
ical School for Academic Affairs, who assisted in recruiting this 
outstanding faculty was also present. 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

The following Heads of Departments spoke briefly to outline 
the curriculum within each department, and to answer questions from 
the committee: Dr. Sam Clark, Anatomy; Dr. H. Maurice Goodman, Physi 
ology; Dr. Hugh Fulmer, Community Medicine; Dr. Richard MacDonald, 
Pathology. The necessity, in an era of rapidly expanding medical 
information, of the individual physician keeping informed through a 
sustained process of self -education was stressed. Because of this 
need for the student to acquire the tools of self -education, a sig- 
nificant portion of the curriculum is to be planned and implemented 
by the student himself. Each student will thus gain first-hand knowl 
edge of problems in his particular field of interest under the guid- 
ance of a member of the faculty. 

The academic year is to be divided into two thirteen-week 
periods, with an additional six -week period set aside for special pro 
jects. Free, unscheduled time within each period is allowed which 
each student is expected to utilize for his own benefit. The major 
portion of time the first year will be devoted to study of Anatomy 
and Biochemistry, Biostatistics, and the study of Community Medicine. 
Most of the studies the second year will be in the departments of 
Pathology, Microbiology, and Pharmacology, along with continuing 
study of Community Medicine. Plans for the third and fourth years 
are now subject to continuing review as additions are made to the 
faculty of the clinical departments. 

Only three grades are permitted by the grading system 
adopted: fail, pass, and honors. The latter grade is reserved for a 
number of students in each class who have demonstrated exceptional 
interest, endeavor, and achievement. Included in the evaluation sys- 
tem is the requirement that all students take the examinations of the 
National Board of Medical Examiners. Promotion from one phase of the 
curriculum to the next will be determined by the Committee on Promo- 
tions which will consist of instructors from each department involved 
in teaching students during a given period of study. 

Dean Soutter could foresee a full class of 100 medical stu- 
dents by 197k' The Dean requested that there be three categories of 
appointments to the Medical School faculty: Clinical, Research, and 
Associate Professors. A memorandum on these appointment classifica- 
tions is to be sent to members of the Board of Trustees for their 
consideration at the request of Chairman Troy. 

Mnaia jiajor — UM/Boston (Document T71-010) which had been 
previously circulated to the Trustees was reviewed by Dean Gagnon. 
He noted one change in the document (p. 2) in the required number of 
lours. This requirement is to be reduced to 32-3U hours which is in 
line with similar programs. The Faculty Senate, UM/Boston, has 
approved the program as now presented. 

Trustee Abrams suggested the possibility of some form of 
cooperation between the New England Conservatory of Music and the 
UM/Boston Music Major Program within the Boston community. Dean 
lagnon said that he had recommended that the Chancellor and the Music 
Department contact the Conservatory and Massachusetts College of Art 
regarding the possibility of working cooperatively toward a Perform- 
ing Studio in Music and Art. Dean Gagnon said that he "hoped the 



3569 



F & EP 
7-9-70 



Grading System-- 
Medical School, 
UM/Worcester 



Music Major- 
UM/Boston 



3570 

F & EP 
7-9-70 



COMMITTEE 



Junior Year in 
Paris Budget — 
UM/Boston 



Princeton Plan 

Proposed Change 
in Calendar 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Trustees would look with favor upon exploration of such a possibility 
at some later date." 

After further discussion, it was moved, seconded and 

VOTED ; To recommend to the Board of Trustees establishment of a 
Music Major, UM/Boston, as detailed in Document T71-010. 

The Junior Year in Paris Budget — UM/Boston was next reviewed 
ay Dean Gagnon. He noted, with respect to some budget increases, the 
increased responsibilities of the Director of the Program. The bud- 
get, it was noted, has been reviewed by Dr. Barbara Burn, UM/Amherst, 
Director of International Programs. 

After discussion, it was moved, seconded and 

VOTED ; To recommend to the Board of Trustees approval of the 
Junior Year in Paris budget, UM/Boston, as detailed in 
Document T71-011. 

The Change in Calendar 1970-71--Princeton Plan, UM/Amherst , 
tfas reviewed by Chancellor Tippo. The Faculty Senate had devoted 
:auch time to discussion of this issue, the Chancellor said, and after 
Lengthy debate had voted to approve the modification of the "Princteon 
D lan" as described in Document T71-012. The Chancellor noted that th$ 
Student Senate had not had an opportunity to vote on the proposed 
plan, but that the Executive Committee of the Student Senate (number- 
ing lk students) had endorsed the plan as presented by the Faculty 
Senate. Eight class days are involved in the calendar change; all 
ire to be made up in various ways. 

Chancellor Tippo reviewed the "pros and cons" of the situa- 
tion. Arguments presented in favor of the modified Princeton Plan 
Include: (l) opportunity for students to work for change within the 
system; (2) an educational experience; (3) the danger that, if calen- 
dar changes are not approved, students would go home anyway causing 
iisruption in classroom work and schedules; (li) the eight class days 
Involved would be made up by cancellation of some scheduled reading 
lays, shortening of the examination period by two days, and the 
equivalent of two scheduled days in Saturday classes. 

The Chancellor • listed arguments against the modified plan 
as follows: (l) the fact that we are not following American Council 
nf Education guidelines which require that political -views time be 
made up from vacation time, not regular curricular time; (2) criticism 
)f payment of faculty salaries during what now could replace an extra 
reek of vacation; (3) the fact that the question would arise regarding 
;he rights of the staff to comparable released time if students and 
'acuity had this privilege; (I4.) the question as to how many students 
would actually participate seriously in political campaigns (noted 
lere was the disappointingly small number of students participating ir 
ihe April 10-11, 1970, cancellation of classes); and ($) the question 
as to why students and faculty should have this privilege when the 
ordinary citizen does not; and also (6) the vote of the Executive 



3571 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Committee of the Student Senate actually represented only a small 
number of students; and (7) the possibility of students actually not 
leaving the campus and thus engaging in political activity on campus 
and using University facilities. 

Chancellor Tippo also reviewed a file of pertinent material 
on this subject from various publications, especially noting news 
releases regarding a recent IRS statement involving tax-exempt status 
of educational institutions, and the possibility of HEW cutting funds 
of those institutions which shorten their academic year. He pointed 
out that only one state university — Rutgers — has adopted the plan. 
The Harvard faculty has voted against it, stating that educational 
priority came before political priority and that political activity 
should be an individual choice, not an institutional choice. 

Trustee Abrams observed that the primary dates would not 
necessarily coincide with the proposed released time schedule. 
Trustee Lambson pointed out that it was necessary to also consider 
the legal aspects of the situation. Trustee Maginnis expressed 
agreement with these positions, and concern, particularly, over the 
IRS situation. 

Associate Provost Allen stressed the traditional acceptance 
of the academic calendar as it is recommended by the Faculty Senate. 
The Academic Matters Committee of the Faculty Senate had debated this 
matter for three and one-half hours, he said, and some members of 
that group felt that an autumnal recess at the proposed time (roughly 
the middle of the Fall Semester) might be desirable on purely academi 
grounds . 

Chancellor Tippo observed that available reports indicated 
that, out of U3 leading universities (members of the American Associa' 
tion of Universities), only three had actually adopted the Princeton 
Plan. Associate Provost Allen noted that the latest issue of the 
Chronicle of Higher Education (July 6) reported that 16 institutions 



lad adopted "some form of recess," and that 13 had "definitely 
rejected" the plan. He suggested that perhaps in many instances a 
Final decision had not yet been made. 

Trustee Abrams suggested that a plan might be worked out 
thereby students could request released time for political activity 
as a matter of individual choice and that no examinations or papers 
se scheduled during this period and no penalties be imposed on stu- 
ients absent for this purpose. This suggestion merited considerable 
iiscussion by members of the committee and by others present. Chan- 
cellor Tippo pointed out that some faculty object to this suggestion 
because the absence of a sizeable percentage of students from classes 
jould disrupt the work in progress. He reported that the Abrams sug- 
gestion was the one being followed by Harvard with the added proviso 
that our faculty members are asked to announce at the first class mee 
Lng in the fall their intentions on requiring exams and papers during 
bhe period preceding the primary. 



F & EP 
7-9-70 



3572 



F & EP 
7-9-70 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Dean Shapiro expressed the view that time released to stu- 
dents for working in political campaigns would be a "valid educa- 
tional experience." He also emphasized the fact that it would be 
absolutely essential that students leave the campus for these activi' 
ties, if released time is approved. 

Trustee Elters presented the argument that "a fall recess 
would be valid on academic grounds," and that the time could be well 
used even if every student did not elect to engage in political 
activity. He also stated his belief that any threatened IRS action 
as to an institution's tax exempt status might be "politically moti- 
vated," and that, in any case, the proposed changes in the academic 
calendar were within the limits set by the IRS. 

Trustee Abrams noted that if vacations were to be given up 
for instance, the Christmas vacation, this would denote "real sin- 
cerity of purpose." 

Professor Korson stated that the Faculty Senate proposal 
had been made with the intent of adoption for a trial period of one 
year only. 

Trustees Maginnis and Lambson expressed opposition to any 
proposed modification of the Princeton Plan. Their position was 
that the University of Massachusetts "must be recognized as a public 
tax-supported institution accountable to all citizens of the Common- 
wealth." It is wrong, they felt, to disrupt the entire University 
campus at Amherst so that an uncertain number of students might 
engage in political activity. 

Trustee Lambson suggested that students anxious to engage 
in serious political activity could request permission to do so from 
their professors and make arrangements to make up work on an indi- 
vidual basis. 

Dean Gagnon said that the UM/Boston Faculty Senate had 
voted down the Princeton Plan, but that no papers or examinations 
would be required during the week prior to Election Day. 

Trustee Elters said that he thought "students had been 
sold out on the issues of the Chancellor search, coeducational dormi 
tories, and ROTC." He forecast much student discontent if the 
Princeton Plan is defeated. He also noted that the Strike Steering 
Committee had endorsed the report of the Student Senate Executive 
Committee re the Princeton Plan. 

Professor Korson expressed the belief that "if the Faculty 
Senate had had the information presented today by the Chancellor it 
would have voted differently on the Princeton Plan." 

Trustee Abrams requested that the record show that the 
committee had spent considerable time in discussion of his motion 
(not carried) that: "There be a moratorium on required papers and 



1 



COMMITTEE 



m 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

examinations at UM/Amherst for a period of one week prior to Election 
Day. " 

At the suggestion of Chairman Troy, and on the motion of 
Trustee Elters, it was moved, seconded and 

VOTED ; To table the Proposed Change in Calendar UM/Amherst 

1970-71 (Princeton Plan) pending consideration of this 
matter at the August meeting of the full Board of 
Trustees. 

Chairman Troy requested that all material pertinent to this 
issue be distributed by the Office of the Secretary to all members of 
the Board for their evaluation and review. (This material is 
attached to these minutes.) 

The Chairman will present a summary of the Committee's 
deliberations on this matter and all relevant discussion and debate 
at the full Board meeting of August 10, 1970. 

Re Grievance Petition, Mrs. Aino Jarvesoo, UM/Amherst ; The 
Committee reviewed the case and the opinion submitted by University 
Counsel Broadhurst (Document T70-132). 

After discussion, it was moved, seconded and 

VOTED ; To recommend to the Board of Trustees that the position 
of the University Administration, UM/Amherst, be sus- 
tained in the matter of the grievance petition of Mrs. 
Aino Jarvesoo. 



R^ CLcigv^nrp PpHH 



Committee reviewed the 

Counsel Broadhurst (Document T71-007). 



nn Walter T , TjOrmann 3 TTM/ttosfrin '■■'• The 

case and the opinion submitted by University 



After discussion, it was moved, seconded and 

VOTED ; To recommend to the Board of Trustees that the position 
of the University Administration, UM/Boston, be sus- 
tained in the matter of the grievance petition of 
Walter J. Lehmann. 

Dean Gagnon announced the nomination of Dr. Robert Hoopes 
of the Boston faculty, and formerly Chairman of the English Depart- 
ment, University of Michigan, as the new Dean of Faculty, UM/Boston. 

After discussion, it was moved, seconded and 

VOTED ; To recommend to the Board of Trustees that they approve 
the appointment of Robert G. Hoopes as Dean of Faculty, 
University of Massachusetts/Boston, effective Septem- 
ber 1, 1970. 






F & EP 
7-9-70 



Jarvesoo Case-- 
UM/Amherst 



Lehmann Case- 
UM/Boston 



Robert Hoopes— 
Dean of Faculty, 
UM/Boston 



3574 



F & EP 
7-9-70 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

The meeting was adjourned at 3:10 p.m. 





Robert J(. McCartney 
Secretary, Board of Trusted 




COMMITTEE 



i 



] 



3575 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON 
FINANCE 

July 27, 1970, 10:00 a.m., Room 118, Parker House, Boston 

PRESENT: Committee Members and Trustee Staff : 

For President Wood: Mr. Phillips; Chairman Pumphret; 
Trustees Elters, Frechette, Gordon; Treasurer Johnson, 
Secretary McCartney 

Administrators, Faculty, Staff, and Invited Guests : 
From TIM/A" : Chancellor Tippo; Deans Allen, Field, 
Gentile; Assistant Dean and Coordinator of Student 
Affairs Scanlon; Professor Ludtke; Messrs. Brand, 
DeMers, Littlefield, Ryan; David Yelton, President 
Graduate Student Senate; Richard Verrochi, Student 
Senate Treasurer; Members of the following student 
groups: UM/A: CAF — George Child, Kenneth Mosakowski, 
Richard Ragin, Stephen Nazzaro, Ernest Reis, Paul 
Sheinkopf, Paul Spiegel; DRUM — Robyn Chandler; 
Married Student Housing Committee — Susan Roundy; 
Senate Budget Committee — Kevin Kulakowski 

From UM/B : Vice -Chancellor Hamilton; Mrs. Ann Evans, 
Student Activities Council 

The meeting was convened by Chairman Pumphret at 10:00 a.m. 

Student Activities Tax, UM/Amherst , was the first matter 
taken up by the committee with Chancellor Tippo* s memorandum of 
July 20, 1970, to President Wood being the basis of much of the dis- 
cussion on this issue (Document T71-018). The Chancellor summarized 
his memorandum, in which he states that the Student Senate Budget 
Act, which was due in his office by May 1 but not received until 
June 5>> raises several important questions of legality, tax-exempt 
status, and historical intent and authorization of these funds. It 
would also, he said, force all undergraduate students to pay a tax 
which includes expenditures for social action programs, some of which 
are to off-campus individuals, groups, and organizations. Addition- 
ally, there is the possibility that the proposed $7.00 increase might 
be considered excessive for a single year. 

Trustee Elters expressed disagreement with the position 
taken by Chancellor Tippo. He argued that "the type of expenditure 
objected to by the Chancellor does not go beyond the limits set by 
3hapter 75 of the Statutes." He also requested that "the Board of 
Trustees not attempt to by-pass the Student Senate, as the Budget Act 
las been submitted by students through their representative govern- 
nent. " 

Trustee Pumphret raised the recurring issue of student 
representation. The question raised is whether the sentiment of the 
ntire student body is being represented in the Student Senate or 



Finance 
7-27-70 



Student 

Activities Tax- 
UM/Amherst 



3576 



Finance 
7-27-70 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

merely the sentiment of the leadership of the Student Senate? 
Trustee Elters replied that Senate actions reflect both. Mr. Elters 
also pointed out that many special interest student activities, 
which are noncontroversial, and are now supported by student activi- 
ties funds would probably not pass a referendum test. 

Chairman Pumphret also questioned the effectiveness of 
social programs which axe student initiated rather than being under 
University or community sponsorship. He suggested the possibility 
that state funds might be acquired for social programs if the wider 
approach of University of community involvement were adopted. 

Chancellor Tippo reviewed a memorandum from Counsel Broad- 
hurst to Treasurer Johnson dated May 29, 1968, regarding the doubtful 
legality of some aspects of imposing a student activities tax. He 
also read a letter from President Lederle to last year's Student 
Senate President Bruce Balboni noting the lateness of that budget 
report and emphasizing the fact that any action to increase the stu- 
dent tax should be taken prior to the April l£, 1970, deadline. The 
Chancellor suggested that the University should consider the question 
of withdrawing entirely from the collection of student taxes. He 
cited the example of Yale University which uses a system of sending 
to each parent (with the tuition and fee bill) a check list of sup- 
plemental activities for which contribution is on a selective and 
voluntary basis. 

Trustee Frechette suggested that an opinion should be 
sought immediately on the matter of the student tax, particularly as 
it relates to contributions .from student tax funds to social action 
programs, and to the authority of the Board of Trustees in imposing 
this tax. There was general agreement with this position. 

Trustee Elters observed that if a ruling by the Attorney 
General went against the University's right to levy a mandatory stu- 
dent tax, the Student Senate would undertake: the voluntary tax 
approach. However, he pointed out, the tax structure would still 
have to be presented as a "package," and stressed that he has 
detected no objection by students to the tax formula as a whole. In 
his opinion, the portion of taxes allocated to social action pro- 
grams would pass on a student referendum. 

Dean Field stated that he was against transferring student 
tax funds to outside organizations but supported the student activi- 
ties budget in general. It was, he said, a time-consuming but worth- 
while educational experience for students. He noted that the Student 
Senate had inaugurated some very worthwhile programs (the Belchertown 
School Program, for instance) in the social action area. 

Trustee Gordon stressed that the Trustees are not objecting 
to the substantial worthiness of the social action programs per se; 
but the dollar amounts "put us on new ground" and raise the question 
of the legal right of the Board to act in this area. 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Professor Ludtke observed that all student tax funds are 
levied to finance and support student involvement in one way or 
another. Dispute arises, he said, when the body raising the fund 
loses control by appropriations to outside groups. 

Chancellor Tippo noted that it was necessary to proceed in 
July with billing of students, and that bills now being sent to 
parents would show the full amount of the student tax as recommended 
by the Student Senate: $3*50 increase for the first semester. Two 
dollars of the increase, however, will be held in escrow until the 
tax issue is resolved. Also, a freeze on expenditures will be 
placed on: (a) Social Action Programs (especially those off-campus); 
(b) gifts and donations to off -campus persons or groups; and (c) 
political activities which might be questionable because of Internal 
Revenue Service regulations. The Chancellor also suggested that a 
student referendum be held in the fall on the $7.00 tax increase 
proposed by the Student Senate. 

Treasurer Johnson noted that the nature of the organization 
being supported by student tax funds is of key importance; it must 
be, he said, a Recognized Student Organization. Many "donations" 
approved by the Student Senate, Mr. Johnson noted, have not been to 
RSO organizations. 

Trustee Elters said that he would hope for an opinion from 
the Attorney General by the first week in August. He also stated 
that if a negative opinion was received he would personally take the 
matter to The National Student Association attorneys for a court test 

Chairman Pumphret agreed that a prompt resolution of the 
issue was important. 

After further discussion, it was moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that the program 
be endorsed in principle and that the University Admin- 
istration, UM/Amherst, with the cooperation of the Stu- 
dent Senate, frame a question or questions on the 
legality of the Student Tax, and the authority of the 
Board of Trustees in this matter to be submitted to the 
Office of the Attorney General for a formal legal 
opinion. 

Treasurer Johnson next reviewed the Audit Report , 
UM/Amherst. 



3571 



■** 



Finance 
7-27-70 



Question was raised on discounting procedures under the 
"Innovations Film Fund" account. Dean Dwight Allen, School of Educa- 
tion, pointed out that this procedure was normal in the industry 
under quantity purchase procedures. Treasurer Johnson asserted that 
a new brochure to be issued will state plainly: "Discounts may be 
arranged on quantity purchase of films." 



Audit Report- 
UM/Amherst 
Treasurer' s 
Analysis 



3578 



Finance 
7-27-70 



COMMITTEE 



North Village 
Rent Schedules, 
UM/Amherst 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

With reference to an Orientation Retreat for School of 
Education staff members. Dean Allen pointed out that a very large 
percentage of School of Education staff and faculty were new to the 
University and the Retreat served the useful purpose of planning the 
first year 1 s ; program free of distraction and interruption. 

On other matters related to travel, the Dean said that some 
procedural errors and delays had occurred, particularly in the filing 
of travel vouchers. Trustee Frechette suggested that the University 
policy regarding travel authorization be amended to cover the fact 
that some travel by University personnel is of an emergency nature, 
without time to follow the usual filing procedures. 

With reference to the Audit Report comments on the "Top of 
the Campus," Treasurer Johnson noted that the entire administrative 
procedure will be coming to the Board of Trustees for review and 
action. 

Chairman Pumphret once again commented on the fact that in 
an operation involving the annual turnover of millions of dollars, 
the comments of the state auditor were generally of a superficial 
nature. He extended compliments to the Treasurer. 

North Village Rent Schedules , UM/Amherst, were reviewed by 
Mr. Littlefield. He presented schedules based on the estimated costs 
for North Village Apartments of $ll|0.00 per single bedroom unit, and 
$l60.00 per two-bedroom unit. Individual reduction of $Iu5>0 per 
month per apartment could be made based on a $13,000 utility cost, 
including estimated cost for laundry operation which would not be 
incurred until laundry facilities were completed. 

Graduate Student Senate President Yelton then presented the 
Graduate Senate rent proposal. There was considerable discussion by 
the committee, and others present, comparing the estimates of Mr. 
Yelton and Mr. Littlefield. 

Chairman Pumphret pointed out that as this was the first 
Married Student Housing Project with which the Building Authority had 
been associated, it would be imperative that the project be entirely 
self -liquidating, including adequate accruals for renovations. He 
stressed that facilities in the project would be first class. He 
also indicated that actual costs of operating and actual costs of 
debt service were yet to be determined and that appropriate adjust- 
ments to the rental schedule would be considered when actual cost 
experience is obtained. 

It was agreed that the Married Student Housing rent sched- 
ule would be reviewed with the Married Student Housing Committee 
after the first three months of operation at which time firm operat- 
ing cost figures could be determined. Meanwhile, it was agreed to 
recommend to the Trustees a reduction of $5>.00/month in the rent 
schedule as originally proposed. 



r 



1 



L 



1 



COMMITTEE 



I 



i 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Chairman Pumphret added that such review could be made on 
an annual basis. He stressed that the project is a nonprofit venture 

It was then moved, seconded and 

TOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that a rent sched- 
ule for North Village Married Student Housing be estab- 
lished as follows: 

$135.00 per month - single bedroom apartment 
$155.00 per month - two bedroom apartment 

It was also 

VOTED: To recommend to the Board of Trustees that the estimated 
costs used to set these rental rates be compared with 
actual operating costs (with the Married Student Housing 
Committee participating in the review) after three month 
occupancy of the 2h0 apartments for purposes of recom- 
mending new rental schedules based on actual cost expe- 
rience and appropriate renovation accruals. 

Changes in the Graduate and Foreign Student Loan Fund , 
UM/Amherst , approved by the Board on _Aprii^l32^12iitj were presented 
by Associate Treasurer Brand. He noted that the "Graduate Senate had 
approved an appropriation of an additional $1,000 to be added to this 
fund, providing certain conditions are met (Document T71-016). It is 
proposed that the University match donations of the Graduate Student 
Senate to this fund. Chancellor Tippo stated that the matter of the 
University matching these funds should be renegotiated each year, and 
would be subject to availability of funds. Condition (3) of the 
document is to be deleted. 

After further discussion, it was moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that the Graduate 
and Foreign Student Loan Fund be changed to provide that 
loans are to be limited to $300 with repayment due three 
months from the date of the promissory note. An exten- 
sion of one month may be granted under certain circum- 
stances at the recommendation of the Graduate Dean or 
the Foreign Student Advisor. In no case, however, may a 
loan be made less than thirty days prior to the known 
termination of studies. 

Establishment of Rates for Self -Supporting Trust Fund 
Operations , UM/Amherst, was reviewed by Associate Treasurer Brand. 
Occasionally, Mr. Brand said, the administration is asked to estab- 
lish trust funds that involve the creation of a rate for self-support 
ing trust funds operations. The Treasurer asks that he be granted 
such authority (Document T71-017). 

After discussion, it was moved, seconded and 



3579 



Finance 
7-27-70 



(V\A; 



\\ , )<&* 



Changes — 
Graduate and 
Foreign Student 
Loan Fund, 
UM/Amherst 



Rates—Self- 
Supporting 
Trust Funds, 
UM/Amherst 



3580 



Finance 
7-27-70 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that the 

Treasurer of the University, with approval of the 
appropriate Chancellor, be authorized to establish 
rates for the sale of items produced by unsponsored 
research activities whereby the income will be returned 
to the trust fund operation. 

Trustee Gordon, commenting informally and for information 
purposes only as Chairman of the Committee on Government and Univer- 
sity Relations, advised that a breakfast meeting of his committee 
will be held prior to the August meeting of the full Board, and that 
the committee will request agreement in principle regarding initial 
funding of a proposed Institute for Governmental Services. This 
action will be necessary in. August, Trustee Gordon said, in order to 
meet the September deadline for submission of budgets for the next 
fiscal year. 

The meeting was adjourned at 2:00 p.m. 




Robert 
Secretary, 





McCartney 
3oard of Trufsji 



I 



I 



COMMITTEE 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

July 29, 1970, 12 Noon, Parlor B, Statler-Hilton Hotel, Boston 

PRESENT: Committee Members and Trustee Staff : 

Chairman Healey, President Wood; Trustees Gordon, Haigis, 
Pumphret, Troy; Treasurer Johnson, Secretary McCartney 

Administrators, Faculty, Staff, and Invited Guests : 

UM System Office : Mr. Cass; Mr. Frank Phillips, Consultant 

From UM/Amherst: Chancellor Tippo; Messrs. Clay and 

Marcus 
From UM/Boston : Chancellor Broderick, Vice Chancellor 

Hamilton, Dean Gagnon, Planning Officer 

' Brien 



1:00 p.m. 



The meeting was called to order by Chairman Healey at 



3581 



Executive 
7-29-70 



Mr. Healey welcomed Dr. Wood to this, the first meeting of 
a Trustee committee since he took office as President on July 1, 
1970. 

The President stated that the System Office will continue 
to be located at 66 Church Street, Cambridge, until some time in 
September. By then, relocation somewhere close to the Government 
Center is anticipated. A single further move is projected for the 
future — possibly within a year. 

The President introduced Mr. Frank Phillips, formerly of 
NASA, who is currently acting as a consultant on organization and 
development of the System Office. Both the President and Mr. Phil- 
lips have been meeting with the Chancellors, Dean Soutter, and other 
Deans on all campuses to discuss organizational matters. This pro- 
cedure will continue in the weeks ahead. 

Commenting on agenda item one — Major Items — 1972 Operating 



Budget , the President said he was requesting each campus to highlight 
their priority items in the Operating Budget request for 1972. The 
System Office will give major attention to priority status on the 
Amherst campus for Graduate education. A positive presentation will 
set apart these requirements from undergraduate items. Emphasis 
will be given to the high quality and capacity of the University at 
Amherst to conduct a full-fledged graduate program. There will be a 
shift from the "we need to catch up" theme. Recommended will be 
growth of 1^00 students on the Amherst campus and 500 at Boston. The 
Worcester campus is expected to double its enrollment. Emphasis will 
be placed on the support services problem at Amherst, and the space 
and budget problems at UM/Boston. 

Trustee Troy queried whether Dr. Wood was satisfied that 
the graduate enrollment at Amherst would constitute approximately 
one-third of the total enrollment. The President responded 



1972 Operating 
Budget 



3582 



Executive 
7-29-70 



COMMITTEE 



UM/Amherst-- 

Reorganization 

Plan 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

affirmatively on the basis of his initial assumption, adding that 
some requests from the campuses will be subject to further review in 
the fall. Chairman Healey said that a year will be required to 
review the UM/Amherst situation in terms of ultimate goals and 
directions for the campus. The President added that such review 
will take place on "more than sheer quantitative grounds." 

Funds will be requested for the establishment of a Munici- 
pal Services Institute. This agency will attempt to draw upon 
services at all levels of the University and be responsive, initially 
to the needs of local governments, and — later on-- to those of the 
Commonwealth. The President added that he was not inclined to press 
for establishment of a Law School in the 1972 budget request. 
Further study is required and will be followed by a major effort on 
this item when priorities are finally settled. It was pointed out 
that the Trustees will require a clear "pro and con" report on the 
proposed Law School. 

Continuing his report, President Wood stated that he and 
Dean Soutter will meet in Washington on Friday with HEW Secretary 
Elliot Richardson to explore funding problems for the Medical School 
At the same time, he is working with Chancellor Broderick and Vice 
Chancellor Hamilton to uncover ways in which the System Office can 
assist in expediting the permanent campus project for UM/Boston at 
Columbia Point. 

Additionally, the President is moving experimentally to 
develop suggestions and information on how the System Office should 
evolve. Full participation of all persons involved will be solic- 
ited. He hopes for the establishment of "working groups" to crys- 
tallize recommendations so that a report may be presented to the 
Board of Trustees in September. 

Discussion turned to agenda item two — UM/Amherst, Reorgani - 
zation Plan . The President stated that the plan is both timely and 
desirable, and he approves of it. However, it will be necessary to 
initiate System Office involvement in the areas of fiscal affairs anc. 
development as soon as possible. There is no problem with the 
Amherst campus plan's outline with regard to fiscal affairs; but, the 
System Office will need a counterpart to Treasurer Johnson. 

The President reported that Albert Bush-Brown, Vice Presi- 
dent, University of Buffalo, will also be retained as a consultant 
on a part-time basis to work on System Office development. Addi- 
tionally, the President will meet with Attorney Broadhurst next week 
to analyze how certain matters may be brought before the Board of 
Trustees. He noted that the communication between the Chancellors 
and himself had been excellent. 

Chancellor Tippo was invited to comment on the UM/Amherst 
Reorganization Plan. The Chancellor reported that the Amherst campus 
expects an enrollment of 20,000 students this fall, with 1300 faculty 
members and a total staff of 3,000 persons. The annual budget is 



1M1TTEE 



3583 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

nearly $80,000,000. It is essential that he free himself of every- 
day minor details so that he will be available to focus on major cam- 
pus problems. The Chancellor brought out some of the details in the 
Proposal for Administrative Reorganization (Document T71-019) dated 
April 2k, 1970. Essentially, this calls for improving administration 
by dividing responsibility to allow greater delegation of authority 
and the systematizing and extension of mechanisms for participation 
of the faculty, students and staff in the decision-making process. 
As a principal point, the reorganization calls for five areas to 
report directly to the Chancellor, each headed by a Principal Admin- 
istrative Officer (PA0). The areas are: Academic Affairs, Student 
Affairs, Development, Support Operations, and Finance. 

For the present, Chancellor Tippo stated that he was oper> 
ating with persons in an acting administrative capacity. These 
include Associate Provost Gluckstern in academic affairs and Dr. 
Bromery in student affairs. It is proposed that Associate Dean Marcu£ 
School of Engineering, be appointed as Special Assistant to the Chan- 
cellor for Public Affairs. The search for a head for the Support 
Services area will need to be initiated. Search Committees for per- 
nanent nominees for the five PA0 posts will be appointed in September 
Meanwhile, the Chancellor requested approval in principle of the 
Reorganization Plan so that it might move to the Board of Trustees at 
the meeting of August 10, 1970. 

Reference was made to the proposed Governance Plan at 
[JM/Boston. Chancellor Broderick commented that he hoped for a second 
meeting with the Executive Committee to resolve differences on the 
specifics of the plan among students, faculty and administration. 
The divisions of opinion, he said, are "small but intense." 

After further brief discussion, it was moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that it approve in 
principle the Proposal for Administrative Reorganization 
UM/Amherst, as detailed in Document T71-019, and spe- 
cifically the establishment of Five Principal Administra- 
tive Officers to report to the Chancellor. 

Chancellor Tippo next queried itfhether the Board of Trustees 
should consider an increase in the out-of-state tuition rate from 
600 to $1,000. A current bill in the legislature (presently in 
Senate Ways and Means) calls for out-of-state students to pay the 
'full cost" of education which would take this matter up until the 
Trustees meet on the 1972 Operations Budget request in September. 

It was agreed that Mr. Cass would present a full-scale 
eport on the legislative session after prorogation; also that the 
University should oppose the so-called provisions of the bill which 
provide for full cost of instruction for out-of-state students. 

Brief reference was made to the question of whether or not 
an effort should be made to obtain maintenance and operating funds 
from the legislature for the residence halls. Trustee Pumphret 



Executive 
7-29-70 



Out of State 
Tuition Increase 



3584 



Executive 
7-29-70 



COMMITTEE 

Methane Gas- 
Columbia Point- 
UM/Boston 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

suggested that the University, if this step is taken, should specify 
the personnel units where "relief" would be required, such as jani- 
tors, maintenance help, utility people, etc. 

There was also brief discussion on the recent press notice 
concerning the presence of methane gas at Columbia Point. It was 
pointed out that the Trustees have not had other sites under con- 
sideration, also, that the Boston College High School has for years 
functioned effectively on basically the same site conditions. The 
President called upon Chancellor Broderick who invited Vice Chancel- 
lor Hamilton to comment on the current work stoppage at Columbia 
Point. A memorandum was distributed to the meeting tracing the par- 
ticulars of this event, which led to a halt in filling of the lagoon 
Discussions have been held between the UM/Boston administrative 
staff, a representative of the System Office and representatives of 
the Columbia Point Community Group. In substance, the Community 
Group requested an agreement under which the University would post- 
pone further filling of the lagoon until Friday, July 31, 1970. 
Vice Chancellor Hamilton consented to this agreement with the under- 
standing that the Community and the University discuss plans and 
ideas involving the land north of the sewer easement line no later 
than Friday, July 31 • 

With respect to the community relations problems at the 
UM/Boston site, the Vice Chancellor outlined possibilities which 
appeared to him to be open to the University. These included: 

1. Negotiation 

2. Dealing with further possible confrontations by: 

a. Attempting to keep the trucks moving, or stopping the 
trucks until the obstructors leave. 

b. Taking trespass action. 

c. Pursuing a civil injunction and obtaining a court order 
to restrain Columbia Point residents from interfering 
with progress at the project site. 

UM/Boston Planning Officer O'Brien suggested a fourth pos- 
sibility: stop work entirely. This is, in fact, now the case, and 
the cost of suspension this week will amount to approximately 
$25,000. 

The committee called into question whether the present 
group causing the obstruction is truly representative of the Colum- 
bia Point community. 

Mr. O'Brien further suggested that, if any of the alterna- 
tives proposed above failed to work, then some new technique will 
have to be devised to handle the excavated material. President Wood 
suggested that he, Chancellor Broderick and Vice Chancellor Hamilton 
discuss this matter at an early date. Treasurer Johnson proposed, 
if negotiations failed, that the problem might be relayed back to 
the BBC for handling, since the basic contract is with the BBC and 
they might very well be the agency to initiate legal action. 



COMMITTEE 



] 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



President Wood requested Chairman Pumphret to comment on 
the Finance Committee ' s review of the Student Activities Fee issue at 
last Monday's meeting. 

Mr. Pumphret commented that, in his opinion, the meeting 
"came off poorly." The "off-campus issue" was not adequately focused 
upon, he said. Instead the main thrust of discussion concerned 
legality of the Trustee role in imposing the Student Activities Tax. 
The Finance Committee has voted, however, to request an opinion of 
the Attorney General on the above matter. Chairman Healey observed 
that all opinions requested from the Attorney General must now be 
routed through the Board of Higher Education. 

Chairman Healey requested Treasurer Johnson to describe 
procedures in billing for the Student Activities Tax. Response was 
that, in the past, the Student Activities budget has been approved by 
the President which permits the tax to be applied to billings. The 
money so collected is held in the Office of the Treasurer. Authority 
for expenditures comes from the RSO office. In recent years, how- 
ever, the RSO office has merely approved whatever the Student Senate 
has voted. When an invoice comes to the Treasurer's Office it is 
scrutinized for legality and conformance to procedures. The problem, 
Treasurer Johnson concluded, is that "the students — once the Presi- 
dent has approved the budget, feel free to juggle it." 

Chancellor Tippo reminded the Committee that the collection 
of the tax with a $3*00 increase has been permitted for the fall 
semester, but that $2.00 of this amount will be held in escrow. He 
added that the "line will be held" on four areas: 

1. The political area 

2. Donations to off -campus organizations and individuals 

3. Area governments (No budgets had been submitted from this 
source.) 

U. Social action programs, especially those off campus 

The Chancellor asked for the support of the Trustees in 
this decision. Chairman Healey stressed that the role of the Trus- 
tees should be confined to policy matters, and that, once a particu- 
lar student activities budget has been approved for "X, Y and Z," 
then expenditures must conform to the approved policy framework; but 
this becomes an administrative matter for enforcement. 

President Wood cautioned against seeking an opinion from 
the Attorney General's Office at this time, as several months might 
elapse before obtaining a response. With regard to such matters at 
UM/Boston, Vice Chancellor Hamilton said that review is being given 
to the Brandeis Plan whereby Student Activities are supported on a 
completely voluntary basis with a private, nonprofit student corpora- 
tion as the vehicle. Chancellor Tippo added that a similar, but not 
identical, procedure is followed at Yale. Consideration, he said, 
should be given to applying a similar plan at the University of 
Massachusetts. Further, the Chancellor favors having the proposed 
$7.00 increase for the coming year placed on a student referendum. 



3585 



Executive 
7-29-70 



Finance 

Committee 

Report 



Student 

Activities Tax, 
UM/Amherst 



3586 



Executive 
7-29-70 



COMMITTEE 



Campus Center 



Medical School 
Progress Report 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Treasurer Johnson reminded the Trustees that they could assess fees 
for any activities recommended as part of University functions; also 
that the student budget document in question reflects RSO proposals. 
Hox\rever, the Student Senate decides which organizations are recog- 
nized and which are not. The question, he said, is whether or not 
the Board of Trustees has delegated the power to determine which 
groups are recognized organizations. If so, should the Board go one 
step further and reclaim this prerogative? 

Chancellor Tippo added that the Student Activities Budget 
was to have been submitted by April 1, 1970, and was not, in fact, 
received until June 5, 1970. 

Under agenda item four, Other Business , Trustee Pumphret 
commented briefly on the need for rules and regulations for the dis- 
pensing of alcoholic beverages in the Murray D. Lincoln Campus Center 
including the "Top of the Campus." Treasurer Johnson stated that 
such rules will be presented to the September meeting of the Board. 
Meanwhile, the Campus Center will not sell alcoholic beverages until 
the Board of Trustees has fully approved the rules and regulations. 

Dean Soutter presented a progress report on the University 
Medical School. The Shaw Building, he said, is far behind schedule 
due to delays imposed by the contractor. Nevertheless, the intent is 
to move ahead and open the academic program in September. 

The Medical Science Building is more than $6 million above 
estimated cost, but the Senate has placed $9«2 million in the capital 
budget to cover this item and overages on the site work. 

Funds for the University Hospital are in the Capital Outlay 
Bill, but without provision for escalation. However, there is a $1$ 
million capital outlay item to cover general escalation of capital 
projects of which $5 million is earmarked for the hospital. 

Concerning appropriation of federal matching funds, the 
Department of Health, Manpower at HEW has not yet decided whether to 
grant $16 million or whether this sum should come from the Hill- 
Burton Fund. This matter is expected to be resolved when President 
Wood and Dean Soutter confer on Friday with HEW Secretary Richardson. 
Hopefully, the Secretary will be sympathetic, and a federal review 
can follow. The Dean noted that the Boston office of HEW has been 
extremely cooperative in expediting all matters related to Medical 
School construction. 

Because of delays on the Shaw Building, Dean Soutter said, 
the Commissioner of Administration has advised BBC to select an out- 
side engineering firm to supervise future phases of Medical School 
construction. 

On next Monday (August 3) the Medical School will receive 
its second accreditation visit. The last team of visitors complained 
about the lack of a single professor of medicine. We still have 
none. However, the Dean reported, we do have a psychiatrist, a 



I 



i 



1 



COMMITTEE 



1 



1 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

pediatrician, and a professor of medicine. 

The Dean is requesting the staff attorney (Worcester) to 
put all staff agreements into legal form so that they can be brought 
to the Board of Trustees. 

In conclusion, Chancellor Tippo advised the Board informal] y 
that discussion will take place at the Trustee meeting on August 10 
concerning the "Princeton Plan." He reported that no state university 
with the exception of Rutgers has adopted it. He outlined the numer- 
ous problems which would be encountered if the plan were to be 
adopted. Chief among these is that this planned period is not com- 
pensated for by noncurricular time. There is also question about 
the number of students who would use the period for the intended 
purpose. 

Chancellor Hamilton reminded the Trustees that a problem 
exists concerning the $80 million capital outlay appropriation for 
UM/Boston, in that the language of the bill "makes construction 
impossible." 

The meeting was adjourned at 3:0£ p.m. 





Robert J. McCartney" 
Secretary, Bokrd of Trustees 




358? 



Executive 
7-29-70 



Princeton 
Plan 



3588 



COMMITTEE 



Institute on 
Governmental 
Service — 
UM/Amherst 

Doc. T71-020 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON GOVERNMENT AND 
UNIVERSITY RELATIONS 

August 10, 1970, 8:30 a.m., Room 1101, Murray D. Lincoln Campus Cen- 
ter, UM/Amherst 

PRESENT : Committee Members and Trustee Staff : 

Chairman Gordon, President Wood; Trustees Croce, Troy; 
Treasurer Johnson, Secretary McCartney 

Administrators, Faculty, Staff, and Invited Guests : 

From UM/Amherst : Chancellor Tippo; Assistant Dean Gugin; 
Bradford Whipple, Graduate Student Senate 

From UM/Boston : Vice Chancellor Hamilton; George Goodwin, 
Faculty Senate; Andrew Warren, Student Senate 

From System Office : Mr. Phillips, Consultant to the 
President; Mr. Cass 

Chairman Gordon called the meeting to order at 9:00 a.m. 

The Chairman stated that the main item of business was con- 
sideration of a proposal to establish an Institute of Governmental 
Service. This item has been under consideration by a special sub- 
committee of the Trustee Committee on Government and University Rela 
tions which has held ten to twelve meetings on the subject since 
last fall. The Committee feels, Mr. Gordon said, that much more 
needed to be done by the University as a state institution operating 
within the Land-Grant concept to shift action on services to con- 
sideration of urban problems. The present proposal embodies the 
concept of a problem -solving institute available to help the 35>1 
cities and towns in Massachusetts as well as the government of the 
C ommonwe al th . 

Mr. Gordon emphasized again that the committee had dis- 
tinguished from the beginning between the concept of a problem- 
solving institute and that of a governmental institute devoted to 
study and research. 

Although the investigative work leading to the present 
proposal got underway prior to the advent of President Wood, the 
President has attended the last three meetings of the subcommittee 
and contributed valuable advice and suggestions. 

Chairman Gordon expressed the hope that the committee 
would now agree to recommend the proposal in principle to the Board 
of Trustees later today, and also recommend the budgetary provisions 
so that they may be included in the operating budget request for 
1972 which will be presented to the Board in September. 

Trustee Troy expressed approval of the plan's concept to 
avoid drawing on so-called "extra time" of the faculty. He raised 
a question, however, on how deeply political figures might become 



I 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

involved in the Institute; also, the question of the proposed Insti- 
tute's priority over such items as the proposed law school. 

Chairman Gordon responded that the subcommittee felt that 
a few "experienced and respected" political figures would need to be 
a part of the Institute. Their services would be helpful in obtain- 
ing the required rapport with cities and towns. It was indicated 
that the question of priorities on proposed projects would need to be 
considered by President Wood and the System Office. 

In response to a question from Trustee Croce concerning how 
such institutes functioned in other universities, Vice Chancellor 
Hamilton responded that- -to his knowledge — only two in the United 
States are operated on the approach outlined in the current document: 
Wisconsin and Illinois. Both have large Extension Services and a 
sizable part of activity is devoted to services for municipal govern- 
ments. President Wood responded that he sees the Institute as 
thriving by meeting the needs of local, elected officials who have 
enormous burdens of interpretation of information and other activity. 
An advisory agency is needed, the President said, and it has to be 
problem-solving. His second point was that the proposed Institute 
should involve a whole series of academic disciplines. 

President Wood said that the question of priorities was a 
difficult one. However, he has been impressed by (a) the long, 
diligent work of the subcommittee in developing this proposal ; (b) 
the fact that the order of magnitude of the budget commitment is not 
likely to grow; and (c) that the kind of commitment proposed requires 
basic preparatory work in depth, which work has, indeed, been done by 
this committee. Institutes of Governmental Service have an honorable 
tradition, he concluded. 

Further discussion ensued in which Chairman Gordon pointed 
out that the requested budget figure of approximately $180,000 is a 
relatively small amount considering what can be achieved among the 
cities and towns in the Commonwealth; Trustee Troy called for the 
Institute to be "utterly separated" from the Cooperative Extension 
Service in Agriculture; and it was also pointed out that the success 
ful operation of the proposed Institute might assist the University 
to obtain a law school. Trustee Croce called for a mechanism for the 
channeling of services. Chairman Gordon observed that the proposal, 
at the moment, is an internal document which will be studied further, 
Dut cannot be placed in limbo for another year. 

Mr. Gordon emphasized that the Institute would be charging 
certain fees; however, its operation is conceived as being nonprofit. 
Elates will not be scaled to those of outside commercial or consulting 
firms. Also, there is hope of getting private foundation support for 
the enterprise. Resources of all campuses will be drawn upon, and 
the reporting line will be directly to the System Office. 

It was agreed that the participation of students should not 
De overstressed. Due to conflicts in the calendar, etc., Professor 
}oodwin stated that the staff of the center ought to be completely 
separate from faculty and students. 



3589 



Gov. & Univ. Rel. 
8-10-70 



3590 



Gov. & Univ. Rel. 
8-10-70 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

President Wood observed that internships would be involved 
and that the Institute should make itself available to city and town 
officials who would come in and tell about their problems. At a 
different level, the Institute will undoubtedly be called upon to 
deal with major issues affecting cities and towns, and this phase 
will require attention by the best minds available. The influence 
of the director at this point will be paramount in deciding how such 
problems should be handled. 

Trustee Croce stated emphatically that the proposed Insti- 
tute should stand apart from and completely leave out consideration 
of health problems. He noted that, under Chapter 798, cities and 
towns have available the services of the Comprehensive Health Orga- 
nization, and all such problems should take that route. Discussion 
followed on the definition of a health problem, and it was agreed by 
Chairman Gordon that the workload accepted by the Institute would 
need to proceed through three steps: (l) identification of the 
problem^ (2) determination of whether the Institute can helps an - < ^ 
(3) decision on whether the Institute wishes to become involved. It 
is impossible, the Chairman said, to know at this time just how all 
of this will work out. 

President Wood cited the Institute of Local Government at 
Chapel Hill (University of North Carolina) which has played a major 
role in that state similar to the one now proposed for Massachusetts 
The Chapel Hill Institute stayed out of politics, ideological 
issues, etc., in pursuing its mission. 

Treasurer Johnson queried to what extent the Institute 
would perform a coordinating role among the various institutes and 
centers which presently exist on the campus, such as Water Resources 
Research Center, the Commonwealth Technical Resource Service, etc. 
President Wood responded that the Institute would very likely become 
a clearing house. Chairman Gordon indicated that it was difficult 
to provide a final, rigid format at this stage. Flexibility should 
be maintained so that the Institute can respond appropriately in the 
future. 

Trustee Croce observed that the Institute could act ass a 
stimulus. For example, if the town of Grafton has a water pollution 
problem, this should go through the Regional Planning Committee. 
The Institute for Municipal Services would then notify the RPC that 
the problem will be studied. 

Treasurer Johnson noted that the Bureau of Government 
Research was established with a similar concept in mindj however, it 
had to back off because it did not have the authority to command the 
services of the various academic departments. 

After brief, further discussion it was moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that the proposal 
for establishment of an Institute for Governmental 
Service as detailed in Document T71-020 be approved in 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

principle, and that the budget request for said Insti- 
tute as detailed on pages 7 and 8 of Document T71-020 
be incorporated into the University's operating budget 
request for 1972 as a special appropriations request. 

President Wood stated that his office will work out an 
appropriate formulation in the 1972 Budget Request. 

Mr. Cass provided a brief resume of the current state of 
the supplementary budget request and other legislation of interest 
to the University. (The request includes $229,000 of UM/Amherst and 
$100,000 for the establishment of the President's Office.) 

Mr. Cass expressed doubts concerning restoration of funds 
for the disadvantaged student programs which have been in conference 
committee. He said he was not certain that the Out-of -State Student 
Bill will go through to enactment. 

On another subject, it was noted by Chairman Gordon that 
the federal support level at the University is up this year despite 
a generally shrinking federal support picture. Treasurer Johnson 
responded that this is a function of our growth and of the addition 
of distinguished faculty. Chancellor Tippo cited an outstanding 
example in the ability of Dean Dwight Allen of the School of Educa- 
tion to obtain federal funds. Treasurer Johnson stated that federal 
funding rose by $2,000,000 in the past fiscal year over the prior 
year, and that he was optimistic about this coming year. 

Chairman Gordon noted that it was not too early to con- 
sider the establishment of a Washington, D.C., office to coordinate 
the area of federal funding. 

President Wood reported that he and Dean Soutter had 
visited Washington last week to seek support for the Teaching Hos- 
pital request at the Medical School and to endeavor to remove cer- 
tain language from the present appropriations act. 

The meeting was adjourned at 9 m .$0 a.m. 




Robert J 
Secreta 



Cartney 
Board of Trus 




3591 



Gov. & Univ. Rel. 
8-10-70 



Supplementary 
Budget Request 



Disadvantaged 

Student Programs 



Federal Support 



Teaching Hospital, 
Medical School, 
UM/Wbrcester 



3592 



COMMITTEE 



Name Change -- 
Department of 
Industrial 
Engineering to 
Industrial 
Engineering and 
Operations 
Research, 
UM/Amherst 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON FACULTY AND 

EDUCATIONAL POLICY 

September h, 1970, 11:00 a.m., Room l6k, Parker House, Boston 

PRESENT: Committee Members and Trustee Staff : 

Chairman Troy; Trustees Elters, Lyons, Maginnis; Secretary 
McCartney, Mrs. Hull 

Administrators, Faculty, Staff, and Invited Guests : 

From System Office : Mr. Phillips, Consultant to the 
President 

From UM/Amherst : Chancellor Tippo; Associate Provost 
Gluckstern; Faculty Senate Representative Roberts ; 
Assistant Dean Buck; Professors Clayton, Jones, Trueswell; 
Professor Burroughs for the Tenure and Grievance Committee 
Professor Ulin 

From UM/Boston : Chancellor Broderick, Dean Hoopes 

From UM/Wbrcester : Dean Soutter 

Chairman Troy convened the meeting at 11:05> a.m. 

The first item discussed was the Change in Title of the 
Department of Industrial Engineering, UM/Amherst . The department 
requests a name change to Department of Industrial Engineering and 
Operations Research (Document T71-02l|. ). 

Department Chairman Trueswell reviewed the proposal and 
answered questions from the committee. He termed the work of the 
department essentially a team approach of many directions. The new 
title will more clearly reflect the department's current and planned 
academic and research interests. 

It was pointed out that there is much multidepartment work 
being done in related fields; also, there is no objection to the 
proposed title from any other university department. The title as 
proposed is In use at other universities, such as Cornell, NYU, and 
Johns Hopkins. 

After further discussion, it was moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that the title of 
the Department of Industrial Engineering, UM/Amherst, 
be changed to the Department of Industrial Engineering 
and Operations Research. 

Change in Title of the Department of Agricultural Engi - 
neering, UM/Amherst , was discussed by Assistant Dean Buck of the 
College of Agriculture (Document T71-025 ). It is requested that the 
title be changed to the Department of Food and Agricultural Engi- 
neering. 



COMMITTEE 



J 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Dean Buck pointed out the recognized leadership of the 
UM/Amherst program in the field of Food Technology. The proposed 
name change will more accurately describe the department's program, 
and will provide identification for the unique aspects of this pro- 
gram, differing as it does from more traditional Agricultural 
Engineering programs. Few, if any, other universities, Dean Buck 
said, offer a rigorous program in which food production, manufactur- 
ing, preservation, and distribution of food are studied in terms of 
modern engineering concepts and analytical biology. A few other 
universities are now actively attempting to gain additional compe- 
tence in this area. 

After discussion, it was moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that the title of 
the Department of Agricultural Engineering be changed 
to the Department of Food and Agricultural Engineering. 

Dean Soutter next discussed Titles of Medical School 
Faculty . These, he said, must meet the specialized requirements of 
the Medical School. Originally, he had requested the addition of 
three titles ; also, that the title "clinical" or "research" be added 
to that of the regular academic title to indicate the principal 
occupation of nonfull-time faculty. This request is no longer 
necessary, he said, as both of these titles have been in use on the 
Amherst campus and, hence, are established. 

Chancellor Tippo pointed out that the title "Research Pro- 
fessor" had not been in use on the Amherst campus for some time. 
The title will not be in use at all at Amherst when the few tenured 
persons now holding it have retired. 

The Dean said he would like to add a position between 
Instructor and Assistant Professor, similar to that at a number of 
other medical schools, called "Associate." This is generally given 
to men with long experience who warrant a title above Instructor, 
but whose academic achievements fail to qualify them for professorial 
rank. It also provides a position to which an Instructor who has 
worked hard can be promoted if he lacks the attainments which would 
justify making him an Assistant Professor. This title would be 
reserved for voluntary and part-time faculty. 

After discussion, it was agreed to refer this matter to 
the President for review and consideration. 



3593 



F & EP 



Name Change — Dept. 
of Agricultural 
Engineering to 
Food and Agricul- 
tural Engineering, 
UM/Amherst 



Titles of Medical 
School Faculty, 
UM/Wbrc ester 



It was moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that the appoint- 
ment of Federico Welsch as Associate Research Professor 
of Biochemistry, UM/Wbrc ester, be approved. 



Appointment — 
Federico Welsch, 
Associate Research 
Professor of Bio- 
chemistry, 
UM/Worc ester 



3594 



F & EP 
9-U-70 



COMMITTEE 



Personnel Actions 
UM/Boston 



Amendments — 
Faculty Senate 
Constitution, 
UM/Amherst 



Tenure and 
Grievance 
Proposal, 
UM/Amherst 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Reviewing Personnel Actions, UM/Boston, Chancellor Broder- 
ick noted that several nons tat e -funded faculty appointments are now 
being processed, and will be ready for presentation to the full 
Board at its September meeting. These appointments are of varying 
levels, the Chancellor said, and are all being supported by a Ford 
Foundation Grant in relation to the Black Studies program. 

The committee's permission was granted to Chancellor 
Broderick to present these nonstate -funded appointments directly to 
the Board on September lh» A personnel supplement will be prepared. 

Tenure and Grievance Proposal, UM/Amherst, was next pre- 
sented for discussion. Professor Phillips Jones, Chairman of the 
Faculty Senate Rules Subcommittee on Tenure and Grievance, presented 
the special report of the committee, and answered questions regarding 
the proposal (Document T71-022 ). 

This set of amendments to the Constitution of the Faculty 
Senate, UM/Amherst, was approved by that body on May 28, 1970 (Docu- 
ment T71-023 ). They are intended to implement the recommendations 
of the Rules Committee on Tenure and Grievance. The objective is to 
enhance the effectiveness of the Tenure and Grievance procedure, to 
establish a University Tenure and Grievance Committee which shall 
serve as an examining board for the hearing of cases pertaining to 
tenure and dismissal, serve as a grievance panel for the hearing of 
grievances of faculty members and formulate and review campus -wide 
personnel policies and procedures. In addition, the amendments pro- 
vide definitions of grievances and incorporate recommendations for 
the establishment of personnel policy committees and grievance com- 
mittees for each school, college, or faculty. It is expected that 
these changes will improve personnel policies and procedures. It is 
further hoped that these new procedures, in the future, will facili- 
tate resolution of potential grievances at a lower level, thus 
improving faculty morale. The need for codification of personnel 
procedures was stressed by Professor Jones. 

Chairman Troy observed that the proposed changes "would 
seem to provide more conciliatory than judicial weight. " The 
strength of the committee, he felt, was most important in terms of 
its effectiveness. 

Chancellor Broderick expressed concern over the implica- 
tions of the proposal for UM/Boston, particularly Item (6), page jj>, 
of the Motions passed by the Faculty Senate (Sen. Doc. 70-061jA, Doc- 
ument T71-023 )« This type of case "would not be the exception, but 
the norm," the Chancellor said. He could foresee a danger that a 
prima facie case could be based on filing of evidence, and that 
these cases could in many instances go to a full hearing. "The bur- 
den of proof of violations of academic freedom would be shifted to 
the administration, " he said, and the Board "may be regularizing in 
advance what appears already to be a trend in personnel cases." He 
stressed that he was not expressing views for or against the pro- 
posal as presented, but that the Trustees were establishing a policy 
the consequences of which should be carefully weighed." 



COMMITTEE 



El 



J 



3595 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Chancellor Broderick also noted the reference to the 
"Provost" rather than to the President or the Board of Trustees 
(pp. 7 and 8) as being a change from past policies. He further 
noted that President Wood was not at the meeting and that he should 
have a voice in this decision. 

Concern over the wording of various other sections of the 
document were expressed by other members of the committee and by 
the Secretary <> 

Chancellor Tippo stated that "this is a good report" and 
that he strongly supported it. However, he made two exceptions to 
the wording on page 8 of Section II (Document T71-023): (l) the 
reference to "primary responsibility" should be "joint responsibility 
and (2) the wording "rare instances" is too vague. In view of the 
objections raised, however, he noted that it would only be necessary 
at this time to approve the first motion of the Faculty Senate docu- 
ment. The rest of the document can be implemented administratively. 

Mr. Phillips observed that it was incumbent on the Board 
to consider the implications of all decisions in terms of effect on 
individual campuses. 

It was agreed that recommendation would be made to the 
full Board of Trustees to approve at this time only Motion I of 
Faculty Senate Document 70-061jA (Document T71-023 ). Specifically 
changed will be all references to "University-wide" in the document; 
"UM/Amherst campus" or "UM/Amherst campuswide" will be substituted. 

After further discussion, it was moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that the Consti- 
tution of the Faculty Senate, UM/Amherst, be amended as 
follows (words in parentheses are to be deleted, while 
those underlined are to be added): 

8. (k) There shall be a UM/Amherst Tenure and Grievance: 
Committee 

(1) To serve as an Examining Board for the 
hearing of cases pertaining to tenure and 
dismissal, and 

•» 

(2) To (seek the settlement of other) serve as 
a Grievance Panel for the hearing of 
grievances of faculty members, and 

(3) To formulate and review UM/Amherst campus - 
wide Personnel Policies and Procedures . 

Concerning cases of tenure and dismissal, the committee 
shall be governed by the "Procedure for Faculty Action 
on Tenure and Dismissal" dated February 27, 1961;, and 



F & EP 
9-^-70 



KQtt 



F & EP 
9-U-70 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

any subsequent amendments to this procedure duly 
adopted. Concerning (other) grievance cases the com- 
mittee shall (hear the grievance and seek to negotiate 
its appropriate remedy) be governed by the "Procedure 
for Processing Grievance Cases" dated April 16, 1.910, 
and any subsequent amendments to this procedure duly 
adopted. 

The membership of the committee shall be one faculty 
member on tenure from each School or College except 
there shall be one from each Faculty of the College of 
Arts and Sciences o If a School or College does not 
have a faculty member on tenure, the Rules Committee 
shall provide for the pro tern representative. The 
(elected senators ) faculty from each School or College 
or Faculty shall elect the member to serve on this com- 
mittee ', the Rules Committee shall oversee these elec- 
tions . 

Terms of membership shall be as stipulated in the By- 
Laws, except that the term of a member serving as a 
member of an Examining Board or a Grievance Panel con- 
vened to consider a tenure and dismissal or grievance 
case shall continue until such consideration has been 
completed. The chairman of this committee shall be 
elected annually by the membership of the committee. 

For any given case the committee shall appoint two addi 
tional faculty members on tenure from the School or 
College or Faculty of the faculty member whose tenure 
or grievance is under consideration. 

The committee shall formulate UM/Amherst campuswide 
Personnel Policies and Procedures and shall review 
existing policies and procedures at the request of the 
Board of Trustees, Chancellor, Provost, Deans' Council, 
Faculty Senate, or any School Personnel Policy Commit- 
tee . After appropriate consultation with the Chancel- 
lor and/or Provost, and Deans' Council, such policies 
and procedures shall be submitted to the Faculty Senate 
for approval] the Administration shall transmit such 
policies and procedures to the Board of Trustees for 
review and final approval when appropriate . UM/Amherst 
campuswide policy and procedures shall supersede any 
IM/Amherst school policy found in conflict with it . 



The meeting was adjourned at 12:1)5 p.m. 




Robert J 
Secretary, Bo" 



1 



COMMITTEE 



J 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

September 9, 1970, 1:30 p.m., Room I6I4, Parker House, Boston 

PRESENT : Committee Members and Trustee Staff : 

Chairman Healey, President Wood; Trustees Gordon, Pumphret. 
Rowland, Troy; Treasurer Johnson, Secretary McCartney, 
Mrs. Hull 

Administrators, Faculty, Staff, and Invited Guests : 

From System Office : Mr. Phillips, Mr. Harman 

From UM/Amherst : Chancellor Tippo; Associate Provost 
Gluckstern; Messrs. Clay, Cruff, DeNyse, Egan, Hogan, 
Grinnan, Littlefield, Myers 

From UM/Boston : Chancellor Broderick, Vice Chancellor 
Hamilton; Dean Hoopes; Professors Broderick, Brown, Good- 
win, Knight; Mr. Warren for the Student Council 

From UM/Worcester : Mr. Stockwell 

The meeting was convened by Chairman Healey at 1:L|5 p.m. 

Transfer of University and Lincoln Apartments to Univer- 
sity and Establishment of Rent Rates, UM/Amherst, was the first item 
considered by the committee. Mr. Littlefield reviewed the rental 
schedules for Married Student Housing, UM/Amherst, other than 
facilities owned by the UMass Building Authority. These schedules, 
he said, reflect the first of two necessary increases. The first 
increase, now being recommended, will place the facilities on a 
self -liquidating basis through the remainder of 1971. The second 
increase (September 1, 1971) will be deferred to grant more thorough 
review of actual costs of operating and development of accruals for 
renovations and replacement of appliances. 

Three different schedules are now being proposed, all 
effective November 1, 1970. These have been carefully reviewed with 
and are agreeable to, the Married Student Housing Committee which 
recognizes the necessity for these units to be self -liquidating. 

After discussion, it was moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that the existing 
"Residence Hall Trust Fund" established for traditional 
dormitories be and hereby is accepted as the account of 
record with a subsection to be established for the 
operation of Married Student Housing at the University 
of Massachusetts, Amherst, other than facilities owned 
by the University of Massachusetts Building Authority, 
and that the Treasurer be and he hereby is designated 
to receive and disburse income derived from such opera- 
tion. 



QK 



59? 



Transfer of 
University and 
Lincoln Apart- 
ments to Univer- 
sity and Estab- 
lishment of Rent 
Rates 



3598 



Executive 
9-9-70 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

It was also 

VOTED : To recommend, to the Board of Trustees that the revenues 
derived from Married Student Housing, including income 
from garage rentals, at the University of Massachusetts, 
Amherst, other than facilities owned by the University 
of Massachusetts Building Authority, shall be applied 
as follows : 

1. So much of the revenue as shall be required to meet 
the rental payable therefor by the Commonwealth 
shall be remitted to the Treasurer and Receiver- 
General of the Commonwealth for the General Fund. 

2. The balance shall be applied to the cost of operat- 
ing and maintaining the Married Student Housing 
facilities and garages, including reimbursement to 
the Treasurer and Receiver-General of the Common- 
wealth for expenditures, if any, from state appro- 
priated funds in each fiscal year. 

It was further 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that, within 

available funds, every effort be made to keep all apart- 
ments and garages in as good condition as possible but 
that no major renovations or replacement of appliances 
shall be undertaken until reserves have been establishec. 
to fund same. 

It was also 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that the follow- 
ing be and hereby is established as the schedule of 
charges to be in effect November 1, 1970, for occupancy 
by faculty and staff of Married Student Housing apart- 
ments, other than facilities of the University of Massa- 
chusetts Building Authority, at the University of Massa' 
chusetts, Amherst, namely: 



University Apartments 

Studio 

One-bedroom Efficiency 

One Bedroom 

Two -bedroom Efficiency 

Two Bedrooms 

Three Bedrooms 

Lincoln Apartments 

Studio 

One Bedroom 

Two Bedrooms 



Monthly Rental 



$ 



$ 



75.00 

93.75 

100.00 

106.25 

112.50 
131.25 



75.00 

93.75 
112.50 



COMMITTEE 



m 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

The above charges include the cost of utilities (e.g., 
heat, electricity, water and sewer taxes). 

It was further 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that the follow- 
ing be and hereby is "established as the schedule of 
charges to be in effect commencing November 1, 1970, 
for students occupying Married Student Housing on that 
date, other than facilities of the University of Massa- 
chusetts Building Authority, at the University of 
Massachusetts, Amherst, namely: 



Monthly Rental 



University Apartments 

Studio 

One-bedroom Efficiency 

One Bedroom 

Two-bedroom Efficiency 

Two Bedrooms 

Three Bedrooms 

Lincoln Apartments 

Studio 

One Bedroom 

Two Bedrooms 



The above charges include the cost of utilities (e.{ 
heat, electricity, water and sewer tax). 

It was also 



VOTED ; To recommend to the Board of Trustees that the follow- 
ing be and hereby is established as the schedule of 
charges to be in effect for students moving into Mar- 
ried Student Housing on and after November 2, 1970, 
other than facilities of the University of Massachu- 
setts Building Authority, at the University of Massa- 
chusetts, Amherst, namely: 



$ 


69.00 




85. 


00 




90. 


00 




95. 


00 




100. 


00 




115. 


00 


$ 


69. 


00 




85. 


00 




100. 


00 



•3 



University Apartments 

Studio 

One-bedroom Efficiency 

One Bedroom 

Two-bedroom Efficiency 

Two Bedrooms 

Three Bedrooms 

Lincoln Apartments 

Studio 

One Bedroom 

Two Bedrooms 



Monthly Rental 



$ 



72.00 
90.00 

95.oo 

100.00 

105.00 

120.00 



72.00 
90.00 

105.00 



3599 



Executive 
9-9-70 



3600 



Executive 
9-9-70 



COMMITTEE 



Campus Center 

Proposal, 

UM/Amherst 



Top of the Campus 
Inc. -- Legal 
Status 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

The above charges include the cost of utilities (e.g., 
heat, electricity, water and sewer taxes). 

The Campus Center Proposal, UM/Amherst, was next discussed 
Mr. Warren Grinnan, Manager of the Center, reviewed details of the 
proposal, copies of which had been previously circulated to members 
of the Board. Mr. Grinnan discussed in detail the Report on Regula- 
tions and Procedures for Alcoholic Beverages Service in the Campus 
Center (Document T71-028 ) and the proposed Top of the Campus, Inc., 
By-laws (Document T71-027 ). 

Color coding used in the architectural drawings of the 
Campus Center clearly designates the specific areas in the building 
to be (a) occasionally used for service of alcoholic beverages; (b) 
dining rooms to be used for service of alcoholic beverages during 
dining hours; and (c) lounge and bar areas for the service, storage, 
and mixing of alcoholic beverages during the normal operating hours, 
as duly licensed. 

In response to questions from committee members, Mr. Myers 
stated that the Top of the Campus, Inc., is the legal entity neces- 
sary to allow for the purchase of alcoholic beverages at wholesale 
prices; also, that the necessary funds to begin operation would be 
supplied from sale of club memberships. 

Trustee Pumphret expressed a continuing concern over 
implications of the Campus Center operation for the local business 
community, and the legal responsibility for the entire operation, 
particularly the Rathskeller. Mr. Grinnan and the Top of the Cam- 
pus, Inc., assume all legal responsibility for the operation, and 
details of the Rathskeller operation are to be presented later to 
the Trustees for their ^approval. Treasurer Johnson provided assur- 
ances that the operation should benefit the local economy in that 
the facility is expected to attract large groups of conferees, etc., 
to the area which will add to rather than detract from the transient 
trade of local inns and motels. 

Considerable discussion followed on other aspects of the 
Campus Center operation, including provisions for careful checking 
of ID cards, training of food service personnel in the service of 
alcoholic beverages, and the special emphasis and controls which 
will be used in the areas where beverages are being mixed. 

After further discussion, it was moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that it authorize 
Top of the Campus, Inc., to service the Murray D. 
Lincoln Campus Center as set forth in the bylaws of 
Top of the Campus, Inc., said bylaws being set forth in 
Document No. T71-027, a copy of which is on file with 
the Office of the Secretary of the Board of Trustees; 
further, to authorize the operation of Top of the Cam- 
pus, Inc., in accordance with the following rules and 
regulations : 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

1. Top of the Campus, Inc., will comply with the rules 
and regulations set forth in a document entitled 
"Report on Regulations and Procedures for Alcoholic 
Beverages Service in the Campus Center Submitted to 
the Board of Trustees of the University of Massachu- 
setts by Warren T. Grinnan, Campus Center Manager, 
August 3, 1970," a copy of which instrument is on 
file with the Office of the Secretary of the Board 
of Trustees and is designated as Document No. 
T71-028. 

2. Any misconduct on the part of students while they 
are participating in activities of Top of the Cam- 
pus, Inc., is to be reported by the corporation to 
the Dean of Students. Any similar misconduct on the 
part of staff or other employees of the University 
is to be reported by the corporation to the appro- 
priate Principal Administrative Officer. Such 
reporting by Top of the Campus, Inc., is to be 
exclusive of any disciplinary action taken by the 
corporation toward its club members. 

3. The price of alcoholic beverages is to be set by 
Directors of Top of the Campus, Inc. 

k* Alcoholic beverages will not be sold anywhere other 
than in. those areas in the Murray D. Lincoln Campus 
Center indicated on the application for a license to 
sell alcoholic beverages dated December 9, 1969, and 
submitted to the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. 

5. No "Rathskeller" operation shall be undertaken for 
the sale of wine, beer, or other alcoholic beverages 
as licensed by the Alocholic Beverages Control Com- 
mission, without specific vote of authorization by 
the Board of Trustees of the University,, 



3601 



Executive 
9-9-70 



The 1972 Operating Budget Request 



Amherst Campus_ jJ _ Boston 



Campus, Medical School, Field Stations (Document T71-029 ) was next 



5 s 



discussed 

President Wood circulated a memorandum just completed by 
his office, date of September 8, 1970, regarding the combined bud- 
gets. General observations appear in the covering memorandum. Spe- 
cific recommendations are made on some budget items requested by the 
individual campuses. Chancellors and Deans are requested to provide 
further information on specific items listed in an attachment to the 
President's memorandum. 

In addition to reviewing details of his memorandum, the 
President noted details of the staffing proposal for the System 
Dffice. He also stressed the need for comparative figures from other 
university systems and stressed that a preliminary analysis pointed 
to almost unparalleled growth for the University of Massachusetts 
system, comparable to the largest of the other state systems such as 



Operating 
Budget Request, 
FY 1972 



System Office 



3602 



Executive 
9-9-70 



COMMITTEE 



University 

Governance, 

UM/Boston 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

California, Michigan, and New York. The University, in other words, 
faces a major system-wide management problem. 

President Wood, accompanied by Chairman Healey, will pre- 
sent the budget to the Legislature. Mr. Healey noted that it was 
important to reemphasize the fact that the System Office will not be 
a "super-organization, " or another operating arm of the University. 
Many of the System Office positions will, in fact, be positions 
already authorized for individual campuses. The Chairman also 
pointed out the proposed Institute of Governmental Services, while 
reporting to the President's Office, must be considered as a spearate 
item from the President's Office for budgetary purposes. 

Chancellor Tippo noted that, while he wished to be as 
cooperative as possible, the Amherst campus had received only 3 to 8 
professional positions per year in each of the past five years, half 
of which positions were heads of residence, so that the Amherst cam- 
pus, in his opinion, was not in a position to provide staff posts to 
the System Office. 

Further meetings with the President and Chancellors will be: 
held on the budget. Chairman Healey stated the assumption that the 
FT 1972 Operating Budget Request will be approved by the Board when 
figures are complete. He expressed his approval of the budget as 
outlined by the President. 

It was then moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To accept the recommendations of President Wood with 

reference to the University's Operating Budget request 
for FY 1972 (Document T71-029 ) as detailed in the 
President's memorandum entitled "Budget Requests," 
dated September 8, 1970, and to recommend to the Board 
of Trustees that the Budget Request, and recommendations 
(subject to continuing review and refinement between 
. the President and the Chancellors) be considered and 
acted upon at the meeting of September ll;, 1970. 

Considered also were the budgets for the System Office and 
the Institute for Governmental Services. It was agreed that these 
budgets would be presented to the Trustees on September lh by Presi- 
dent Wood. 

University Governance, UM/Boston, was presented by Profes- 
sor Thomas Brown, Chairman of. the "History Department and Chairman of 
the Committee which had drawn up the document ( T70-061 ). 

President Wood stated that he had reviewed the document 
and had found it an appropriate means of involvement of the various 
sections of the University community of UM/Boston. He added that it 
was in line with general developments at educational institutions in 
the country. He noted the advantages of a single constituent 
assembly to represent faculty, students, and administration while 
maintaining the key roles of the President, the Chancellor, and the 
Board of Trustees. 



COMMITTEE 



3603 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

On the two main issues being debated in the document, 
President Wood said he considered the \\0% student ratio as being 
acceptable, but marginal. As to the method of electing departmental 
chairmen, the President said he considered this debatable, but not 
JG>ut of the mainstream of developments in University education nation 
wide. He noted what "appeared to be an excessive preoccupation with 
constitution of departments, " which would tend to make the depart- 
ment the polity, or governing body. The President said he regarded 
departments as being concerned primarily with recruitment of faculty 
education of students, and separated by disciplines rather than by 
some concept of legality or authority. He agreed with the concept 
of a University community but was "not sure that there are communi- 
ties of biologists and physicists in this sense." 

Professor Brown reviewed the history of the proposal 
through its approval by the UE/Boston Faculty Senate, and its subse- 
quent defeat by vote of the student body by the narrow margin of 16 
votes (less than the required two-thirds majority). Mr. Andrew 
Warren, President of the Student Council, has, since initial presen- 
tation of the proposal to the Trustees last spring, presented a let- 
ter to the Board which notes a substantial shift in student opinion 
in favor of the proposal. The Student Council has now voted unani- 
mously (with one abstention) to present the proposal to the Board of 
Trustees for approval. 

Professor George Goodwin, leader of the "loyal opposition" 
on this issue at UM/Boston, noted several points of objection, par- 
ticularly the fact that "the Dean is mentioned only once" in the 
proposal. "It is terribly important," he said, "that the Dean be 
written in — that he participate in decision-making." This, Profes- 
sor Goodwin said, would build in a great deal of consultation and 
result in "a slightly different tip of the scales." 

Considerable discussion developed over various other 
points in the proposal. Professor Brown stated that he was not in a 
position to make specific changes suggested, but agreed that com- 
ments from the President and the Trustees would be accepted for con- 
sideration. 

As it was necessary for Chairman Healey to leave the meet- 
ing for another appointment, President Wood assumed the chair. 

After further discussion of the UM/Boston Governance Pro- 
posal, it was moved, seconded and 

VOTED ; To recommend to the Board of Trustees that the UM/Bos- 
ton Governance Proposal be approved in principle pend- 
ing possible changes of wording based on comments to be 
received from the President and the Trustees „ 

Trustees Pumphret and Rowland are recorded as abstaining. 

Chancellor Tippo requested that it be made a matter of 
record that the intent of the above vote applies strictly to the 



Executive 
9-9-70 



3604 



Executive 
9-9-70 



Student Fees, 
Campus Center, 
UM/Amherst 

COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

University at Boston and not to the Amherst campus. 

Treasurer Johnson presented for approval suggested votes 
relating to Student Fees for the Campus Center, UM/Amherst . 

After discussion, it was moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that the schedule 
of rates, fees, rentals, and other charges for the use 
of accommodations in and goods and services provided in 
the project undertaken by University of Massachusetts 
Building Authority pursuant to amended request made 
June 28., 1968, by authority of the Trustees of the Uni- 
versity of Massachusetts approved by the Board of 
Trustees, be and hereby is amended by striking out the 
portion thereof relating to "Student Use Fee" and 
inserting in its place the following: 

Student Use Fee 

$21;. 00 and $19.00 as the respective fees, on a semes- 
ter basis, be paid by undergraduate and graduate stu- 
dents at the University of Massachusetts in Amherst 
and Hadley for use of the campus center included in 
the Eleventh Project of the Authority, provided that 
so much of said fees as shall equal in the aggregate 
$60,000 per semester shall constitute the fees for 
use of the student union building incorporated in 
said Project and the remaining portion of said fee 
shall constitute fees for the use of the campus cen- 
ter building incorporated in said Project; 

and that as so amended said vote be and the same hereby 
is in all respects approved, confirmed, and ratified. 

It was also 

VOTED ; To recommend to the Board of Trustees that the schedule 
of rates, fees, rentals, and other charges for the use 
of accommodations in and goods and services provided in 
the project undertaken by University of Massachusetts 
Building Authority pursuant to amended request made 
June 28, 1968, by authority of the Trustees of the Uni- 
versity of Massachusetts established by vote of the 
Authority, May 28, 1970, be and hereby is amended by 
striking out the portion thereof relating to "Student 
Use Fee" and inserting in its place the following: 

Student Use Fee 

$21;, 00 and $19.00 as the respective fees, on a semes- 
ter basis, be paid by undergraduate and graduate stu- 
dents at the University of Massachusetts in Amherst 
and Hadley for use of the campus center included in 



I 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

the Eleventh Project of the Authority, provided that 
so much of said fees as shall equal in the aggregate 
$60,000 per semester shall constitute the fees for 
use of the student union building incorporated in 
said Project and the remaining portion of said fee 
shall constitute fees for the use of the campus cen- 
ter building incorporated in said Project; 

and that as so amended said vote be and the same hereby 
is in all respects approved, confirmed, and ratified. 

Chancellor Tippo reported that the Commonwealth has author 
ized a rate of 100 per mile for official travel, and that it is now 
necessary for the Board of Trustees to make a similar authorization 
for University employees. 

It was moved, seconded and 

VOTED: To recommend to the Board of Trustees that the mileage 
allowance for University employees operating their own 
motor vehicles in the performance of official duties be 
raised from eight to ten cents per mile, and that such 
change in rate be retroactive to August 31* 1970. 

Discussion on the UM/Boston Lagoon issue was deferred by 
President Wood until a future meeting. 

It was then moved, seconded and 

VOTED ; To go into executive session for the purpose of dis- 
cussing an important personnel matter. 



and 



J 



After a brief executive session, it was moved, seconded 

VOTED : To come out of executive session for the purpose of 
adjournment. 

The meeting was adjourned at 3:5>0 p.m. 




Robert J'. /McCarthy 
Secretary, Uroard of TruE 



3605 



Executive 
9-9-70 



Travel Rate, 
100 Mile 



3606 



COMMITTEE 



Proposed Agree- 
ment, UM/Boston 
and Columbia 
Point Action 
Coalition 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS 

September 10, 1970, 10:30 a.m., Exeter Room, Hotel Lenox, Boston 

PRESENT : Committee Members and Trustee Staff : 

Chairman Haigis; Trustees Knowles, Maginnis, Pumphret; 
Treasurer Johnson, Secretary McCartney 

Administrators, Faculty, Staff, and Invited Guests : 

From System Office : Messrs. Phillips and Bush -Brown, 
Consultants to the President 

From UM/Boston : Chancellor Broderick, Vice Chancellor 
Hamilton, Planning Officer O'Brien, Mr. Prince 

From UM/Boston Project Office : Messrs. McAdams and 
Kusack of the BBC 

Representatives of Architectural Firms and Other Con- 
sultants : 

Dean Belluschi; Messrs. Sasaki and Alexander of Sasaki, 
Dawson, DeMay Associates; Messrs. Cantrell and Rabin of 
MBM; Mr. Lizeck of Harry Reese Associates; Mr. Clancy of 
Goody and Clancy; Mr. Wallace of Geometries, Inc. 

Chairman Haigis called the committee to order at 10:lj.O am. 

The Chairman commented that Item 1 on the original agenda 
resulted from direct confrontation between residents of Gorman House 
the Secretary, and himself as Chairman, and was being referred back 
to Gorman House for further administrative clearance prior to 
Trustee consideration, if any. 

The first item considered was Report on Lagoon Situation — 
Columbia Point, UM/Boston . This item was carried over from the 
Executive Committee meeting of the previous day (Document T71-030 )* 

Vice Chancellor Hamilton referred to the proposed Agree- 
ment between the University of Massachusetts and the Columbia Point 
Action Coalition which had been distributed to the Executive Commit- 
tee the previous day. Additional copies were circulated. 

Dr. Hamilton reminded the Trustees that a demonstration at 
the Columbia Point site by residents of the nearby housing project 
had interrupted excavation and filling of the lagoon; that a second 
demonstration had taken place, and that negotiations to work out an 
agreement had proceeded over a period of approximately three weeks, 
resulting in the present proposal. Mr. Hamilton continued that he 
had pledged his word that he would seek to secure Board of Trustee 
approval of this agreement as a working principle for the future 
between the University and the Columbia Point community. 

A highlight of the proposal, Dr. Hamilton said, was joint 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

planning and joint use of land north of the sewer easement where the 
lagoon is presently located, so that this area would be developed on 
the basis of certain facilities and buildings which the Coalition 
desires to erect and others which the University sought to construct 
Further, the document lists specific developments including: a new 
lagoon, a suitable bathing area, a marina for small boating, a 
marina for larger commercial or quasi -commercial boating; a restau- 
rant; a tot-lot, a health center, cooperative stores, and a multi- 
service building. These, the Vice Chancellor said, are facilities 
which the Coalition would like to have constructed; however, the 
proposal as written does not commit the University in any way. He 
himself called for the construction of playing fields for touch 
football, softball, a baseball diamond, etc., and proposed joint use 
with the residents at Columbia Point. He also felt strongly that 
the Trustees should consider construction of a joint health center. 
He emphasized that it would not be possible to contruct playing 
fields on the main site. 

Trustee Pumphret expressed grave concern that the members 
of the Columbia Point Coalition do not appear to realize that the 
UM/Boston campus under construction at Columbia Point is a facility 
for the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, intended to serve principally 
residents of all communities in the eastern part of the state. He 
pointed out that the residents at Columbia Point have excellent 
bathing facilities a short distance from the housing project; also, 
considering the large number of splinter groups in the housing unit, 
there is a real question as to who may properly and legally best 
represent the inhabitants who reside there. Dr. Hamilton agrees 
that this is a problem; even that it was recognized by the members 
of the Coalition. 

The Vice Chancellor stressed that the University and the 
Columbia Point neighborhood would have to reside together side-by- 
side for all the future. Therefore, it is necessary to work out 
some kind of arrangement whereby the proximity of both entities 
could be mutually advantageous. He stressed again particularly the 
desirability of developing a joint health center. 

Trustee Pumphret noted that endorsement of the proposed 
agreement would represent a repudiation of the Sasaki Master Plan; 
however, Dr. Hamilton stated that reference to the "Sasaki Plan" on 
page 2 of the document did not refer to the overall Master Plan for 
the site. Rather, it was a plan drawn up at the Vice Chancellor's 
request over the weekend, and pertained strictly to the area under 
discussion and the possibility of planning a park at that location. 

Chancellor Broderick recommended that the Trustees accept 
the report, acknowledging that the specific facilities outlined are 
the goals of the Coalition, but without in any way lending endorse- 
ment of these goals by the Board of Trustees. 

Trustee Pumphret disagreed. He felt that any vote of 
approval for the agreement would, imply to the Coalition, as well as 
to the general public, an endorsement of the basic aims and 



360? 



B & G 
9-10-70 



3608 



B & G 
9-10-70 



COMMITTEE 



Budget and 

Schedule, 

UM/Boston 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

objectives as set forth by the Columbia Point Action group. 

Extensive discussion followed in which elaboration of the 
basic issues as defined heretofore was made by Chairman Haigis, 
Trustees Knowles and Maginnis, and by Consultants Phillips and Bush- 
Brown. 

Trustee Pumphret summed up his basic objection by observ- 
ing that, in the eyes of the Columbia Point Action Coalition, the 
campus project is a neighborhood school; whereas, in the eyes of the 
Board of Trustees and the Commonwealth, the facility is intended to 
serve all of eastern Massachusetts. The problem is, he said, "how 
to drive this home to them, " adding "as we expand we can foresee 
25>,000 students there — we need to think in terms of this." 

Consultant Phillips observed that we should recognize that 
we must get along with the Columbia Point residents over the long 
run, reserving to ourselves whatever rights we deem appropriate. 

The committee commended Vice Chancellor Hamilton for the 
splendid, job he had done in an arduous role in conducting negotia- 
tions over the past several weeks. 

In summary, it was the consensus of the members of the 
committee that they endorse a process of continuing discussion and 
consultation with the Columbia Point Action Coalition, recognizing 
the vital importance of exchanging ideas and information between 
UM/Boston planning officials and all groups officially representing 
contiguous neighborhood interests, so that the mutual advantage of 
the University and such groups may be served as the campus at 
Columbia Point develops now and in the future, remanding for future 
consideration the specific details in a proposed agreement between 
the University and the Columbia Point Action Coalition as set forth 
in Document T71-030 . 

At the invitation of Chairman Haigis, Planning Officer 
O'Brien introduced the next item, Budget and Schedule, UM/Boston . 

Mr. O'Brien said the problem on schedule and budget 
derives from the fact that the Legislature appropriated $80,000,000 
to get the campus underway and then called for a report on methane 
gas. He reminded the Trustees that the original schedule approved 
by them called for completing the buildings in the summer of 1972, 
equipping them, and getting the education program underway in the 
fall term of 1972. The work, he said, has progressed with "aston- 
ishing rapidity." Within one year from appropriations, we have 
received approvals on the working drawings for one building, and 
will be coming in with others in the near future. However, the 
request for methane investigation will take at the longest approxi- 
mately three months. 

The legislation calls for a report to be filed with the 
Ways and Means Committee with respect to the methane gas problem 
fifteen days before construction starts. Since the present 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

timetable on this is uncertain, and the legislation does not make 
clear who will review the matter and grant approvals , it is likely 
that the present timetable for September 1972 will have to be 
altered. The question then becomes: Is it possible to make the 
move from Arlington Street to Columbia Point between the first and 
the second terms? This may be possible, but will probably require 
some adjustment in the academic calendar. 

In response to query from Trustee Pumphret, Mr. O'Brien 
indicated that some work continues, particularly in the design area. 
The foundations for the library building have been advertised and 
awarded, but no letter issued so that work can begin. Advertising 
for foundation bids for the other buildings was ready to go. Mr. 
Kusack of BBC summarized that we have a 1.2 million dollar contract 
on which bids have been received, and notice of award given, but 
the contract has not been signed and no work can proceed. 

Uncertainty was expressed as to how the Legislature would 
react when it receives the report, and what procedures might ensue 
from that point on. 

Mr. Phillips raised the question of what is the charge 
given to the consultants preparing the methane report? Mr. Kusack 
responded that the report is expected (l) to evaluate the problem, 
(2) to reevaluate the present solution, and (3) to propose a solu- 
tion, i 

Mr. Phillips argued that it is extremely important that 
the charge to the consultants be properly phrased; otherwise, the 
University may find itself faced with a counterproposal. 

Extensive further discussion ensued. It was agreed that 
the Trustees and the Project Office should adhere to the original 
timetable for 1972. However, Mr. McAdams pointed out that, after 
the Legislature receives the report — if it is not acceptable—the 
question becomes, ,r Where do we go from here?" Certain structures 
could be built; but the science building will require 2.5 years for 
completion. 

Mr. O'Brien next turned to discussion of the budget for 
the project. Emphasis was placed on the effect of reduction from 
lj?0 to 130 million dollars. 

The bureau and the Project Office have come up with a 
budget which is in the area of 136 to 138 million dollars. While 
some disagreements may develop item by item, Mr. O'Brien said, it 
is apparent that this budget can be met. 

Basically, the budget covers a capital outlay program 
totaling $150,000,000. The reductions are in the following items: 

Land acquisition 

Deletion of design for College Three 
Substitution of a bus station for the proposed 
transit link 



3609 



B & G 
9-10-70 



3610 



B & G 
9-10-70 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

The gross effect of this is to reduce the budget by $16,000,000. 

The reason for the first reduction is that we have not 
acquired all the land we intended to, particularly the pumping sta- 
tion (acquisition of which will require MDC and City of Boston 
approval); also, we have not acquired the mud flats north of the 
site, although they were included in the original budget, nor have 
we acquired the yacht club, and may never do so. Further, it is 
not possible at this time to determine what a court judgment might 
do to us. Presumably, Mr. O'Brien said, Boston College High will 
seek one, and an award may be made which will require us to go back 
to the Legislature for additional appropriations. 

Omission of the item for design of College Three is a 
serious loss, Mr. O'Brien continued. This means we cannot meet the 
schedule on enrolments, and so will need to go back to the Legisla- 
ture to regain those funds next summer, probably in July or August. 

Chairman Haigis queried whether, in the absence of design 
funds for College Three, the plans for College Two could be utilized. 
After discussion, it was agreed that this would not be feasible. 

Vice Chancellor Hamilton observed that College Three was 
scheduled to come on line one year after the opening of the campus 
at Columbia Point. Since this will not happen, other arrangements 
will be required to accommodate approximately 2,000 students. 

Mr. O'Brien added that there was no specific allocation of 
funds for the design of the bus station. 

The next major deletion is the proposed transit link. 
Despite a number of attempts, the University has not been successful 
in obtaining an appropriation for this item. 

Net changes bring the budget to approximately $133*000,000 
The initial capital outlay was $^0, 000, 000 last year. As part of 
the capital outlay appropriation this year, there has been a contin- 
gency item of $16,000,000 for all construction projects in the Com- 
monwealth. This amount is intended to cover unexpected contingen- 
cies in any project up to a total of %% 3 not including land. How- 
ever, there is no assurance that the University will obtain a por- 
tion of this sum. 

Mr. Kusack reported that the original contingency fund was 
set at approximately $21,000,000, with $5,000,000 specifically ear- 
marked for the Columbia Point project. However, the latter was 
eliminated in the final appropriation. In talks with Mr. Shepard, 
Mr. Kusack came up with a rough cost estimate of $136,000,000 for 
Columbia Point, with 2.5 million dollars deferred (site work) to a 
later date. This would permit the campus to open and be operable by 
1972. 

Mr. Shepard agreed to meet the Project Office halfway and 
grant access by the University to the contingency fund providing the 



1 



COMMITTEE 



\1 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

University, for its part, made every effort to keep costs within the 
budget and also eliminate things that could be put in at a later 
date — items which would not add an appreciable amount to the project 
cost. 

Chairman Haigis queried whether the 9.9 million dollars 
budgeted for the transit system had been eliminated, or merely 
deferred. Mr. O'Brien responded that, after the campus is opera- 
tive, if serious transportation problems develop and there is an 
inundation of students, the University will be provided with the 
best possible argument for returning to the Legislature with a 
request for funds. 

Mr. O'Brien summed up and gave his main point: If we miss 
our target date by any serious amount of time, all phases of con- 
struction will cost more money. Anything beyond a three -month delay 
could result not only in a 1.%% per month escalation, but- -under a 
new building trades contract — to $% per month. Basically, this 
averages out close to 15>-20$ per year. He pointed out that no pro- 
vision has been made for this factor. 



Plan. " 



Question was raised concerning impact from the "Boston 
The conclusion was, perhaps none. 



Mr. O'Brien felt that we could make the budget, or very 
close to it, without reduction in the building program or building 
quality. As a final possibility, he suggested that savings could be 
made by moving the entire project back (west), since a great deal of 
monev was involved in the dike. This could result in a savines of 
approximately $1;, 000, 000, but action on this would have to be taken 
now. 

Trustee Pumphret noted that a full presentation on this 
matter should be given to the Trustees if it is important that this 
sum be saved. This is no offhand matter. Mr. Kusack observed that 
he was "completely opposed to changing horses in midstream." The 
committee recessed for lunch. 

Following lunch, the committee reconvened and took up the 
final item on the agenda, Review of Work Drawings and Specifications 
for the Library, Administration Building, Service Building, and 
Chiller Building, UM/Boston . On hand were consultants and archi- 
tects for the several projects, along with Messrs. Belluschi and 
Sasaki as overall coordinating architects. 

Dean Belluschi observed that he was satisfied with the 
form of the project and felt that the buildings were "wonderful and 
functional." He added, however, that we need to be sure of the 
color on the outside and must have good exterior materials. 

Mr. Sasaki observed that a great problem exists in con- 
structing this kind of interlocking campus with buildings designed 
by six different architects. "We have been delightfully surprised 
by the cooperation extended by the various architects, " he said. 



3611 



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9-10-70 



Review of Work 
Drawings and 
Specifications 
for the Library, 
Administration 
Building, Service 
Building, and 
Chiller Building, 
UM/Boston 



3612 



B & G 
9-10-70 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

"The chief problems are the lack of mass transit and the nature of 
the basic site itself." 

Mr. Sasaki continued, that the next phase will consist of 
costing out the several projects with the contractors and "this 
will be difficult in view of the problem of a contracting, rather 
than an expanding, budget." He expressed the hope that this factor 
would not cause deterioration of quality in the buildings. He 
emphasized that the contribution made by himself and Dean Belluschi 
has been that of an "overview." 

Chairman Haigis further noted the excellent cooperation 
between the BBC, the University administration, and the architects. 

Trustee Pumphret expressed the hope that, if any deletions 
are necessary, they will come out of furniture and equipment rather 
than the buildings themselves ; also, that the University should go 
back to the Legislature for additional appropriations, if necessary. 

General discussion followed on the quality and cost of the 
brick facing material which will be uniform throughout the several 
colleges, the science building and the library. Mr. Kusack observed 
that the BBC wants Massachusetts manufacturers to be able to bid on 
the work; however, there is a question whether they can provide a 
brick which everyone will like. It is also well known that Massa- 
chusetts firms would not be able to provide iron in their clay. He 
said that if brick could be obtained at the cost of $100 per thou- 
sand feet, this would represent a savings of $200,000 on the project 

There followed next a presentation of working drawings on 
the Library by Harry Lizeck of Reese Associates ; of the Administra- 
tion Building by Mr. Clancy of Goody and Clancy; of the Central 
Service and Storage Building by David Wallace of Geometries, Inc.; 
and of the Chiller Building by Mr. Robert Cantrell of MBM. 

The Trustees reviewed the drawings with interest, made 
appropriate inquiries, and it was then moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that Vice Chancel 
lor William R. Hamilton, Jr., be, and he hereby is, 
authorized on behalf of the Board of Trustees of the 
University of Massachusetts to approve working drawings 
for Buildings 090, 110, 1^0, and 160 including all con- 
tracts under the supervision of Charles T. Main, and 
to approve specifications, including specifications for 
exterior building finish materials on said projects for 
the Columbia Point campus of the University of Massa- 
chusetts at Boston. 



The meeting was ad j ournetT^t 3'-3% p.m. 




Robert J 
Secretary, 



IcCartney . 
ioard of Trusteed 



1 



:OMMITTEE 



I 



J 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS 

October 13, 1970, 11:00 a.m., Room 901, Campus Center, UM/Amherst 

PRESENT: Committee Members and Trustee Staff : 

Chairman Haigis, President Wood; Trustees Chandler, 
Crowley, Lambs on, Knowles; Treasurer Johnson, Secretary 
McCartney, Mrs. Hull 

Administrators, Faculty, Staff, and Invited Guests : 

From System Office : Dr. Bush-Brown, Consultant 

From UM/Amherst : Chancellor Tippo; Dean McGuirk; Faculty 
Senate Representative John Roberts; Messrs. Littlefield, 
Paradis, Norton 

From UM/Boston : Vice Chancellor Hamilton, Messrs. O'Brien 
Prince 

From UM/¥orcester : Mr. Stockwell 

Also : From Bureau of Building Construction : Mr. Harding 
From Jackson and Moreland : Messrs. Davidson and 
Fullerton 

From Sasaki, Dawson, DeMay Associates: Messrs. 
Freebody and Galehouse 

The meeting was convened at 11:10 a.m. by Trustee Crowley, 
serving as Chairman pro tern . 

Power Plant- -UM/Amherst was presented by Treasurer Johnson 
as the first agenda item. He reviewed background related to the 
development of this facility which is to be constructed at an ini- 
tial appropriation this year of $9 million with later expansion pos- 
sible. Comprehensive studies have been carried out to determine 
site location, fuel availabilities and air pollution factors. 
Related studies have been concerned with the general problem of 
waste disposal and resultant air pollution as well as future avail- 
ability of fuel supplies. 

Mr. Johnson introduced Mr. Fullerton, Vice President of 
Jackson and Moreland, engineering consultants, who summarized the 
principal features of the firm's report. This included a feasibility 
study of incinerator incorporation with the power plant and a 
detailed study of air pollution abatement. In regard to the incin- 
erator study, Mr. Fullerton said that the best solutions to the 
waste disposal problem were, in ranking order, (l) a sanitary land- 
fill operation jointly carried out with the Town of Amherst, (2) a 
landfill operation with another adjacent town, and (3) construction 
of an incinerator. Plans for the power plant would allow for con- 
struction, if necessary, of two 90-ton -per-day incinerators, at a 
cost of $3,000,000 for construction. Sanitary landfill operation 
costs would be much less, particularly if cooperative arrangements 



361 H 



Power Plant, 
UM/Amherst 



3614 



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COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

are worked, out with the Town of Amherst. Possible sites for such a 
landfill operation are under exploration, Mr. Johnson said, and he 
will be reporting back to the committee on this. 

Mr. Fullerton summarized details of operation of the power 
plant, with three boilers planned for initial installation (a fourth 
to be added in 1975). The fuel system is to be oil, backed up by 
natural gas when it becomes available, and with crude oil as a third 
possibility. Gaseous effluents have been completely computer ana- 
lyzed, and one 1^0 -foot stack is designed to meet all air pollution 
requirements. The tie-line to campus will be two 20-inch lines. 
Two 500, 000 -gall on storage tanks will provide two weeks supply of 
fuel at the peak load period of January, 1°80. 

Treasurer Johnson reported that the Commissioner of Admin- 
istration has requested the University to review fuel alternatives 
because of the current fuel crisis. 

Mr. Norton reviewed details of the current fuel situation, 
with ample supplies of coal on hand through the first of the year. 
He noted, however, that state institutions are not being guaranteed 
fuel deliveries although coal is being delivered on schedule to the 
University. 

Trustee Chandler raised the question of disposition of 
certain chemical "indisposable" wastes and the possibility of a 
University incinerator providing such a service. Trustee Knowles 
pointed out the existence of various compaction processes for waste 
material and asked if these had been considered. Exploration of 
these and all other possible angles to the waste problem was 
strongly endorsed by Chairman Haigis, who had assumed the chair. 

Mr. Fullerton said that some compaction would be provided 
in the landfill operation by use of a bulldozer, but that cost of 
other compaction processes would be prohibitive. The entire ques- 
tion of waste disposal should, of course, be subject to continuing 
review, he added. 

Treasurer Johnson, noting that the BBC is now authorized 
to go out for bids for the power plant, with a completion date of 
late '72 or early H3, recommended approval of the preliminary plans 
for construction of the Tillson Farm Power Plant as developed to 
date by the engineering consultants. 

After discussion, it was moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that they approve 
the general arrangement for preliminary plans for con- 
struction of the Tillson Farm Power Plant, UM/Amherst, 
as presented by the engineering firm of Jackson and 
Moreland. 

It was also 



COMMITTEE 



3615 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that the engineer- 
ing firm of Jackson and Moreland be requested by the 
Bureau of Building Construction to furnish a Report to 
the Trustees of the University of Massachusetts and BBC 
on possible future fuel shortages and plans for alter- 
nate fuel supply arrangements without delay of the 
design of the present plant. 

Modular Classroom Sites, LIM/Amherst, were reviewed by Mr. 
Littlefield. He described the units being recommended as being tem- 
porary (durability of l£+ years) and relocatable. This type of 
structure, he said, is necessitated by the fact that the Amherst 
campus is operating at 20$ below the facility capacity required and 
the rate of permanent building appropriation and completion will not 
overcome this deficit for the next several years. The structures 
being proposed can be bid incrementally, and there is a choice of 
sites. Efficient location on campus, as well as aesthetics and traf- 
fic have been among the criteria considered. The site between Boy- 
den and Hicks is felt to be the most suitable and could accommodate 
up to 10% of the proposed units. If it becomes necessary to locate 
a new building on a site on which a temporary structure has been 
placed (and this is not anticipated) cost of relocation of the tem- 
porary structure would be included in cost estimates of the new 
building. 

Mr. Littlefield pointed out that the project must be bid 
incrementally (minimum lj.0,000 GSF — maximum 60,000 GSF) by site (both 
construction and component) to permit flexibility in award within 
$2,000,000 ceiling (total project cost). Components will be bid 
first to allow lead time for material orders and shop loading while 
foundation, utility service, and site development designs are in 
process. 

Dr. Bush-Brown commented that this type of structure could 
be "extremely attractive" if properly sited and landscaped and color 
is used aesthetically. He stressed also the importance of avoiding 
a "lock-step" placement of structures on the site. Chairman Haigis 
agreed emphatically with the overall importance of landscaping which 
will be reviewed with the Trustees later in the development of this 
project. 



and 



After further general discussion, it was moved, seconded 



VOTED: To recommend to the Board of Trustees that they approve 
three sites for the location of modular facilities : 

1. On the former lacrosse field between Boyden and 
Hicks (approximately 70,000 gross square feet). 

2. Between Stockbridge and Infirmary Road on the site 
formerly occupied by the old Conservation Building 

(approximately 20,000 gross square feet). 

3. East of the Marks Meadow playground (10,000 gross 
square feet). 



B & G 
10-13-70 



Modular Class- 
room Sites, 
UM/Amherst 



3616 



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10-13-70 



COMMITTEE 



Sasaki Report — 
Housing Survey, 
UM/Amherst 



Boathouse for 
Crew, UM/Amherst 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

The Sasaki Report- -Housing Survey, UM/Amherst, was 
reviewed during the recess for lunch by Mr. Galehouse of Sasaki, 
Dawson, DeMay Associates. Much comprehensive study has been done on 
the problem since the beginning of the survey last spring. A grow- 
ing need for more low-cost housing than is now available is clearly 
shown by the study with the crucial period for housing expected in 
'73 to '75. 

President Wood noted that enrollment projections are for 
planning only and have not been approved. 

Student response to questionnaires sent out as part of the 
study indicate that although a large number of students are satis- 
fied with dormitory living arrangements, room costs can be reduced 
by "clubbing" in apartments and this is often a decisive factor. 
Students preferring to live in apartments want to be within a com- 
muting range of not over five miles from the campus, so the impact 
on the closest surrounding towns must be considered. 

The survey indicates that types of housing for students 
other than dormitories should be explored. Mr. Galehouse used the 
example at Sacramento State College of a "mini -village" of married 
student townhouse apartments which was constructed at 2$% less cost 
than would have been possible in the private sector and which has 
proved to be very successful. 

President Wood noted here that some of the success of the 
Sacramento project was due to the fact that it had been subsidized 
in part by the Federal government, and that such subsidies were not 
now available. 

Dr. Bush-Brown observed that not numbers, but aspects of 
changing student life styles and types and quality of housing should 
be the prime considerations. He described a type of student housing 
arrangement proving to be very successful in Europe — a "kind of hos- 
telry" which provides a minimum of utilities in clusters with dining 
areas and child care centers, etc. 

Mr. Galehouse summarized the major issues to be considered 
in evaluation of development alternatives as: (l) low-cost option 
for students requiring this, (2) recognition of student location 
preference, (3) University responsibility to provide quality housing 
environment for students, (k) traffic and parking problems generated 
by new development, (f>) ."the possibility that the private sector may 
not meet future housing needs as it has in the past, and (6) com- 
munity planning issue. 

After discussion it was agreed that a special meeting 
would be held to explore further the questions raised to date by the 
survey report. An early determination of growth rates is necessary. 

Boathouse for Crew, UM/Amherst, was next taken up by the 
committee. Dean McGuirk described the current 120-man crew program 
and expressed the hope that a sailing program can also be estab- 
lished. 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

The crew presently uses rented facilities just north of 
the Coolidge Bridge in Northampton. The owner, because of his inter' 
est in the crew, has offered to sell the property to the University 
for $28,000. In addition to the 99x1-1.4 -foot building now used by the 
crew for storage of shells, there is a 200-foot frontage on the 
Connecticut River. The building has garage-type doors and ramps and 
would need only the addition of hot water and showers to be a fine 
facility for crew purposes. 

The committee gave enthusiastic approval to acquisition of 
this property for crew use and for a future sailing program. Chan- 
cellor Tippo may include this item in the forthcoming Capital Outlay 
Budget. 

Fraternity-Sorority Park Development, UM/Amherst, was next 
discussed by Treasurer Johnson. Development of this project is cur- 
rently at a complete standstill due to the "tight money" situation. 
The fraternities involved are in serious financial difficulties. 
There is a possibility, however, that the Development Corporation of 
America may buy the "back" half of the property for construction of 
200 housing units, which would ease the situation for the developers 
of the Park. 

After discussion, it was moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that the Univer- 
sity policy of approval of the concept of the present 
arrangement for Fraternity-Sorority Park, UM/Amherst, 
be reaffirmed. 

Phillips Street — Houses for Sale, UM/Amherst, was also 
discussed by the Treasurer. He noted that six older houses are for 
sale by one owner at a total purchase price of $155*000. The land 
area involved is small. 

No action was taken by the committee on this matter. 

Sewer Land, UM/Amherst, was also discussed by Treasurer 
Johnson for informational purposes only. Noting that expansion of 
the present town sewage system would become necessary, he mentioned 
the fact that twenty acres of land is now available near the high- 
rise dormitories at the Route 116 interchange. The Treasurer said 
he would investigate further, reporting later to the committee. 

Under Other Business the Treasurer noted that it will be 
desirable for the Building Authority to sell $26 million in bonds 
next month for the dormitory projects. These bonds may be sold on a 
negotiated rather than on a bid basis. The rate- negotiated will 
directly affect student room and board rates, and if higher than 
6.75$ would mean an increase in rates. Such a rate would be unac- 
ceptable. A lower rate is anticipated. Trustee Crowley felt that 
students should be warned now of this possibility. 



361 



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^£- 



Fraternity- 
Sorority Park 
Development, 
UM/Amherst 



Phillips St. 
Houses for Sale, 
UM/Amherst 



Sewer Land, 
UM/Amherst 



Sale of Bonds - 

Dormitories, 

UM/Amherst 



3618 



B & G 
10-13-70 

Capital Outlay — 
Fiscal 1972, 
UM/Boston 

COMMITTEE 

Project Request, 
Phase II -VI, 
Columbia Point, 
UM/Boston 



Project Office, 
UM/Boston 



Methane Gas, 
Columbia Point, 
UM/Boston 



Traffic Inter- 
change, 
UM/Boston 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Capital Outlay- -Fiscal 1972, UM/Boston, was presented by 
Vice Chancellor Hamilton and Mr. O'Brien. $92,M30,000 is requested 
for Phase II of Columbia Point construction. This includes College 
030, one-half of the Science Building (half previously funded) and a 
Physical Education Building (Document T71-03U )* This, Mr. O'Brien 
said, is in line with the Master Plan, with modifications. 

Mr. O'Brien used several charts and graphs to show projec- 
tions for academic space, through Phase VI. Enrollment projections 
for 1980 are at 1^,000 students at Columbia Point. College 030, 
deleted from the FY '71 request, has been carried over to the cur- 
rent request. Another major change proposed by vote of the Faculty 
Senate is to move construction of Physical Education facilities 
scheduled for 1978 up to the 1972 request. The rationale is that, 
otherwise, there will be no recreational outdoor space throughout the 
period of major construction at Columbia Point. 

The UM/Boston administration requests, Mr. O'Brien said, 
approval for the modification of the CO II Form already filed being 
modified by the filing of a CO I Form for $92,lj.80,000. 

Vice Chancellor Hamilton suggested that action on this 
matter await the President's recommendations of priorities for all 
campuses. This suggestion was accepted by the committee. A more 
complete review of this capital outlay request will be scheduled at 
a later date. 

Chairman Haigis strongly urged that the architects on all 
projects be requested to furnish models of the buildings under con- 
sideration, or at least drawing of facades and aesthetics, for the 
committee's study at this meeting. Comment was made that the con- 
struction even of cardboard models sometimes runs to an exorbitant 
figure . 

It was also noted by the Chairman that there was no assur- 
ance that the Project Office, which has operated so successfully 
throughout Phase I of Columbia Point construction, would be con- 
tinued. 

After discussion, it was moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that they express 
endorsement of the concept of a Project Office opera- 
tion throughout Columbia Point construction. 

Vice Chancellor Hamilton, updating the committee on the 
methane gas situation, said that reports from the three independent 
consulting firms working on this situation had been expected by this 
time, but there has been some delay. Chairman Haigis stressed the 
urgency of the situation and requested that the reports be expedited. 

Mr. O'Brien also reviewed preliminary sketch plans for the 
University of Massachusetts/Boston traffic interchange as presented 
by Edwards and Kelcey. The design for this long concrete span has 



1 



COMMITTEE 



II 



J 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

been approved by Boston College High and by Sasaki, Dawson, DeMay 
Associates, although not yet by Dean Belluschi. 

Reporting for UM/Worcester, Mr. Stockwell reviewed pro- 
gress on construction for the Medical School. The power plant is 
two months ahead of schedule and work is in progress on the foot- 
ings for the clinical science building. Efforts to fund the hos- 
pital are concentrated on HEW. 

Student Residence Plans, UM/Worcester , were also reviewed 
by Mr. Stockwell. He pointed out a proposed location for the first 
residences on a site adjacent to Belmont Avenue. The rationale for 
this site selection is that the buildings could be converted later, 
if desired, to facilities for para-medical training or other uses. 
Residences may be clustered on the hill during later phases of 
development. 

Alternatives to building residences now on this site were 
discussed. The possibility of objection to the Belmont site for 
this purpose because of the noise factor was raised. Other alterna- 
tives to the residence problem will be explored at the direction of 
Chairman Haigis, particularly on the possibility of legislation 
authorizing UM/Building Authority involvement on the UM/Worcester 
campus. 

The meeting was adjourned at 1;:10 p.m. 




Robert J. I McCartney 
Secretary, Board of Truste 



3619 



B & G 
10-13-70 



Construction 
Progress, 
UM/Wbrc ester 



Studait Residence 
Plans , 
UM/Worcester 



3620 



COMMITTEE 



Dissolution of 
Department of 
Pharmacology and 
Teaching of 
Pharmacology, 
UE/Wbrc ester 



Personnel 

Actions, 

IM/Amherst 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON FACULTY AND 

EDUCATIONAL POLICY 

October Ik, 1970, 11:00 a.m., Room 1;12, Statler Hilton, Boston 

PRESENT: Committee Members and Trustee Staff : 

Chairman Troy, President Wood; Trustees Elters, Lyons; 
Secretary McCartney 

Administrators, Faculty, Staff, and Invited Guests : 

From UM/Amherst : Chancellor Tippo, Associate Provost 
Gluckstern, Dean Appley; Professor Thelwell; Professor 
Roberts, Faculty Senate Representative 

From UM/Boston : Chancellor Broderick, Dean Hoopes 

From UM/Worcester : Associate Dean Richard Saunders; 
Dr. Butcher, Chairman, Chemistry Department 

Chairman Troy called the meeting to order at 11:05 a.m. 

The first agenda item considered was Dissolution of 
Department of Pharmacology and Teaching of Pharmacology, UM/Worcester 



Associate Dean Saunders distributed a position paper on this topic tc 
the committee. Briefly, the Medical School proposes to keep its com- 
mitment to a Department of Pharmacology as flexible as possible 
while the school is still small, so that the most effective manner of 
teaching this subject can be evaluated. Dr. Saunders indicated that 
recruitment of faculty in this field is fairly difficult; also, that 
the personnel do not identify with their own field as well as to 
biologists, for example. 

In essence, the Medical School proposes to include pharma- 
cologists in the Departments of Biochemistry and Physiology for the 
teaching of second -year pharmacology, and into the Department of 
Medicine for the teaching of therapeutics during the third and 
fourth years. The faculty members incorporated into the Departments 
of Biochemistry and Physiology would be charged primarily with the 
responsibility of teaching pharmacology, but would also teach in 
biochemistry and physiology. At the same time, the faculties of 
biochemistry and physiology will also teach in pharmacology where 
their particular areas of expertise would be of greatest advantage. 

Trustee Lyons queried whether any vote of the committee 
would be required to effect this alteration in strategy. Dr. 
Saunders responded that he was simply informing the committee of the 
proposed change since the Trustees had established a Department of 
Pharmacology at the Medical School in earlier action. 

The second item considered was two Personnel Actions at 
Ul/Amherst. 



Chancellor Tippo first reported on a promising nominee to 



1 



COMMITTEE 



:] 



J 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

fill the vacant post of Visiting Professor in Practical Politics. 
Whether this assignment would be filled for a single semester or for 
the entire academic year is still under discussion. The nominee is 
Senate President Morris Donahue. 

The second personnel action concerned a candidate to be 
appointed as Visiting Lecturer in the DuBois Department of African 
Studies at UM/Amherst. Chancellor Tippo presented the name of 
Herbert Apthecker, a biographer and present custodian of the papers 
of ¥. E. B. DuBois. 

Mr. Apthecker was born in Brooklyn and holds the B.S., 
M.A.j and Ph.D. degrees from Columbia University. He has served as 
Lecturer at Bryn Mawr College. He has published twenty-seven books 
since 1938. He is also a member of the Communist Party. 

The Chancellor reported that he had had a long interview 
with Mr. Apthecker. In 19U6 he entered the U.S. Army as a private 
and came out as a Major. The Chancellor added that he had pressed 
Mr. Apthecker on such questions as whether he could teach as a free 
agent (answer, affirmative). He stated that his entire life was 
devoted to scholarship. 

Mr. Apthecker is regarded as a leader in the field of 
Black History. Extensive recital of Mr. Apthecker' s qualifications, 
and the comments of colleagues and nationally distinguished his- 
torians followed, in which it was developed that some historians 
regard Mr. Apthecker 1 s handling of black history as "exaggerating 
the role of the black man and the black contribution, particularly 
in pre-Civil War rebellions," etc. 

Professor Thelwell, Head of the DuBois Department of Black 
Studies at UM/Amherst, was asked to comment. He asserted that other 
Black Studies Department faculty members are not Marxist^ therefore, 
Mr. Apthecker 's views would represent a minority. Extensive discus- 
sion on the appointment has taken place within the Black Studies 
Department, Professor Thelwell said, and the consensus is that the 
faculty have no question whatsoever concerning Mr. Apthecker 's 
qualifications and scholarship. Further, they feel that an appoint- 
ment, if offered to him, should be on the basis of his scholarship 
and not his politics. 

Within the five-college community, Black Studies faculty 
members would have "absolutely no hesitation" in recommending his 
appointment and the consensus was that "his presence would add a 
great deal." 

Trustee Lyons commented that Mr. Apthecker 's books were 
written mostly in the l°lj.O's and 195>0's. He queried whether the 
candidate was still active in scholarship and authorship. The 
answer was in the affirmative. Mr. Thelwell added that the verdict 
of his department was unanimous in favor of the Apthecker appoint- 
ment. It was pointed out that, in 1970, Mr. Apthecker had produced 
another book: Urgency of Marxist-Christian Dialogue . 



362 



F & EP 
10-1U-70 



362', 



F & EP 
lO-Hi-70 



> 



COMMITTEE 



Status of ROTC 

Negotiations, 

UM/Amherst 



Organization of 

Faculty, 

UM/Boston 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Dean Appley of the Graduate School pointed out that the 
original interest in Mr. Apthecker's appointment derived from the 
University Press which is under his jurisdiction. The Press plans 
at the moment to produce two volumes (of ten) on the DuBois papers. 
It is estimated that production of the entire DuBois papers repre- 
sents a ten-year project (eight additional volumes). The University 
Library has expressed interest in acquiring the DuBois papers for 
its permanent collection, and a possibility exists that the Univer- 
sity might eventually become their repository. 

Dean Appley reported further that application for a grant 
from the National Endowment for Humanities had been made, but that 
Mr. Apthecker would not have an opportunity to obtain such support 
unless he has an academic base. 

President Wood was requested to check out legal aspects of 
this appointment with Mr. Broadhurst of Ely, Bartlett, Brown and 
Proctor. 

Chairman Troy observed that he was not concerned with Mr. 
Apthecker's emphasis on the black role in history; but, rather, was 
worried about a possibility of "Marxist rigidity." 

Dean Appley reported that the New York Times has a major 
reprinting house (Arno Press) which has approached Mr. Apthecker to 
do a thirty-volume reprint in collaboration with the University 
Press. 

Chairman Troy concluded discussion by suggesting that 
investigation be made of any possibility that this appointment might 
be considered a five-college appointment, rather than simply a Uni- 
versity appointment. 

Under Other Business , Chancellor Tippo gave a brief report 
on the status of ROTC negotiations. He referred to a letter from 
George Benson, Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense, which indi- 
cates that the federal authorities are going along with most of the 
recommendations presented by the UM/Amherst Faculty Senate and the 
Board of Trustees. Two negotiating sessions have been held, one 
with the Army and one with the Air Force. At present, the legisla- 
tion embracing revised contract conditions is being prepared to go 
to the next session of Congress. 

On another subject, at the invitation of Chairman Troy, 
Robert Hoopes, Dean of Faculty at UM/Boston, reported that the pro- 
cess of "mitosis" or division of departments and faculty members for 
assignment to various colleges at UM/Boston had commenced. Several 
means of achieving this division were outlined, and the final result 
is that faculty members are being urged to work out this matter for 
themselves. 

"When we reach a stable enrollment, we may go for depart- 
ment chairmanships," Dean Hoopes said, "but not yet." The Dean felt 
strongly that, in the early days, an effort must be made to build 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

departments, and that the various colleges will arise from this 
base. Dean Hoopes emphasized, however, the desire at UM/Boston to 
set up the colleges on the basis of "pedagogical diversity. " 

Chairman Troy suggested to Dean Appley of the UM/Amherst 
Graduate School that the Committee on Faculty and Educational Policy 
would later on welcome his presentation of a review of UM/Amherst 
Graduate School progress with enrollment, new programs, etc. 

Chancellor Broderick reported that UM/Boston has under- 
taken to give one course this term on Sociology, the Library and the 



Urban Child; and one next term on English, Children's Literature for 
library aides in the public schools of Boston, as well as for any 
regular students at UM/Boston who may be interested. 

In order to pay tuition under a federal grant, the School 
Committee of Boston needs to sign a contract with UM/Boston for 
approximately $2,300. The Chancellor requested that the committee 
recommend to the Board of Trustees that Vice Chancellor Hamilton be 
authorized to sign said contract for the Board of Trustees. 

After brief discussion, it was then moved, seconded and 

VOTED ; To recommend to the Board of Trustees that Vice Chan- 
cellor William R. Hamilton, UM/Boston, be and he 
hereby is authorized to sign a contract with the School 
Committee of Boston in the amount of $2,300 so that the 
School Committee may be enabled to pay tuition to the 
University of Massachusetts for library aides in the 
public schools of Boston who desire to take certain 
courses at UM/Boston during the current academic year. 

The meeting was adjourned at 12:30 p.m. 




fobert J/i 
Secretary, a 



.cCartne; 
rd of Trustee 




3623 



F & EP 
10-lii-70 



Courses for 
Library Aides, 
UM/Boston 



3624 



COMMITTEE 



Rec ommendations 
of Investment 
Counsel, 
UM/Amherst 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON FINANCE 

October 16, 1970, 10:30 a.m., Exeter Room, Hotel Lenox, Boston 

PRESENT : Committee Members and Trustee Staff : 

Chairman Pumphret, President Wood; Trustees Gordon, Row- 
land; Trustee Troy; Treasurer Johnson, Mrs. Hull 

Administrators, Faculty, Staff, and Invited Guests : 

From System Office : Vice President Phillips 

From UM/Amherst : Chancellor Tippo; Messrs. Brand, Clay 

From UM/Boston : Chancellor Broderick, Vice Chancellor 
Hamilton 

Also: From Standish, Ayer & Wood : Mr. Ladd 

The meeting was convened by Chairman Pumphret at 11:15 am. 

Recommendations of Investment Counsel, UM/Amherst, was the 
first agenda item taken up by the committee. Mr. Ladd, of Standish, 
Ayer & Wood, presented a detailed appraisal of the Endowment Fund 
portfolio, based on October 2 prices, and reviewed the general out- 
look for the investment market. He also circulated statistical 
information on diversification, income and quality of Endowment Fund 
holdings (Document T71-035 )° 

As of October 2, 1970, the portfolio was distributed 30.9 
percent on bonds, 2.9 percent in preferred stocks (mostly convert- 
ibles) and 66.1 in commons. There have been no major changes in dis' 
tribution of the fund in recent years, and It is suggested that the 
current position of having about two-thirds of the market value in 
equities be maintained. 

Recommendations on a program of investment of approximately 
$31,200 in cash, and the reinvestment of the proceeds of the $55,000 
of U.S. Treasury 5s, maturing on November 15, were considered. It 
is felt to be advisable to switch U.S. Plywood common to convertible 
in order to improve income on this holding. 

After discussion, it was moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that they author- 
ize the Treasurer of the University, Kenneth W. Johnson; 
to execute the following changes in the University's 
investment portfolio as recommended by Standish, Ayer 
and Wood, Inc. 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Cost Price Market Income 



Now 

Hold Sell Issue __ 

I4.OO UOO U.S. Plywood 

($0.81|) $11,665 27 $10,800 $ 33$ 
Buy 

- $2^7000 High-grade indus. 100 $25,000 $2,156 

bonds 8-7/8$? 

- $lj.0,000 Short-term Treas. 100 1+0,000 2,800 

bonds 7%? 
300 i;00 Addressograph ($1.1*0) 30 12,000 560 

700 U.S. Plywood $1.20 cv. 27 18,900 81+0 



Resulting 
Holding 



$25,000 

Uo,ooo 

21,000 
18,900 



New Endowment Funds, UM/Amherst, were discussed by Trea- 
surer Johnson. Funds involved are to be established, with principle 
invested and income used as indicated in each case. 

Theodore C. Caldwell Endowment Fund 

Dr. Theodore C. Caldwell, professor emeritus of history, 
retired in June of this year. He was appointed to the University of 
Massachusetts faculty in 1935. 

He was, in addition to his academic duties, a faculty fel- 
low for the Southwest Residential College, a member of the history 
department executive committee, and department head. He has also 
served on such University committees as University Affairs and the 
College of Arts and Sciences Curriculum Study Committee. 

Among his publications is "The Anglo-Boer War--Why Was It 
Fought," published as part of the "Problems in European Civilization' ' 
series. His field is English history. 

A graduate of Wooster College, Professor Caldwell received 
his M.A. degree from Harvard University and his Ph.D. degree from 
Yale. 

After discussion, it was moved, seconded and 

VOTED: To recommend to the Board of Trustees acceptance of the 
Theodore C. Caldwell Fund, in the amount of $1,050.00, 
as an Endowment Fund for the purpose of appropriating 
funds from annual income for books to be added to the 
University of Massachusetts/Amherst Library, awards to 
deserving students, purchase of books to be added to 
the History Department Library and significant grants 
for research in History. All of the foregoing is to be 
done in honor of Professor Caldwell. The designations 
to be made annually by the Department Head (or Chairman ^ 
with selected members of the History Department. Income 
not used for awards during the fiscal year shall be 
added to the principal on June 30. Benefits from this 
fund are restricted to students in attendance at the 
Amherst Campus. 



3625 



Finance 
10-16-70 



New Endowment 

Funds, 

UM/Amherst 



Theodore C. 
Caldwell Endow- 
ment Fund 



3626 



Finance 
10-16-70 



COMMITTEE 



Oreana Merriam 
Educational 
Endowment Fund, 
UM/Amherst 



University of 
Massachusetts 
Metawampe Fund, 
UM/Amherst 



Frank R. Shaw 
Endowment Fund, 
UM/Amherst 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Oreana Merriam Educational Endowment Fund 

It was also 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that gifts from 
alumni and friends for the purpose of establishing an 
endowment fund — School of Home Economics — which was 
accepted by the Finance Committee at its meeting on 
December 1, 1969, now be formally accepted as the Oreans 
Merriam Educational Endowment Fund, and that the Finance 
Committee vote recorded on Page 3l;l6 be changed from the 
Helen S. Mitchell Endowment Fund to reflect the new 
name. 

Present balance: $1,623.02 

University of Massachusetts Metawampe Fund 

It was also 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees acceptance of the 
"University of Massachusetts Metawampe Fund, " in the 
amount of $l,0£0 o 00, as an Endowment Fund for the purpose 
of providing loans, scholarships and grants from annual 
income for needy University of Massachusetts/Amherst 
students. The fund to be administered by the Scholar- 
ship & Financial Aid Committee or any other committee 
designated by the Chancellor of the University of 
Massachusetts/Amherst. 

Frank R. Shaw Endowment Fund 

Dr. Shaw received his Bachelor's here at the University in 
1931 and his Ph.D. at Cornell in 1936. He was appointed to the 
faculty of the Department of Entomology in 1935 and retired Febru- 
ary 1, 1970. He is now a Professor Emeritus of the University. 

Dr. Shaw carried a heavy teaching-research and extension 
load during his years at the University and also developed an out- 
standing rapport with students. Because of this, the alumni and 
friends of Dr. Shaw thought that it would be appropriate to establish 
this outstanding fund that would provide monies for the purchase of 
entomological books for beginning students in the field of ento- 
mology. 

It was also 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees acceptance of the 
Frank R. Shaw fund, in the amount of $828.00, as an 
Endowment Fund, for the purpose of appropriating funds 
from annual income for the purchase of entomological 
books for beginning students in the field of entomology; 
awards to be made to Entomology majors who are enrolled 
as full-time undergraduate or graduate students and, 



1 



COMMITTEE 



] 



] 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

that awards will be made by the department head in con- 
sultation with selected members of the University of 
Massachusetts/Amherst Entomology Department. Income 
not used during the fiscal year shall be added to prin- 
cipal on June 30. Benefits from this fund are 
restricted to students in attendance at the Amherst 
Campus 

Harold W. Cary Prize Fund 

Dr. Harold ¥. Cary, Professor Emeritus of History, retired 
in 1969 after 36 years of service. 

Primarily a scholar and teacher in the field of American 
diplomatic history, Professor Cary also served as the historian of 
the University. His book, The University of Massachusetts : History 
of One Hundred Years , published in 1963, traced the growth of the 
institution from the time of the Civil War, through its fledgling 
years as an agricultural college, and into the modern period of 
dynamic growth and recognition as a major university. 

In addition to teaching diplomatic history to thousands of 
undergraduate and graduate students, Professor Cary served as Chair- 
man of the Department of History for seven years. 

He received his Bachelor's degree from Williams College, 
his Master's from Harvard University, and his Ph.D. from Tale Uni- 
versity. 

It was also 

VOTED: To recommend to the Board of Trustees acceptance of the 
Harold W. Cary Prize Fund, in the amount of $79U.OO, as 
an Endowment Fund. The prize to be regularly awarded 
from annual income to a graduating senior who has the 
highest average in History courses during his or her 
years at the University of Massachusetts/Amherst. 
Income not used for awards shall be added to the prin- 
cipal on June 30. Benefits from this fund are 
restricted to students in attendance at the Amherst 
Campus . 

Quarterly Report of Treasurer — Amherst, Boston, Worcester 
(Document T71-036 ) was distributed and reviewed by Mr. Johnson. He 
is searching, the Treasurer said, for a more meaningful method of 
presentation of items in this report so that it will be of more use 
to the Trustees as a basis for financial judgment. 

A change in policy on transfers between subsidiary 
accounts was noted, with all transfers to be presented to the Board 
of Trustees submitted through Vice President Franklyn Phillips at 
the System Office. 

After discussion, it was moved, seconded and 



3627 



Finance 
10-16-70 



Harold W. Cary 
Prize Fund, 
UM/Amherst 



Quarterly Report 
of Treasurer, 
UM/Amherst, 
UM/Boston, 
UM/Wbrc ester 



3628 



Finance 
10-16-70 

Budget Transfers, 
UM/Amherst 



COMMITTEE 



Cash Overage, 
UM/Amherst 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

VOTED : To recommend, to the Board of Trustees transfer of 
$691,750 from account 01 to account 03, Amherst. 

Purposes of the transfers: 

(a) It is proposed to transfer the salaries attached to vacant 
faculty positions from 01 to 03 for the stipends of teach- 
ing assistants appointed as faculty substitutes. This 
step is necessary to assure that all departments are 
staffed at an adequate level for instruction . . . $L|.20,95>0 

(b) It is proposed to transfer funds to raise the standard 
stipend for graduate teaching assistants from $3,000 to 
$3,200 for nine months. $1^0 of this raise represents 
inflation since the last adjustment of this stipend. This 
item was in our 1971 budget request $l£0,lj.00 

(c) It is proposed to transfer the salaries of vacant faculty 
positions which have been committed to the appointment of 
visiting lecturers ; $ 1±5>,1|00 

(d) It is proposed to transfer funds to the Physical Plant 
Department to permit increased use of outside architectural 
and engineering services in the alteration and maintenance 
programs $ 75,000 

It was also 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees transfer of 
$113,600 from account 01 to account 02, Amherst. 

Purpose of transfer: To cover the cost of sabbatical leave 
replacements and sick leave replacements, the appropriations 
being insufficient for these purposes $113,600 

Future transfers. It is too soon to state primarily what 
further transfers will be needed during the rest of the year. 
Current projections, however, include additional sums for over- 
time, the 1971 summer session, student labor, the library, 
instructional needs of the second semester, and certain pro- 
grams not currently funded. 

Cash Overage — UM/Amherst was discussed by Treasurer John- 
son. He said that there is a cash overage for receiving tellers in 
the amount of $l6I|..82 and recommended that this amount be trans- 
ferred to the Trust Fund Interest Account. 

After discussion, and on motion made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that Treasurer 
Kenneth ¥. Johnson be and he hereby is authorized to 
transfer the Amherst Campus cash overage for receiving 
tellers in the Treasurer's Office in the amount of 
$l6U.82 for Fiscal Year 1970 to the Trust Fund Interest 
account. 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

University Fund — Expenditures was the next item discussed 
by the committee. It was the consensus that the practice of itemiz- 
ing expenditures in this fund for presentation to the Trustees was 
unnecessary and should be discontinued. 

Budget Transfers j UM/Boston, as an agenda item was taken 
up by Vice Chancellor Hamilton, who reported that there are no 
transfers requested at this time. 

As Other Business the Vice Chancellor reported that 
UM/Boston has been granted its first general scholarship fund — from 
the Polaroid Corporation in the amount of $5,000. There are no 
restrictions on the fund and the terms of the scholarship will be 
established shortly. 

Selection of Worcester Bank to Serve as a Depository and 
Payroll Account was discussed by Treasurer Johnson, in the absence 
of Dean Soutter. The Dean is anxious to select a bank in Worcester 
to handle payroll accounts for the present, and the larger accounts 
involving • trust funds as these materialize in the future. He has 
suggested that local banks interested in providing this service for 
the Medical School make presentations describing their services at 
informal hearings. 

After considering the matter, it was the committee con- 
sensus that hearings should not be necessary. It was proposed that 
the Treasurer and the Dean select a bank on standing, convenience, 
and types of services offered and recommend one bank to the Finance 
Committee. 

Budget Transfers, UM/Worcester, were discussed by Vice 
President Phillips. A transfer of $11,900 is requested from the 08 
account to the l£ account for the purchase of two panel trucks and a 
truck with plow. The equipment account has been depleted because of 
equipping new quarters; funds, however, are available in the utility 
account. 

After discussion, it was moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that $11,900 be 
transferred from subsidiary account 08 (heat, etc.) to 
subsidiary account 1$ (equipment) in the Medical School 
appropriation account 7l|.ll-100fj (13^0-38). 

The meeting was adjourned at 12:10 p.m. 



3629 




Robert (J. 
Secretary, 




cCartr 
ard of Trusts 



Finance 
10-16-70 

University Fund- 
Expenditures 



Budget Transfers, 
UM/Boston 



Scholarship Fund- 
Polaroid Corp., 
UM/Boston 



Worcester Bank- 
UM/Worc ester 



Budget Transfers, 
UM/Worcester 



3630 



COMMITTEE 



Relocation of 

President ' s 

Office— 

85 Devonshire 

Street, Boston 



Inauguration of 
President Wood 



: ■ 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

October 16, 1970, 9:00 a.m., Exeter Room, Hotel Lenox, Boston 

PRESENT : Committee Members and Trustee Staff : 

Chairman Healey, President Woodj Trustees Gordon, Haigis, 
Pumphret, Rowland, Troy; Treasurer Johnson, Secretary 
McCartney, Mrs Hull 

Administrators, Faculty, Staff, and Invited Guests : 

From System Office : Vice President Phillips 

From UM/Amherst : Chancellor Tippoj Mr. Clay, Special 
Assistant to the Chancellor 



From UM/Boston: 
Hamilton 



Chancellor Broderick, Vice Chancellor 



Chairman Healey convened the meeting at 9:15> a.m. 
invited comment from President Wood. 



He 



The President reported that the move to 8£ Devonshire 
Street from Cambridge, Massachusetts, has been completed, although 
some further interior furnishing is required. 

The President announced that inauguration ceremonies have 
been set for December 9, at which time the Governor, the Mayor of 
Boston, and the Chairman of the Board indicate that their schedules 
are clear. An appropriate event will take place on each of the 
campuses on that same day. Secretary McCartney has been named 
Chairman of a Coordinating Committee for the Inauguration. Staff 
assistance and coordination will be provided in the President's 
Office by Mrs. Barbara Haviland and Mrs. Harriett Witteriborg. 

On the organization of the President's Office itself, 
Dr. Wood cited his memo of September 3, noting that Franklyn Phillip£ 
had been recommended and appointed to the position of Vice President. 
Shortly, he expects to recommend Mr. Lashman for appointment as 
Vice President for Development. The role of the Treasurer of the 
University was elaborated. The President indicated he had had dis- 
cussions on this matter with Chancellor Broderick and Vice Chancelloi 1 
Hamilton at UM/Boston and with Chancellor Tippo. He indicated that 
the Treasurer has a System -wide responsibility as Treasurer, although 
there is a gray area in terms of service operations. With respect 
to the Treasurer's Amherst campus responsibilities, he termed the 
question "academic" until Chancellor Tippo completes reorganization 
of his own staff, particularly in the area of Vice Chancellorship 
for Administration. Messrs. Tippo and Johnson have been requested 
to discuss the details of this matter between themselves. Vice 
Chancellor Hamilton and Mr. Stockwell will be kept informed. It is 
understood that the search committees appointed by Chancellor Tippo 
may not complete their work prior to January or February of 1971. 
At that time, certain clarifications may be necessary involving the 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

administration of the computer and service areas, together with 
definition of the role of Vice President Phillips with respect to 
personnel and services. The President indicated he would bring his 
September 3 memorandum to the Trustees for consideration at the 
meeting of October 23, 1970. 

Also under review is the appropriate role for several 
staff persons who formerly reported to President Lederle, particu- 
larly in the area of Continuing Education. It was noted that Mr. 
Venman is now Acting Director of Continuing Education at UM/Amherst, 
and that he formerly represented President Lederle with the Com- 
munity College Board. 

Other Continuing Education activities were enumerated in 
Nantucket (UM/Boston) and the role of the University's Field Sta- 
tions at Waltham and Wareham. 

The President has invited John Baker, formerly Assistant 
Secretary of Agriculture, to appraise the University's program in 
Agriculture, and a report is expected to be presented within a month 
after his visit. 

In summary, the President felt that the matter of Exten- 
sion activity was best left as a campus -based operation. It was 
noted that the Legislature has failed to fund Continuing Education 
adequately in past years. Chancellor Tippo pointed out also that 
the Board of Higher Education continues to derive its cost-per- 
student figures without including the budgetary factor represented 
by the Extension Service. 

Trustee Rowland raised the question of the pace of growth 
at UM/Amherst and the eventual size of that campus. Discussion then 
turned to the Long-Range Planning Committee Report submitted from 
UM/Amherst, and Trustee Gordon suggested that this should be con- 
sidered by the full Board of Trustees at a special session before 
plans get too far down the road. President Wood observed that, prio^ 1 
to January 1, he wishes to have all of these matters placed in order 
and to provide a staff position paper on the subject during Novem- 
ber. Chancellor Tippo observed that, should any ceiling be set on 
Amherst growth, it should be established five years in advance so as 
to permit a phasing process. The consensus of the Executive Commit- 
tee was that addition of l,f>00 students in the fall of 1971 at 
UM/Amherst should be approved. 

Treasurer Johnson noted that all of these matters had been 
studied at length and in depth at the staff level, and that all 
campuses are ready to present to the Trustees for resolution the 
policy question on size, growth, etc., of the several units of the 
University. Chancellor Tippo reminded the committee that no dormi- 
tory space is presently programmed for availability at UM/Amherst 
after the fall of 1971. 

With respect to the cost of University housing, Trustee 
Pumphret noted once again that the main problem lies in the area of 



3631 



Executive 
10-16-70 



Continuing 
Education, 
UM/Amherst 



Long-Range 
Planning 
Committee 
Report 



3632 



Executive 
10-16-70 



COMMITTEE 



Guidelines for 
Conduct and 
Contingency 
Planning 



Labor Relations 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

operations and maintenance. 'He feels that a powerful argument could 
be developed with the Legislature to support at least this part of 
the housing operation. Further study, of course, will be needed on 
this.. 

The next item considered was Guidelines for Conduct and 
Contingency Planning . 



President Wood reported that, at his last President's 
Council meeting, Austin Broadhurst was requested to clarify the Uni- 
versity's legal position on outside and internal procedures related 
to rules, regulations, and student conduct. This will be approached 
at two levels: (a) legal standing and (b) how the various codes fit 
together. The President felt that there should be a natural and 
legitimate difference between the approach to this matter on the 
separate campuses. The problem during the current academic year may 
well fall into the area of sabotage and bombings. The President 
added that he has met with Commissioner for Public Safety Powell. 
Vice President Phillips has been requested to continue liaison and 
public safety matters. The receipt of letters from President Nixon, 
FBI Director Hoover, and Senator McGovern with respect to the causes 
of campus unrest were noted. 

Considered next was agenda item two, Labor Relations . The 
President outlined the history of the Labor Relations and Research 
Center established on the UM/Amherst campus approximately eight 
years ago. This unit formerly reported to the Dean of Administratior: 
at Amherst and consists of an undergraduate and graduate program, a 
research arm, and extension activities acting out of Boston, 
Worcester, and in Western Massachusetts. Staff members have been 
assigned to the Center full time, with the exception of Mr. Joseph 
Cass who has also been responsible for Legislative Relations. 

President Wood stressed that the work of the Center is 
highly regarded, and that, in its substantive work, he did not 
believe that this unit should report to the President's Office. He 
believes, therefore, that the graduate and undergraduate operations 
should continue as campus -based activities despite the strong view 
of organized Labor that the Center should come to UM/Boston. Move- 
ment of the present faculty and personnel is unrealistic in his view 
so the President has determined upon a split. In this arrangement, 
the Labor Center would continue to operate at UM/Amherst^ however, 
the extension program under Mr. Cass would be reconstituted for 
administrative purposes to operate on a System -wide basis. 

Thus, the extension work necessary to the research and 
education role and placement of graduate students to teach in exten- 
sion courses would continue to be closely related by annual or semi- 
annual plans. An additional advantage of the reorganization is that 
it provides the President with an institution to deal with general 
problems of labor relations such as affirmative action programs. 
These matters have been discussed with Chancellor Tippo and also 
with the principals involved. The President has elicited their 
separate responses. 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Chancellor Tippo was invited by the President to comment. 
The Chancellor stated he would be remiss not to present the side of 
this question represented by Messrs. Seligman and Friedman. 

Chancellor Tippo continued that the Labor Center is a very 
good operation in all areas : teaching, research, and extension 
activity. Further, the individual staff members, including Messrs. 
Seligman and Friedman, do an excellent job. Director Seligman, for 
example, has probably done more publishing than any other faculty 
member. In effect, the present personnel have a model operation. 
Their feeling on this matter is, Chancellor Tippo said, that if 
extension work is separated out, the Center Director feels an 
emasculation of their program will result. He reflected their view 
that the organization document re the establishment of a System 
Office indicated that the System would not take over campus opera- 
tions. The Labor Center people also point out that they have a 
Labor Council made up of faculty members from various disciplines 
and members of various Labor groups. They feel that the Advisory 
Council should be heard on this matter. 

Chancellor Tippo continued that, in his view, the report- 
ing arrangement in the past has been "rather informal." It is true 
that the Labor Center reported in part to Dean Redfernj however, 
insofar as the academic side and appointments, budget, etc., it had 
reported to him as Provost. The Chancellor emphasized that the 
Labor Center people feel very strongly about the proposed change, 
and he is uncertain whether they will ask to present their views 
before the Board of Trustees. 

President Wood responded that he had listened to the con- 
cerns of Messrs. Seligman and Friedman. It was his view that they 
exaggerated the disruption done to the extension part of the opera- 
tion. Further, Mr. Cass will gain the capacity to become involved 
on a statewide basis in Labor and community development projects. 

Chancellor Tippo expressed reservations on whether Mr. 
Cass would have time for this, and the President responded that this 
was precisely why he was making the move: to relieve Mr. Cass of 
his geographical responsibility. 

After further discussion among members of the committee, 
the consensus was that the President should be free to make this 
decision, and that any appearance before the Board should be con- 
fined to a private session of the Executive Committee, and then only 
on an appeal basis. 

Chairman Healey stressed the fact that the University's 
representative in the Legislature should have a fully professional 
status on the University staff. 

At the invitation of Chairman Healey, Chancellor Tippo 
commented on agenda item four: Honorary Degrees . The Chancellor 
reported that the Faculty Senate at UM/Amherst had yesterday con- 
firmed its two representatives to the new Honorary Degree Advisory 



3633 



Executive 
10-16-70 



Honorary Degrees, 
UM/Amherst 



3634 



Executive 
10-16-70 



COMMITTEE 



SWAP Conference 



Faculty Senate 
Repr e s entat i on 
to Board of 
Trustees 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Committee which was established, last May. He expected that the 
group will meet shortly and bring names to the Executive Committee 
in the near future. 

Under Other Business, Chairman Healey and President Wood 
invited Secretary McCartney to comment briefly on a memorandum pro- 
posing certain procedural changes in Board of Trustees activities. 
The proposal embraced, among other things, a procedure for introduc- 
ing items to various agenda after proper administrative clearances^ 
also, the establishment of certain deadlines which would add to the 
convenience in receiving committee minutes and other Trustee docu- 
ments essential to orderly conduct of meetings. An equitable pro- 
cedure for regulating attendance at Trustee luncheons was outlined. 
Finally, the proposal presented a draft calendar of fixed committee 
dates for the ensuing academic year. 

The Secretary commented that the various proposals had 
been under consideration for some time and were intended to serve 
the convenience not only of the Trustees, but of the Administration 
as well. 

After some discussion, the proposals were considered 
favorably except doubt was expressed that it is realistic to fix a 
full calendar of committee dates for the entire year. It was agreed 
that the matter should be brought to the Board of Trustees for their 
consideration. 

Trustee Rowland commented that the SWAP Conference, slated 
for December 11 this year, is coming very close to the Christmas 
season which may prejudice Trustee attendance. The original date of 
November 20 was abandoned by the committee, Chancellor Tippo said, 
due to a conflict with Legislators Day. Mrs. Rowland queried 
whether the SWAP Committee might not be urged to reconsider its con- 
ference date and reschedule it just after the elections. 

President Wood stated that, when current phases of the 
administrative reorganization are completed, he will come back to 
the Board with further recommendations concerning the delegation of 
certain functions to the Chancellors. 

Chancellor Tippo reported on a meeting held, together with 
Secretary McCartney, with representatives of the Faculty Senate who 
pressed for inclusion of the Faculty Senate representative in the 
Trustee luncheon, as well as closed meetings as one way to reduce 
pressures to introduce a faculty member as a full member of the 
Board of Trustees. The Secretary indicated that Chairman Healey 
had already agreed to this. 

Trustee Gordon made a specific recommendation that the 
Board of Trustees or the Executive Committee have a meeting within 
the next month or so with the agenda devoted to the single item of 
review of the Master Plan, bringing together all documents related 
to this matter so that full and free discussion could occur. The 
Secretary was instructed to mail copies of the UM/Master Plan pro- 
posal to the Trustees. 



1 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

The meeting was adjourned at 10:^0 a.m. 




Robert J./McCartr 
Secretary, Board of Trustee 



3835 



Executive 
10-16-70 



II 



] 



3636 



COMMITTEE 



Capital Outlay 
Request —FY" '72, 
UM/Amherst 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS 
October 28, 1970, 1:30 p.m., Exeter Room, Hotel Lenox, Boston 

PRESENT : Committee Members and Trustee Staff : 

Chairman Haigis, President Wood; Trustees Chandler, 
Knowles, Maginnis, Pumphret; Treasurer Johnson, Secretary 
McCartney, Mrs. Hull 

Administrators, Faculty, Staff, and Invited Guests : 

From System Office : Vice President Phillips; Mr. Bush- 
Brown, Consultant 

From UM/Amherst : Chancellor Tippo, Mr. Littlefield; 
Professor Mario DePillis, representing the Faculty Senate 
UM/Amherst Master Planning Committee 

From UM/Boston : Vice Chancellor Hamilton; Messrs. O'Brien 
and Prince 

From UM/Worcester : Dean Soutter 

Also: Dean Belluschi, Architectural Coordinator 

From Sasaki, Dawson, DeMay Associates : Messrs. 

Sasaki and Alexander 

From the Bureau of Building Construction : Messrs. 

Kusack and McAdam 

From McKee, Berger, Mansueto, Inc . : Messrs. Armijo 

Cantrell, Malcolm, Rabin 

From Anderson, Beckwith and Haible : Messrs. Cory 

and Haible 

From Cambridge Seven Associates, Inc . : Messrs. 

Dietrich and Redman 

From Haldemann and Gorans son : Messrs. Goransson, 

Jacobovicz, Lyons 

From Charles T. Main, Inc . 



Mr. Battista 



Chairman Haigis convened the meeting at 1:14.0 p m. He 
introduced Professor Mario DePillis, newly elected Chairman of the 
UM/Amherst Faculty Senate Master Planning Committee. 

Capital Outlay Requests, Fiscal Year 1972, was the first 
agenda item taken up by the committee. 

President Wood noted that the problem, analyses, and pro- 
posals of each campus had been reviewed in the President's Office 
and that the individual requests had been considered in the overall 
view of a combined fiscal report. 

Capital Outlay FY '72 Priorities, UM/Amherst, were dis- 
cussed by Mr. Littlefield. Fourteen items were listed, totaling 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

$20,250,162. Detailed, background information and justification were 
provided for each item (Document T71-OJ+3 ). Listing is in the usual 
order, with those items classified as "emergency" first; current 
growth, second; long-range growth, third; and "early signals" for 
future growth, fourth. Items Al and A2 are considered in the emer- 
gency category. Al through A7 are considered absolutely essential, 
Mr. Littlefield said, if the University is to plan to accept stu- 
dents up to a 25,000 enrollment. He also noted the 1$% space defi- 
ciency under which the University at Amherst is currently operating. 

Capital Outlay Request FT '72, Medical School, was dis- 
cussed by Dean Soutter. (A full description of each Project Item 
requested is contained in Document T 71 -01+5 « ) The principal item, 
Dean Soutter said, is construction of a 250-person-capacity motel- 
type unit to serve the dual purpose. of student residence, and mini- 
mum-care facility for patients not requiring actual hospitalization. 
Estimates for construction are being looked at from both architec- 
tural and hotel management firms. Dr. Bush-Brown is to examine the 
proposed site. 

The Medical School administration, the Dean said, does not 
want to take Wigwam Hill land for student residences while funding 
of the hospital is still in doubt. It was pointed out during later 
discussion that need for the motel unit would also depend on the 
actual funding of the hospital. 

Other UM/Worcester items discussed included renovation 
and equipping of the Shaw Building, renovation (to meet safety 
standards) of six houses to be purchased as available to be used for 
student residences, land acquisition, and possible purchase of the 
old Post Office building to be used as a storage facility. Total of 
all UM/Worcester items requested: $5,782,321. 

It has been agreed, President Wood said, that specific 
UM/Worc ester items will be selected after further review by his 
office, in an amount not to exceed $5 million. The UM/Worcester CO 
request will then be interfiled with requests of the other campuses. 

UM/Boston Capital Outlay Request, FY '72, was presented by 
Mr. O'Brien. Covered in this request is Phase II development of the 
Columbia Point Campus, with full outline and details contained in 
Document T71-Ol4l. Amount requested: $°2,1|80,000. This appropria- 
tion would cover costs of Phase II development, the cost of design, 
construction and equipment for three academic buildings — College 030^ 
Building 120 — Physical Education facility not including the Inf orm- 
ary, and the second phase of the Science Building — 080(2). 

There was some discussion of the fact that in addition to 
the usual estimate to cover the costs of inflation and design and 
construction contingencies, a 10% allowance has been made to cover 
the probable costs of the "Boston Plan. " 

Mr. O'Brien especially noted that College 030 is one year 
later than originally planned as funds requested for FT '71 were not 



3837 



■? 



B & G 
10-28-70 



Capital Outlay 
Request FT '72, 
UM/Worcester 



Capital Outlay 
Request, FY '72, 
UM/Boston 

Document T71-014+ 



3638 



B & G 
10-28-70 



COMMITTEE 



Phase I, 
Development, 
Columbia Point, 
UM/Boston 



College 020, 
Columbia Point 



Approval — Final 
Working Drawings 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

appropriated, and that the Capital Request (but not the opening) of 
the second half of the Science Center is one year earlier than 
planned because of scheduling difficulties. The Physical Education 
facility has been moved ahead by four years in order to allow 
athletic activities during the construction phase of the campus. 

Charts had been prepared by Mr. O'Brien showing academic 
space projections per student at different stages of construction 
and, of particular interest to the committee, a chart showing com- 
parative costs and time of construction of major buildings at vari- 
ous state institutions in Massachusetts. Clearly shown was the fact 
that other designs are running to over two years, with UM/Boston 
designing major buildings in one year. "We have," Mr. O'Brien said, 
"developed a workable technique that would also work for other 
institutions in the Commonwealth. " There was general agreement that 
a major breakthrough had been achieved by UM/Boston in this request. 

Vice President Phillips noted here that it had been agreed 
that the UM/Boston budget request would be presented separately from 
the other University budget requests as a "fast track" item:. The 
UM/Worcester hospital, still an unresolved funding problem, will also 
be considered as a separate budget item. 

After further discussion, it was moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that they accept 
and approve the Fiscal 1972 Capital Outlay Requests as 
follows : 
UM/Amherst 

UM/Worcester — an amount not to exceed 
to be interfiled with 
UM/Amherst items and 
UM/Boston 

with the President's Office to have final review 
before presentation of the total $76,000,000 Capital 
Outlay Request to the Board of Higher Education. 



$17,000,000 
$ 5,000,000 



$£1|,000,000 



Development of Phase I — Columbia Point — was presented as a 
series of 15-minute slide shows by each of the three architectural 
firms working on the subject, with working drawings and program and 
cost information now subject to final approval. 

COLLEGE 020 



Architects: Cambridge Seven Associates, Inc . 

Presentation: Paul Dietrich 

Mr. Dietrich noted that the program approved had been 
adhered to and that the building budget was being met. (Prefinal 
estimate: $18,900,000.) He pointed out details of the design, not- 
ing especially the circulation pattern from a vertical spine, and 
open ceilings as an economic and design feature. 

Chairman Haigis and Trustee Knowles questioned the 



COMMITTEE 



I 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

emphasis on horizontal design in the fenestration of the building, 
which they felt gave the College an "industrial" look. Trustee 
Knowles also objected to the extensive use of glass in some areas of 
the building and the design and placement of windows. Mr. Dietrich 
noted that much of the design of the structure had been dictated by 
the acoustical engineering studies which, he said, had been strictly 
adhered to by all architects working on the project. 

Dean Belluschi observed that the perspective of College 
020 on display at the meeting did not do the building justice. It 
would, he said, be a "good building, relating well to the total 
design concept of the project." 

Mr. Sasaki pointed out that the actual building would have 
much more a feeling of height than was apparent in the drawing. 

After further discussion, it was moved, seconded and 

VOTED: To recommend to the Board of Trustees that the Program 
and Cost Information as detailed in Document T71-OU8 
and the Final Working Drawings — College 020 — Columbia 
Point be approved as submitted by the architectural f ink 
of Cambridge Seven Associates, subject to final approva. 
of the President's Office. 

Trustee Knowles is recorded in opposition. 

COLLEGE 010 

Architects: Haldeman and Goransson 



3639 



B & G 
10-28-70 



Presentation: Mr. Jacobivicz 

This building, it was noted, is very close to, but not 
exceeding the budget at an estimated figure of $18,982,877. Mr. 
Jacobovicz pointed out location of laboratory and classroom blocks, 
the swimming pool and other recreational areas, faculty and student 
dining rooms, the library, and other areas. He also commented 
briefly on both exterior and interior material and finishes. Actual 
samples of the exterior brick to be used in all buildings were on 
display. 

There was some discussion of the pool and its size and 
capacity, as well as the pros and cons of a separate dining area for 
faculty members. Chairman Haigis pointed out that the UM/Amherst 
faculty pays special dues for the maintenance of dining areas exclu- 
sively for faculty. He was, he said, "in favor of faculty eating 
with students." It was pointed out that the area set aside for 
faculty dining in College 010 would also serve for other functions. 



it was 



After further discussion, and on motion made and seconded, 



VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that the Program 

and Cost Information as detailed in Document T71-OU7 and 
the Final Working Drawings — College 010 — Columbia Point 



College 010, 
Columbia Point 

Approval — 
Final Working 
Drawings 



3640 



B & G 
10-28-70 




COMMITTEE 

Science Center 

080 

Columbia Point 

Approval — Final 
Working Drawings 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



be approved as submitted by the architectural firm of 
Haldeman and Goransson, at a sum not to exceed 
$18,982,877, subject to final approval by the Presi- 
dent's Office. 



SCIENCE CENTER 080 



Architects : Anderson, Beckwith and Haible 

Presentation: Mr. William Haible 

This building is very close to budget, Mr. Haible said, at 
$22,996,151. Difficulties in meeting the design and construction 
schedules were noted. Slides of an actual model of the building 
were shown as well as numerous slides of interiors of a MIT building 
done by the same firm, that are similar to those planned for the 
Science Center at Columbia Point. Especially noteworthy was the 
dramatic use of structural detail and graphic design as an integral 
part of these interiors in the building at MIT. 

Arrangement of space allotted to Botany, Chemistry, 
Physics, and Zoology were detailed, as were the layouts of the 
laboratory and service chases to serve these areas. A large sky- 
light through the building to plaza level is also a feature. The 
design of the Science Center was felt by the committee to be espe- 
cially commendatory. 

After discussion, it was moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that the Program 
and Cost Information as detailed in T71-Olj.9 and the 
Final Working Drawings — Science Center (080) — Columbia 
Point be approved as submitted by the architectural 
firm of Anderson, Beckwith and Haible, at a sum not to 
exceed $22,996,151, subject to final approval by the 
President's Office. 

The meeting was adjourned at lj.:35> p.m. 




;Cartney 
Secretary, yjoard of Trus"| 




COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON STUDENT ACTIVITIES 
November k, 1970, 10:00 a.m., Room 917, Campus Center, UM/Amherst 

PRESENT : Committee Members and Trustee Staff : 

Chairman Rowland, President Wood; Trustees Croce, Elters, 
Shaler; Secretary McCartney, Mrs. Hull 

Administrators, Faculty, Staff, and Invited Guests : 

From UM/Amherst : Chancellor Tippo, Dr. Bromery, Special 
Assistant for Student Affairs; Dean Field; Associate Deans 
Fitzpatrick and West; Professor John Roberts, Representa- 
tive of Faculty Senate; Dr. Barron, Master of Orchard Hill 
Residential College; Dr. Hunt, Master of Southwest Resi- 
dential College; From the Residence Hall Staff: Messrs. 
Wheeler and Davis; Messrs. Bigelow, Darland 



From the Student Senate UM/Amherst : 
President 



Miss Beharry, Vice 



From the Student Body, UM/Amherst : Misses Pepper, Stiles; 
Messrs. Buckley, Duban, Payton, Stewart, Tierney 



The meeting was convened by Chairman Rowland at 10:10 a.m. 

Security, UM/Amherst . President Wood, representatives of 
the UM/Amherst administration and residence halls staff, and student 
representatives all contributed along with Trustees to a lengthy 
discussion of the security problem on the campus at Amherst. 

Dr. Bromery pointed out that the other agenda items — Coed 
Dormitories; Visiting Rules; and Damage, Campus Center, were all 
interrelated and that discussion of these topics would of necessity 
overlap. 

Dr. Hunt, Master of the Southwest Residential College, 
said that, in his view, security problems in that area had remained 
rather consistent over the past few years. In any case, he said 
that he felt it would be wrong to connect any increases in offenses 
to the 21; -hour open -house regulations. 

Because of its size and architectural arrangements, Dr. 
Hunt continued, Southwest "is a sieve, especially on weekends — there 
is just too much anonymity for outsiders to be recognized." Dr. 
Hunt also cited the problems in parking lots "F" and "E" due to 
inadequate lighting and security personnel, where the incidence of 
automotive theft has reached serious proportions. 

Dr. Bromery noted the many difficulties arising from the 
inadequate number of security personnel. He particularly stressed 
the fact that residence halls are locked at 1 a.m. After that time 
a student wishing to enter a dormitory must find the security guard 
on duty in the area who may be in another building. A cut-back in 



3641 



Security, 
UM/Amherst 



3642 



Student Act. 
ll-U-70 



COMMITTEE 



Security — 
Open House 
Regulations 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

work-study funds has also affected the number of students working at 
desk duty. Security is better. Dr. Bromery said, in coed dorms, 
attributable to the presence of male students as residents of the 
dormitory. 

John Tierney, Greenough representative, said that the 
architectural arrangement of Greenough lent itself to a situation in 
which "everyone knows everyone else, and outsiders are easily 
spotted." However, even at Greenough, Mr. Tierney said, a theft of 
a color television set has occurred this year. 

Dean Field said that many of the thefts occurring in South- 
west were clearly the work of outsiders. In some cases quantities 
stolen indicated the work of obviously well-organized groups — 
probably from surrounding cities. He also noted the presence of a 
greater number of cars with a correspondingly high number of stereo 
tape decks on campus this year. Such items invite theft. The 
general increase in vehicular traffic also makes apprehension more 
difficult. 

Trustee Croce asked if University property and furnishings 
were properly stencilled and inventoried for identification pur- 
poses. There seemed to be general agreement that much equipment and 
furniture was not stencilled because of the general rush to furnish 
dormitories. Annual inventories are made, but it was agreed that 
these would serve no useful purpose in terms of the theft problem. 
Trustee Croce also asked if anyone were designated to have the 
responsibility for keeping track of each building's furnishings and 
to report losses. Dean Field replied that there were not enough 
maintenance personnel to assign to each building, but that he was 
sure that the custodial personnel would observe a "notable loss" and 
that it would be reported. 

There was discussion of the fact that many thefts have 
occurred in broad daylight, allegedly with persons looking on who 
thought the removal of the item was authorized. Trustee Croce 
strongly urged adoption of a badge system to provide identification 
of individuals authorized by the Physical Plant Department to 
rearrange or move out articles of furniture or equipment. 

Chairman Rowland asked if any dormitories were moving away 
from 2lj.-hour open -house regulations. David Cloisson, from Washington 
Upper, said that in this dormitory doors were to be locked at 10 p.m. 
The 2i|-hour open-house regulations, however, will still apply to 
visitors in the building before that time. 

Dr. Bromery, speaking in general terms of the security 
problem, identified the three main areas of concern: (l) thefts 
involving students only, (2) thefts from parking lots, and (3) theft 
by outsiders. The solution, he felt, lies in three fronts: (1) 
development of a sense of community, (2) better logistical use of 
security personnel^ and (3) use of outside consultants. A sufficient 
number of security personnel to cover dormitories after 10 p.m. is a 
necessity, so that students may easily and safely enter their own 



3643 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

residences after closing hours, Dr. Bromery said, adding that they 
must be protected from outsiders. 

President Wood asked what kind of system for reporting 
violations was now in effect and whether monthly summaries were made. 
Dean Field said in reply that the police logs were delivered to him 
daily by 8:30 a.m. These are handled on a day-to-day basis. Dr. 
Bromery also gets the reports from the Security Department. These 
reports, Dean Field said, are then sent to the appropriate channels — 
judiciary bodies, etc. Plans to publish the police and security 
reports in the Daily Collegian are being considered, Dr. Bromery said 

The President inquired, as to the amount of annual loss. 
This figure was given (for the most recent six -week period) as 
$17,563 for personal and state property (28$ personal, $h% state). 
Trustee Croce observed that the annual loss at this rate then would 
be about $1^0,000. 

President Wood asked for information on assaults and per- 
sonal injury — the area of greatest concern. Some of the more serious 
incidents involving threatened or actual assault were discussed. As 
lighting seemed to be a factor in many incidents, Chairman Rowland 
asked if there had been any improvement in illuminating the darker 
areas of the campus. It was stated that a new lighting system is 
being installed in the Central Area, and this is expected to be 
operational in about two .weeks. The Chairman asked if installation 
of this system could be expedited. 

Chancellor Tippo invited any students who had recently 
written about the security situation, either to the Trustees or the 
administration or through the Collegian, to address the committee. 
None of these students was present. 

Dr. Barron, Master of the Orchard Hill Residential College, 
said that the parking lots behind Orchard Hill were not sufficiently 
Lighted and were being increasingly vandalized. 

Provision of fencing, better lighting, and more security 
aersonnel for parking lots is being considered through an increase in 
the parking fee, Dr. Bromery said. Additionally, a proposal has been 
worked out which would provide for increases in security personnel 
Immediately, with further increases later on. The proposal would 
also provide for roving security guards on parking lots. 

Dr. Hunt expressed the belief that security is part of a 
Larger problem — the need for decentralization. 

Allan Davis, Head of Residence — Washington Lower, next 
spoke on the correlation between learning and living. Most other 
major universities are behind the University of Massachusetts in set- 
ting up residential colleges j also, in taking other steps to provide 
Living conditions related to students' life styles. "Students are 
Increasingly saying, " Mr. Davis said, "the real learning I do occurs 
where I live — not in a classroom." 



Student Act. 
ll-li-70 



3644 



Student Act. 
ll-U-70 



COMMITTEE 



Coed Dormitories 
IJM/Amherst 



Damage — Campus 

Center, 

IM/Amherst 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Trustee Croce asked, with all the emphasis on student life 
styles, why the students had not taken on responsibility for build- 
ings and furnishings. 

Dean Field pointed out that it had been necessary, for 
instance, to change existing University rules to allow students to 
paint and to other redecorating. Dr. Hunt described the complexitieE 
affecting life style which exist in the Southwest Area which has 102 
floors. 

Mr. Werbe, the library design consultant, Dr. Hunt said, 
has been assisting students on individual corridors to make changes 
in decorating, if funds can be found. Trustee Croce' s point, Dr. 
Hunt added, is very important. "Why don't people act responsibly to 
their environment?" The answer, he felt, is to create a sense of 
community, such as that of Greenough House,, 

President Wood said it would be very important that spe- 
cific proposals, as touched on at the meeting, be submitted to the 
Board of Trustees within the next few critical months. 

Mr. Stewart, representing Butterfield House, described 
changes made there since that residence hall has been coeducational. 
Two classes are now held in Butterfield, with more in the planning 
stages. The redecoration of the building is being used as a model 
for other dormitories. There is a developing sense of community, 
with minimal security problems. Strangers, he said, are identified 
and watched. 

Miss Pepper, of Greenough, said that she thought that a 
mistake was being made in discussing "only the positive dorms." 
Poor living conditions exist in other dormitories, she said, naming 
Baker House as an example. This residence hall, Miss Pepper said, 
is 9$% freshmen, with 35>0 male residents. It holds no house meetings 
and has no house government. Several students present felt that 
Baker's problem was due to the fact of its largely freshman makeup, 
"with no one to look to for leadership." 

Mr. Cloisson, of Washington Upper, expressed the feeling 
that there is too much separation between faculty and students, with 
faculty largely involved in the classroom situation and research 
activities. Miss Pepper, in this connection, said that she knew of 
some faculty members who worked with residence halls on their own 
time. It would be helpful, she said, if faculty time spent in a 
residence hall situation could be programmed into regular schedules. 

The Damage — Campus Center report was given by Mr. Bigelow 
of the Center's administrative staff. As of November 1 there has 
been a loss in the building of furnishings and equipment (exclusive 
of the Bookstore) of $6,000. The list of items stolen "runs the 
gamut, " Mr. Bigelow said, but the most popular item is lounge 
cushions. This loss has been sustained even with the services of a 
full-time security guard at the Campus Center. It was pointed out, 
however, that the Campus Center has sixteen exits and that one guard 
cannot adequately provide coverage. 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Mr. Tierney expressed the view that there was a prevailing 
"Robin Hood" attitude among students toward the Campus Center, which 
might explain some of the thefts. However, this would not, Chancel- 
lor Tippo pointed out, explain students stealing from other stu- 
dents. 

Mr. Duban of the Southwest Area spoke at the Chancellor's 
invitation on the general campus situation, which he saw as one of 
"cause and effect." There is, he said, a growing gap between the 
student and the institution. "If the student felt the institution 
cared about him, he wouldn't steal. Wo mutual respect is involved." 

Trustee Croce interjected that a student's respect for him 
self should be a paramount factor. Mr. Duban agreed that this was 
so at an individual level, but not at the level of prevailing student 
attitudes . 

To illustrate his view on the impersonality existing at 
the University, Mr. Duban said that, if a student felt like throwing 
paint on a building and if there was one professor inside that 
building who had shown concern for hin as a person, he would think 
of the insult to the person, and he would not deface that building. 
Mr. Duban has known two persons during his three years at the Univer 
sity who have shown great concern for students — one a dining hall 
supervisor who had made a point of getting to know the students eat- 
ing there. The other, a custodian in Moore House, "knows everybody.' 

Faculty involvement with students at a personal level is 
necessary, Mr. Duban continued. Some faculty members are afraid to 
take a too active interest in students as long as their professional 
advancement may be based on research and related activities. He sug 
gested that, if more incentive was provided to faculty members to 
become involved with students at a personal level, "this would fill 
the gap and solve many of the problems." 

Chancellor Tippo said that he could testify to the fact 
that faculty members working with residence halls were rewarded at 
merit increase time. The Administration had encouraged, he said, 
faculty involvement with students, admitting that "some do not do 
enough, and some departments do frown on involvement." He had asked, 
he said, at Convocation that each faculty member make an effort to 
get to know at least fifteen students on a personal basis. 

Discussion returned to the Campus Center and ways and 
means of dispelling rumor; also, ways and means of increasing stu- 
dent, participation in plans for development for the building. Dean 
Fitzpatrick noted the involvement of students in planning and oper- 
ating the building through the Student Union Governing Board. 
Changes in policy are being contemplated to relate the SUG Board 
more closely to the student body, he said. Trustee Elters felt that 
the SUG Board should be responsible to the Student Senate. 

Miss Beharry, Student Senate Vice President, said that the 
main problem of the Campus Center is the "newness" of the building. 



3645 



Student Act, 
ll-U-70 



Campus Center 



3646 



Student Act. 
ll-U-70 



COMMITTEE 



Coeducational 

Dormitories, 

UM/Amherst 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Time, she said, will change many of the current student attitudes. 
Similar situations have existed in the past with the Student Union 
and with the "pyramids" at Southwest, which were unpopular at first. 
Attitudes are changing already, Miss Beharry felt, in the two-month 
period in which the building has been in use. 

Mr. Tierney, for Greenough House, reported "fantastic 
cooperation" : a redecorating project carried out by students during 
the summer, a new guest room, library, dark room; also, a ceramics 
studio, pool table, a laundry. Security problems he described as 
"nonexistent." Living arrangements have created a close community, 
he said. 

Chancellor Tippo asked if this community spirit could not 
develop in non-coeducational dormitories. Mr. Tierney felt not. 
"The bonds are different," he said. "The relationships are differ- 
ent which exist between men and women in this kind of living 
arrangement." Greenough residents also felt, he added, that they 
would benefit from having an older faculty family living in the 
residence hall. 

Trustee Croce raised again the question brought up during 
the earlier discussion of coed dorms. "What do you do with the 
individual whose behavior is too far out of the norm to be accept- 
able? We cannot escape the fact of 'sick' people within our 
society," Dr. Croce said. The general answer seemed to be that peer 
group pressure was the most effective way of handling this type of 
situation. 

Mr. Davis, speaking for Washington Lower, noted the "con- 
trast between this year and last. Everyone knows everyone else 
this year." 

Mr. Stewart, reporting for Butterfield House, said that 
its residents urgently want freshmen in the House for the second 
semester. The students feel, he said, that an important part of the 
learning process takes place through contact between freshmen and 
upperclassmen. 

Discussion ensued on the fact that restrictions placed on 
freshman participation in coed dormitory arrangements had resulted 
in pooling of freshmen, with some undesirable results. 

Chancellor Tippo asked if there were any disadvantages to 
coed dormitory living. 

Miss Joanne Stiles of Gorman House commented on conditions 
in that residence hall (which is coeducational to the extent of one 
floor of girls sandwiched between several all -male floors) with a 
resulting ratio of four-to-one. "There is," Miss Stiles said, "much 
'zoo-like' behavior among the men students." She also implied that 
some Gorman residents had voted for a coed residence hall "for the 
wrong reasons." There are, she said, many unpleasant incidents and 
"girls hardly dare walk down the male corridors even in groups." 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Doubt was expressed by members of the committee and the 
administration that the girls should remain in this admittedly bad 
situation, which is aggravated by Gorman's location in a predomi- 
nately male dormitory area. Miss Stiles insisted, however, that 
there was some evidence that behavior was improving and that the 
girls felt that their continued presence could change the situation. 

In response to a question from Chairman Rowland, the stu- 
dents indicated their desire to have the University reconsider its 
policy in regard to freshmen in coeducational dormitories. 

The meeting was adjourned at 12:55 p.m. 




Robert J^/McCartney 
Secretary, Board of Trustee 




3647 



Student Act. 
ll-U-70 



3648 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



BLANK PAGE 



1 



COMMITTEE 



il 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

November 20, 1970, 10:30 a.m., Concord Room, Marriott Motor Hotel, 

Newton 

PRESENT : Committee Members and Trustee Staff : 

Chairman Healey, President Wood; Trustees Haigis, 
Pumphret, Rowland, Troy; also Trustees Chandler, Elters, 
Lambson, MacLeod, Maginnis; Treasurer Johnson, Secretary 
McCartney, Mrs. Hull 

Administrators, Faculty, Staff, and Invited Guests : 

From System Office : Vice President Phillips, Vice Presi- 
dent -Lashman, Mr. Cass 

From UM/Amherst : Chancellor Tippo; Dr. Bromery, Special 
Assistant for Student Affairs ; Professor Maida Riggs and 
Senior Class President Norman Patch, representing .the 
Advisory Committee on Honorary Degrees 

From UM/Boston: Chancellor Broderick, Vice Chancellor 
Hamilton 

From UM/Wbrc ester : Dean Soutter, Mr. Stockwell 

Chairman Healey .convened the meeting at 10:20 a.m. 

Honorary Degrees, UM/Amherst, was the first agenda item 
taken up by the committee. Professor Maida Riggs of the Physical 
Education Department and Senior Class President Norman Patch, repre- 
senting the Advisory Committee on Honorary Degrees, were present 
for this discussion. 

Chancellor Tippo noted that the new procedure related to 
selection of the Commencement speaker and other honorary degree 
recipients are now in effect. The Advisory Committee, consisting of 
two faculty members, two seniors, one representative of the Alumni 
Association, and the Chancellor, has met and considered all names 
submitted. A final list has been produced for consideration by the 
Executive Gommittee. Chancellor Tippo emphasized that the names 
being submitted by the Advisory Committee were clearly recommenda- 
tions only. 

After review by the Board the list of candidates, with pos 
sible additions and/or deletions, will be referred back to the 
Advisory Committee for comment before final selections are made. 
While there will be continuing dialogue between the Advisory Commit- 
tee and the Trustee Executive Committee, Chairman Healey pointed out 
that the Board has not delegated its authority in the conferring of 
honorary degrees and will have the ultimate responsibility for deci- 
sion in this important matter. 

The Executive Committee agreed on a list of Commencement 



3649 



Honorary 
Degrees, 
UM/Amherst 



3650 



Executive 
11-20-70 



Legislative 
Program ' 71 



COMMITTEE 



Special Trustee 
Meeting— "The 
Future of the 
University" 



Methane Gas 
Reports, 
Columbia Point 

Soil Settlement 
Reports, 
Columbia Point, 
UM/Boston 



"Boston Plan" 



Transfers — 
Subsidiary 
Accounts, 
UM/Wbrc ester 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

speakers and the order in which they should be approached. 

Legislative Program 1971 was reviewed by President Wood 
and Mr. Cass. The President detailed the work being done in the 
System Office in preparation for the forthcoming legislative session. 
Mr. Cass discussed the bills to be filed by the University. He dis- 
tributed a memorandum describing the proposed legislation. 

President Wood outlined the agenda for the special meeting 
of the Board to be held in Hyannis on December 28 and 29 on "The 
Future of the University. " The President ' s Office is preparing 
options and a l ternati ve f or tentative consideration by the Trustees 
at this most important meeting. Attendance is expected to be 
limited largely to Trustees, with Chairman Healey and President Wood 
deciding upon appropriate support staff to be present. 

Methane Gas Reports. Columbia Point (Documents T71-052, 
T71-053, T71-05U, and T71-055; were discussed by Vice Chancellor 



Hamilton These reports, as well as the Soil Settlement Reports 
(Documents T 71 -0£6, T71-057, and T71-058 ), which have just been 
received, have been completed and have been filed with the BBC, the 
Commissioner of Administration and Finance, and the Committee on 
Ways and Means. The reports are now being presented to the Board of 
Trustees. Copies were placed on file with the Secretary. It is the 
opinion of all parties concerned, Vice Chancellor Hamilton said, that 
all requirements of the law have been met on the methane gas situa- 
tion with the filing of these reports. Mr. Cusack of the BBC is to 
make a presentation during lunch at today's meeting on the resolution 
of this problem at the Columbia Point site. Installation of a pro- 
posed forced air induction and ventilation system is expected to cost 
about $1|00,000. Similar systems are in operation at other locations. 

Trustee Pumphret requested further information on "The 
Boston Plan" which has been discussed previously at Buildings and 
Grounds Committee meetings. In this connection, Vice Chancellor 
Hamilton noted that UM/Boston is attempting to find black con- 
tractors interested in working at Columbia Point. 

Transfers between Subsidiary Accounts, UM/Wbrcester, were 
next discussed. These reflect some items of an emergency nature and 
others to take care of future needs through June 30, 1971. 

After discussion, it was moved, seconded and 

VOTED: To recommend to the Board of Trustees that they approve 
the transfer of funds within the maintenance accounts 
of the Medical School, as listed below, in order to meei 
accumulated past obligations within the activities of 
the 03 and 16 accounts, which have no funds in their 
present balances. This results from equipment rental 
made necessary by delayed delivery of purchased equip- 
ment, use of temporary manpower during the opening of 
the school, payment of annual fees to consultants, etc 
Also, to anticipate additional transfers in all accounts 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

which will be needed through June 30, 1971, from accounts in which 
funds are available as a result of carry-overs from fiscal year 1970 
and program changes caused by delay of construction of the hospital: 



Transfers: from Account 01 to Account 
from Account 08 to Account 



03 
111 

from Account 10 to Account li| 
from Account 10 to Account 12 
from Account 10 to Account 16 



$101,000 

1U, 000 

l|,000 

15,000 

16,000 

$150,000 



Deficiency Budget Request — Security, UM/Amherst, was dis- 
cussed by Chancellor Tippo and Dr. Bromery, Special Assistant for 
Student Affairs. Chancellor Tippo noted that security problems were 
on the increase on the Amherst campus, as they are at other colleges 
and universities across the nation. He cited problems connected 
with accelerated growth and the use of larger and more complex 
buildings. There is a correspondingly greater need for additional 
security forces. 

Dr. Bromery reviewed plans for providing increased security 
on all fronts. He especially emphasized the need for providing more 
protection to the campus from outsiders. Parking lot thefts and van- 
dalizing have become a major problem, he said. Drug traffic is also 
increasing under cover of increased vehicular traffic. 

After further discussion, it was moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that they approve 
the Deficiency Budget Request for Security, UM/Amherst, 
as detailed in Document T 71 -059° 

Governance Proposal, UM/Boston, was next discussed by Chan 
cellor Broderick. The revisions suggested after previous review by 
the Executive Committee, and as outlined in a memorandum from Presi- 
dent Wood, have now been incorporated in the proposal (Document 
T70-061A). 



After review and discussion, it was moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that they approve 
the Governance Proposal, UM/Boston, as revised and 
detailed in Document T70-061A . 

Deficiency Budget Request, Library, UM/Boston, was also 
discussed by Chancellor Broderick. The present allocation barely 
covers commitments for periodicals in the present library, he said, 
without any allowance for the building of a library collection at 
Columbia Point. Details on the library request will be presented 
later on. 

Chairman Healey noted receipt of a letter from Mr. 0. 
Phillip Snowden pointing out that there are no black students in the 
present entering class at the Medical School and inquiring as to 



3651 



Executive 
11-20-70 



Deficiency 
Budget Request- 
Security, 
UM/Amherst 



Governance 

Proposal, 

UM/Boston 



Deficiency Budget 
Request, Library, 
UK/Boston 



Black Students, 
Medical School, 
UM/Worcester 



,-' 



3651 



Executive 
11-20-70 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

future plans for enrolling black medical students. 

In reply Dean Soutter said that it had been discovered 
last year that there were no black applicants for the Medical 
School. The Student American Medical Association had been con- 
tacted and asked to provide names of possible applicants for admis- 
sion. Only ten students were listed for Massachusetts; all of 
these were contacted and, of these, one applied but did not meet 
admissions standards. This year, Dean Soutter said, there are 
several black applicants. He hopes for improvement in the situa- 
tion in the future. 

Trustee Snowden commented on the absolute necessity for 
careful planning to meet the special needs of black students. 
Relying on "open door" policies, she said, simply does not work. 
The success of the Amherst CCEBS program, Trustee Snowden felt, is 
based on very careful and thoughtful planning. She termed the 
CCEBS program one of "the best college programs in the country." 

The meeting was adjourned at 1:0£ p.m. 





Robert J. l^bCartney 
Secretary, Board of Trustees \ 




COMMITTEE 



j 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON STUDENT ACTIVITIES 
December 12, 1970, 1:30 p.m., SWAP Conference, Oak 'n Spruce, 

South Lee 

PRESENT : Committee Members and Trustee Staff : 

Chairman Rowland; Trustees Chandler, Elters, Shaler. 
Also Trustee Abrams, Secretary McCartney 

Administrators, Staff, and Invited Guests : 

From UM/Amherst : Vice Chancellor Bromery; Deans Curtis 
and Field; Assistant Deans Fitzpatrick and West; Messrs. 
Darland and Forsythe 

For the Student Senate: Miss Beharry, Mr. Verrochi 

Also: Representatives of the SWAP Committee and SUG Board 



The meeting was convened by Chairman Rowland at 1:30 p.m. 

Dormitory Security, UM/Amherst, was the first agenda item 
discussed. Chairman Rowland noted that today's discussion is a con- 
tinuation of committee discussion of last month concerning campus 
security, open house regulations, and other aspects of campus living 
conditions. 

Dr. Bromery, Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs, 
UM/Amherst, reported briefly on the security situation. Extensive 
discussion has been held on campus, he noted, in the Student Senate, 
at the Chancellor's weekly coffee hours, and in the Collegian . 

The two main thrusts for solution to security problems Dr. 
Bromery sees as: (l) protection from outside intruders and (2) 
development of security measures internally from the students them- 
selves. Dr. Bromery outlined proposed measures for the protection 
of the campus from intruders which include an increase in security 
guard and police personnel. Also proposed is the use of residence 
hall assistants within the dormitories who would secure the building; 
at designated times and would then allow admission of residents and 
their invited guests. These residence hall assistants would be in 
contact with police cruisers in turn tied in with the officers on 
patrol by "walkie-talkie" equipment. The police cruiser, Dr. 
Bromery added, is to be equipped with fla.shing green lights for 
greatest visibility at all times. The main thrust of security mea- 
sures will be to provide highly visible, highly mobile deterrent 
factors for protection of the campus. 

Dr. Bromery also discussed the deficiency budget request 
which hopefully will be acted upon by the Legislature in January. 
Also, Dr. Bromery said, there is the possibility of obtaining federal 
funds for campus protection. All major universities, he noted, are 
facing similar problems. 



365: 



k^^>. 



Dormitory 
Security, 
UM/Amherst 



Student Act. 
12-12-70 



COMMITTEE 



Coeducational 

Dormitories, 

UM/Amherst 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Chairman Rowland noted that security had been a topic of 
discussion at the morning group meetings and suggested that specific 
suggestions from the SWAP Conference be submitted directly to Vice 
Chancellor Br ornery. 

Trustee Abrams raised the question of factors contributing 
to student frustration resulting in malicious damage to property or 
other destructive behavior. 

Trustee Elters noted that the Student Senate had initiated 
action on a committee to look into environmental causes of destruc- 
tive behavior, and that, as'' a result, the Faculty Senate was now in 
the process of forming a committee to study this problem. Seven 
students, he said, will be on this committee. Chairman Rowland 
observed that volunteer service by students on this, and similar, 
committees would denote student interest and support in finding 
solutions to the security problem and other problems of campus life. 

Dean Field observed that the entire SWAP Conference would 
provide much valuable feedback to the administration on diverse 
campus problems. 

Coeducational Dormitories, UM/Amherst, was next taken up bj 
the committee. 

Trustee Elters raised the question of the presence of 
freshmen in coeducational dormitories. The original restriction 
which did not allow freshmen residents in coed dorms, he felt, had 
been rational and valid in that it restricted participants to upper- 
classmen. Trustee Elters said that he felt this had been a reason- 
able precaution, but he felt that in practice it was unnecessary. 
He proposed that freshmen be allowed to live in coeducational dormi- 
tories, providing that the individual student and parents could come 
to an agreement. 

Trustee Chandler said that he felt that admittance of 
freshmen to coeducational dormitories would be taking a "logical 
step," from experience, and that he hoped this change could be 
implemented forthwith. 

Trustee Shaler also expressed agreement with the proposal. 

Dean Field commented on the difficulties which had arisen 
in connection with concentration of freshmen in some dormitories and 
the resultant loss of contact with upperclassmen. 

Vice Chancellor Bromery reviewed, for discussion, the 
original vote of the Board authorizing the establishment of coeduca- 
tional dormitories (of April 22, 1970) which is as follows: That 
the Greenough principles of coed living arrangements: (l) voluntary 
participation — all residents of a residence hall must agree before 
plans can be approved, (2) meetings of parents, students, and 
administrators must be held before plans can be approved, (3) writ- 
ten permission for those under 21, (Jj.) separate or segregated floors. 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

($) exclusion of freshmen from. the proposal, be applied to all coed- 
ucational residence hall proposals now under consideration and that 
details of implementation be left in the hands of the UM/Amherst 
administration. 

After further general discussion, motion was made and 
seconded and it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that part (5>) of 
the vote of the Board at its meeting of April 22, 1970. 
(as recorded on page 3328 of the permanent record of 
Trustee minutes) excluding freshmen from coeducational 
residence hall privileges, be rescinded so that such 
privileges be extended to members of the freshman class 
effective at the opening of the second semester of the 
academic year 1970-1971, with further details of imple- 
mentation left in the hands of the UM/Amherst adminis- 
tration. 

Discussion of alternate room versus alternate floor 
arrangements in coeducational dormitories followed. 

Mr. Verrochi commented that students desired an approxi- 
mation of living conditions as they exist "in the real world. " Most 
of us, he said, will live in apartments when we leave the campus, 
"where your next door neighbor may be male or female." He suggested 
looking to 1971, and the completion of dormitory suite units which 
would allow separate bathroom facilities for groups of students of 
either sex, and might be a way of the future. 

There was extensive discussion of the problem of separate 
bathroom facilities for men and women, and the difficulties which 
would arise in connection with this problem in some buildings. The 
need for more information upon which to base a possible recommenda- 
tion to the Board was stressed. 

Upon motion made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that they 
instruct the Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs, 
UM/Amherst, to report back to the February meeting of 
the Committee on Student Activities on the feasibility 
of removing the separate and segregated floor restric- 
tions, based on sex, in Coeducational Residence Halls, 
UM/Amherst. 

The Gorman House Report was presented by Assistant Dean of 
Students Michael West. Immediately f ollowing the last meeting of 
the Student Activities Committee, he said, several meetings had been 
held with Gorman House residents and area residence hall staff. Mr. 
West expressed the feeling that, while there had undoubtedly been 
incidents in Gorman (all of which had been handled satisfactorily), 
there had also been over-reaction on the part of some female stu- 
dents. 



3655 



Student Act. 
12-12-70 



Freshman 
Participation- 
Coeducational 
Dormitories, 
UM/Amherst 



Proposed 
Alternate Room 
Arrangements — 
Coeducational 
Dormitories, 
UM/Amherst 



Gorman House, 
UM/Amherst 



3656 



Student Act. 
12-12-70 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Programs are developing, Mr. West said, to provide for 
another corridor of "women at Gorman and to establish a greater sense 
of community within the dormitory These measures should alleviate 
many problems. 

The committee was advised that the Student Senate Finan- 
cial Policy Act has been retyped to incorporate suggested changes 
and will be distributed shortly. 

The meeting was adjourned at 2:5>0 p.m. 




Robert 
Secretary, 




/McCartney 
sard of Tru; 




COMMITTE6 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON FINANCE 
December ill, 1970, 3:30 p.m., President's Office, Boston, Mass. 

PRESENT : Committee Members and Trustee Staff : 

Chairman Pumphret, President Woodj Trustee Frechette 

Administrators, Faculty, Staff, and Invited Guests : 

From System Office : Vice President Phillips, Treasurer 
Johnson, Secretary McCartney, Mr. Cass, and University 
Counsel Broadhurst 

From UM/Amherst : Chancellor Tippo, Mr. Clay, Faculty 
Senate Delegate Ludtke 

From UM/Boston : Chancellor Broderick, Vice Chancellor 
Hamilton 

From UM/Wcrcester: Dean Soutter, Mr. Stockwell 



Chairman Pumphret called the meeting to order at 3:5>0 p.m. 

University Counsel Broadhurst was invited to present Agend; 
Item Two, Management and Services Agreements, UM/Amherst. 

Mr. Broadhurst explained the nature of the Management and 
Services Agreements. These are arrangements worked out between the 
Trustees and the University Building Authority, with or without con- 
sideration, to provide various services related to projects under- 
taken and completed by the Authority on request of the Trustees. 

Since the Authority works on a self -liquidating basis, the 
"consideration" in the past has consisted of whatever sums have been 
residual after the debt service, Trustee's fee, the rental fee of 
$1.00, and insurance have been met. There is a Management and Serv- 
ice Agreement between the Trustees and the University Building 
Authority for each project. The ones before us are the Twelfth and 
Thirteenth Projects, the Twelfth being the Warnecke Residence Halls 
on Eastman Lane, and the Thirteenth being the North Village Married 
Student Housing Project off North Pleasant Street. 

The only new aspect to the current Agreements is that they 
provide for a long-range reserve on maintenance and upkeep and for 
the investment of reserves in the objects which the statutes permit 
which are obligations of and guaranteed by the Commonwealth. 

Mr. Broadhurst recommended that the Management and Services 
Agreements for the Twelfth and Thirteenth Projects be adopted by the 
Board of Trustees at its meeting on December 21, 1970. Chairman 
Pumphret pointed out that there had been an earlier restriction pro- 
hibiting co-mingling of funds as between Projects One and Two and 
Project Three. More recently, Mr. Broadhurst has permitted addi- 
tional flexibility in the use of the funds, providing they are used 



365: 



■** 



Management and 
Services 
Agreements , 
UM/Amherst 



3658 



Finance 
12-1U-70 



COMMITTEE 



Twelfth and 

Thirteenth 

Projects 



Graduate School 
fee, UM/Amherst 



Trust Fund 

Budgets, 

UM/Boston 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

within the University Building Authority structures. 

Mr. Broadhurst reminded the Committee that the Authority 
cannot act unless requested to do so by the Board of Trustees; but 
once requested, it has all the powers of any other Authority of the 
Commonwealth to construct, to design, and to operate the building or 
buildings of a Project. The Management and Services Agreement, 
therefore, becomes a device for involving the Trustees and the Uni- 
versity in the operation of said Projects on an equivalent basis with 
its procedures for managing other University residence halls which it 
already owns. At the same time a legal separation is maintained 
between the funds utilized to construct such Projects, and the regu- 
lar State funds appropriated to the University. 

Treasurer Johnson stated that he had examined the Manage- 
ment and Services documents and found them in order, with the excep- 
tion of one or two minor typographical errors which will be corrected 

Mr. Broadhurst reported that his office would also have for 
the Trustees at their meeting on December 21, two leases : one for 
the land on which the Twelfth Project is located; the second for land 
on which the Thirteenth Project is located. The Authority pays rent 
on these in the amount of $1.00 per parcel. Each lease runs for 
forty years, with ten-year extensions. They terminate when the occu- 
pancy by the Authority terminates — which, in effect, will be when 
all of the Authority property becomes the property of the Common- 
wealth. 

Chairman Pumphret invited Chancellor Tippo to comment on 
Agenda Item One, Graduate School Fee, UM/Amherst . 

Dr. Tippo first noted a correction on the memorandum dis- 
tributed to the Committee on this subject, so that the requested 
increase in the Graduate Student Tax would read as follows: "from 
£0 cents per semester to $2.00 per semester, effective as of the 
Spring Semester, 1970-1971. " This correction will be reflected in 
the document when it is sent to the full Board of Trustees. 

The Chancellor noted that the increase to $1|..00 per year is 
intended to fund various activities of the Graduate School, and comes 
with the unanimous endorsement of the Graduate Student Senate. 

Chairman Pumphret indicated, in view of the unanimous 
recommendation by the Graduate Student Senate, that he would recom- 
mend this action to the meeting of the Board of Trustees at its 
meeting of December 21, 1970. 

The Chairman next turned to Agenda Item Three, Trust Fund 
Budgets, UM/Boston . He noted that the document issued to the Com- 
mittee from UM/Boston indicated a balance as of July 1, 1970, of 
approximately $2^,000 in the Research Trust Fund; whereas, the 
Treasurer's Quarterly Report for the same period had indicated a sum 
in hand as of the same date amounting to approximately $7,000. 
Treasurer Johnson responded that this balance was an actual balance, 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

plus projected income for the year. 

Mr. Pumphret queried the Treasurer as to whether the Trust 
Funds reflected in the Quarterly Report are reported together as 
among the various campuses, or whether they are separated. Mr. 
Johnson responded that, as of the date of the reoort in the Chair- 
man's hands, the funds were not segregated in the reporting process 
but have now been separated in terms of accounts, recognizing the 
reorganization of the University into a System with separate cam- 
puses. 

Vice Chancellor Hamilton reminded the Committee that the 
budget items listed total less money than is available in any of the 
Trust Funds listed. 

In similar vein, Chairman Pumphret questioned the balance 
of $20,000 listed as of July 1, 1970, in the Trust Fund Interest 
Account. Dr. Hamilton responded that Mr. Brand, by memorandum, has 
now provided an updated posting in this account. It was recommended 
that Mr. Brand's memo, updating both accounts, be entered into the 
minutes of the meeting. 

Chairman Pumphret indicated that he would be happy to 
recommend these transfers to the Board of Trustees on December 21, 
providing the updated balances in both accounts as of December 1, 
1970 (or the appropriate date) are made available to the Trustees in 
advance of the meeting. 

Under Other Business, the Chairman called for considera- 
tion of Budget Transfers, UM/Amherst, and Chancellor Tippo was 
invited to comment. 

The Chancellor said that the first item is a recommended 
transfer of $109,000 from Account 01 to Account 02. This request is 
occasioned by overtime requirements in both the Security and Physical 
Plant Departments. Approximately $£0,000 is requested for Security. 

Chairman Pumphret queried, after Trustees confirm such 
transfers, where notification of the action taken is recorded at the 
State House. Treasurer Johnson responded that notice goes to the 
Office of the Comptroller, where it is entered into the account 
books. It also goes to the Budget Bureau, so that a record is on 
file there. Mr. Cass then takes a copy to House Ways and Means Com- 
mittee so that any questions raised may be answered. 

Trustee Frechette joined the meeting. 

Trustee Pumphret commented that slightly in excess of 
2 percent of the budget was represented in the present transfer 
request, and he queried whether this should be done on a piecemeal 
basis. 

After discussion, it was agreed that the present time was 
appropriate for making such budgetary transfers. In response to 
query from the President, Chancellor Tippo reported that the total 
budget involved in subsidiary account transfers annually had been as 
follows: for the current year, 3»9 percent of the personnel budget; 



3659 



Finance 
12-lii-70 



Budget Transfers, 
UM/Amherst 



3660 



Finance 
12-U4-70 



COMMITTEE 



Syrian Antiochal 
Church Property , 
UM/Worcester 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

for the past year, 3.k percent. 

Treasurer Johnson observed that adequate documentation is 
on hand to explain the necessity for these transfers at the State 
House. 

Chancellor Tippo turned next to the requested transfer of 
$1*8,200 from Account 7^11-2000-03 to 7^11-2000-13. The original 
appropriation, for unknown reasons, had split up the $300,000 allo- 
cated to the Disadvantaged Student Program into the 03 and the 13 
accounts. The requested transfer will correct this. 

Discussion brought out the fact that the Disadvantaged 
Student Program involves not only black students, but other minority 
group representatives as well. Chancellor Tippo pointed out that, 
while the State has appropriated $300,000 for this program, approxi- 
mately $800,000 is obtained from outside sources. 

Under Other Business, the Chairman and President Wood 
invited Dean Soutter to comment on two items: purchase of land 
belonging to the Syrian Antiochal Church; also, acquisition of the 
old Worcester Post Office building. 

Dean Soutter said that the land belonging to St. George's 
Syrian Antiochal Church is adjacent to the current Medical School 
property. Negotiations for acquiring it have been in process for 
nearly five years. The site comprises 6.16 acres. The Medical 
School has assisted the Church in finding an alternate site for its 
building. 

Some time ago, three appraisals were made and the average 
of these was approximately $lj.2,000. However, the Church claims that 
it was involved in great difficulty because of the need to alter its 
architecture on a different site. They requested $100,000. 

In further negotiations, Dean Soutter suggested taking new 
appraisals on the land, which he feels is not as valuable as the 
Church interests claim because of restrictions which confine its use 
to that of church property. 

Three new appraisals were obtained, one from a firm in 
Worcester at $69,500; two others were obtained from Springfield firms 
one at $1±9,000 and another at $50,000. "This disparity is hard to 
reconcile," Dean Soutter said. 

Dean Soutter' s suggestion is that the University now offer 
the average of the three latest appraisals which amounts to $56,200. 

After further discussion, and in view of the fact that this 
matter had been considered previously by the Committee on Buildings 
and Grounds with a clear understanding that the Administration was to 
proceed with negotiations, Chairman Pumphret indicated that he would 
recommend this matter to the Board of Trustees at its next meeting 
after consultation with the Buildings and Grounds Committee. 



3661 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Dean Soutter turned, finally, to an item which he termed 
"of some -urgency." Last September, the Medical School was offered 
the old Post Office building adjacent to the railroad station in 
Worcester. The property now belongs to the General Services Admin- 
istration. This agency is empowered to give the installation to an 
educational institution if it is to be used for educational pur- 
poses; otherwise, it must be sold. 

The Medical School is contemplating use for storage of 
items and equipment which could be purchased for the Medical School, 
avoiding escalation of costs which would apply at a later date. 

The area consists of 50,000 square feet. It is a well- 
constructed building; has good unloading docks, and has a furnace 
which is presently inoperative. The intention is to use it for dead 
storage during the winter months, and as a staging area for the 
assembling of certain Medical School equipment which requires test- 
ing before installation during the frost-free months. 

GSA requires that the Medical School have a thirty-year use: 
for the building; the Medical School envisions forty-year use. 
Eleven thousand dollars will be required to put the building into 
acceptable shape. Annual operating costs would approximate $22,5>00. 

The cost of other facilities for storage priced out in the 
Worcester area runs somewhat as follows: 33? 000 square feet, no 
utilities at $26,1|.00; roughly the same area, $72,000; lease of the 
Butler Building for a ten -year period would be $105,000 annually. 

Dean Soutter concluded that the offer of the Post Office 
building represents a real bargain. 

President Wood queried whether, in the full outline of the 
Sasaki plans for the Medical School campus, any storage space is pro 
vided. The answer was negative. It may be anticipated, therefore, 
that the building would have continuous use for storage purposes. 

After further discussion, and on expression by President 
Wood that he was attracted to the proposition on its "no-cost" basis, 
Chairman Pumphret indicated that he would recommend to the Board of 
Trustees that the building be acquired. He cautioned, however, that 
operating and maintenance costs must be anticipated for the future 
if the Medical School is to utilize the facility. 

The meeting was adjourned at k'-k5 p.m. 



Finance 
12-1U-70 




lobert 
Secretary, B 



eCartney 
d of Truste 




3662 



Executive 
12-21-70 



COMMITTEE 



Dr. Vernon 
Alden, Chrmn. , 
President' s 
Advisory 
Committee on 
the Future 
University 



Honorary 
Degrees, 
UM/ Amherst 



Personnel 
Matter 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 
December 21, 1970, 10:30 a.m., Hawthorne Room, Parker House, Boston 

Present: Committee Members and Trustee Staff : 

Chairman Healey, President Wood; Trustees Boyden, Gordon, 
Haigis, Rowland; Also Trustees Maginnis, Shaler; Treasurer 
Johnson, Secretary McCartney, Mrs. Hull 

Administrators, Faculty, Staff, and Invited Guests : 

From System Office : Vice President Phillips 

From UM/Amherst : Chancellor Tippo; Representing the 
Faculty Senate, Professor Howards 

From UM/Boston : Chancellor Broderick, Vice Chancellor 
Hamilton, Dean Hoopes 

Chairman Healey convened the meeting at 10:50 a.m. 

President Wood introduced to the meeting the newly named 
Chairman of the President's Advisory Committee on the Future Univer- 
sity, Dr. Vernon Alden, and his assistant, Mr. Thomas Gee. 



Honorary Degrees, UM/Amherst , were discussed. The selec- 
tion of honorary degree recipients was agreed upon informally. The 
usual procedure is being followed, in that the list is to be held in 
complete confidentiality until those involved have been invited and 
names are made public. The list will be confirmed finally by formal 
vote at an executive session of the Board of Trustees on January 29, 
1971. 

A personnel matter was also discussed by the committee. 

The meeting was adjourned at 12 noon. 




Robert J. /McCartney 
Secretary, Board of Trustees 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF SPECIAL MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON 

BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS 

December 21, 1970, 11:45 a.m., Hawthorne Room, Parker House, Boston 

PRESENT: Committee Members and Trustee Staff : 

Chairman Haigis, President Wood; Trustees Chandler, 
Frechette, Greenblatt, Lambson, Maginnis, Pumphret; 
Treasurer Johnson, Secretary McCartney, Mrs. Hull 

Administrators, Faculty, Staff, and Invited Guests : 

From System Office : Vice President Phillips 

From UM/ Amherst : Chancellor Tippo; Dr. Gage; Messrs, Clay 
Littlefield, Ryan 

From UM/Boston : Chancellor Broderick, Vice Chancellor 
Hamilton: Mr. O'Brien 

From Jackson and More land : Messrs. Davidson, McGee 

From Goody and Clancy : Messrs, Clancy, Pelletier 



The meeting was convened by Chairman Haigis at 12 noon. 

Preliminary Plans--Inf irmary Addition, UM/Amherst, were pr|e 
sented for approval by Mr. Littlefield and the representatives of 
the architectural firm of Goody and Clancy. Severe restrictions of 
the site dictate a functional design for the addition, but the de- 
sign will be compatible with the main infirmary building. 

Mr. Clancy indicated that his estimate of the contractor's 
bid in December 1969 would have been $980,000 and projected forward 
at 1%% per month that this bid in September 1970 would have been 
$1,129,925. 

After discussion, and on motion made and seconded, it was 



VOTED: To recommend to the Board of Trustees that they approve 
the preliminary plan for the first two floors plus 
service core (Stage I) of the Infirmary Addition, UM/ 
Amherst, as presented by the architectural firm of Goody 
and Clancy at a total project cost of $1,368,000 based 
on December 1969 construction costs and subject to the 
availability of BBC inflationary contingency funds. 

Progress Report Renderings — Tillson Farm Power Plant , 
UM/Amherst, were also presented for review. Representatives of the 
engineering firm of Jackson and Moreland reviewed site plans and 
building elevations for the committee. The design of the building 
is essentially that of a large rectangular block building housing th 
power plant. An aesthetically pleasing effect has been suggested by 



3663 



Buildings 
and Grounds 
12-21-70 



Approval-- 

Preliminary 

Plans (Stage I) 

Infirmary 

Addition, 

UM/Amherst 



Progress 
Review- - 
Tillson Farm 
Power Plant, 
e UM/Amherst 



3664 



Buildings 
and Grounds 
12-21-70 



COMMITTEE 



Progress Report, 
Columbia Point, 
UM/Boston 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

the designers through the use of translucent panels as siding. These; 
panels will allow daylight conditions to prevail in the interior dur 
ing the day and will also allow the operating lights to show through 
the sidewall of the building at night. 

The capability of these panels to resist vandalism was dis- 
cussed, although the material to be used is acrylic and is easier to 
repair and much less fragile than glass. The designer is to compare 
the cost, appearance, and durability (resistance to vandalism) of 
other exterior sidewall material; i.e., brick, etc. 

Progress Report — Columbia Point, UM/Boston , was presented 
by UM/Boston Planning Officer O'Brien. 

Mr. O'Brien presented information on the foundation bids 
for five buildings; also, on the low-grade work including (1) utili- 
ties, pumphouse, and dike; (2) progress on the bus station; and (3) 
non-progress on the promenade roads, walks, landscaping, and site 
furnishings including lighting standards. 

On the first item, bids have been opened for foundation 
work for the service building, administration building, and science 
building and the two colleges. (The library building contract was 
awarded in September but execution was delayed pending completion of 
methane studies. The library foundation work came in under budget.) 

The foundation bid for the other buildings totaled 
$4,195,415 against a budget amount of $4,250,000. The bid is one and 
a fraction precent under budget. However, Mr. O'Brien said it should 
have come in about 3 percent under the budget amount in order to 
allow comfortably for change. 

The bid for below-grade site work including utilities, 
pumphouse, dredging, and rock for the dike came in at $5,400,000, 
very comfortably below the budget amount of $7,000,000. (The first 
rough site grading contract last summer (work on which is now com- 
plete) also came in under budget. 

Bus station schematics have now been prepared in accordance 
with the Board of Trustees vote of June 24, 1969. This work will be 
reviewed by Belluschi, Sasaki, Dawson, and DeMay and brought before 
the Buildings and Grounds Committee as soon as possible, hopefully 
at the next meeting. The drawings were available for review by inter 
ested members. 

Mr. Haigis commented on his concern for a satisfactory 
aesthetic treatment, particularly the plaza level and above, and the 
lighting within the structure, particularly below plaza level, since 
night classes will be held there. The subcommittee had previously 
requested more information on the promenade (where the land meets 
the sea) and general landscaping. This contract is scheduled to go 
out approximately in March 1971. However, the site engineers were 
not ready with a satisfactory completion. Hopefully, the work will 
be ready for the next meeting of the Committee on Buildings and Grounds 



1 



COMMITTEE 



I 



1 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Vice President Phillips reported to the committee that the 
University Fiscal 1972 Capital Outlay Request for the Amherst campus 
would equal $19,320,162 for eleven items instead of the $17,145,162 
for seven items specifically voted by the Trustees on November 20, 
1970. He noted that in the Buildings and Grounds meeting of October 
28, 1970, and at the full Board meeting of November 20, 1970, the 
entire fourteen-item request totaling $20,750,162 for UM/ Amherst had 
been reviewed by the Board. He felt that a revision in the request 
should be made to emphasize the importance of these next four items 
(equipment, renovations, Marine Science and Ocean Engineering, and 
Design of Additional Health Services Facilities // Stage II of the 
Infirmary Addition// ) even though they could not receive the same 
urgent priority classification of the first seven items. 

It was then moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that the Capital 

Outlay Budget Request for Fiscal Year 1972 for UM/Amhers 
be amended to include an additional four items as follow 
Equipment, $1,000,000; "Room by Room" Renovations, 
$800,000; Marine Science and Ocean Engineering, $300,000 
and Design of Additional Health Services Facilities 
(Stage II of the Infirmary Addition), $75,000, for a 
total additional request of $2,175,000. 

The meeting was adjourned at 12:25 p.m. 



3665 



Capital Outlay 
Request FY '72, 
UM/ Amherst 




Osi/L 

Robert J/. /McCartney 
Secretary, B.o4rd of Trust 




3666 



Finance 
12-21-70 



COMMITTEE 



Murray D. 
Lincoln Estate, 
Investment of 
Funds 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF SPECIAL MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON FINANCE 
December 21, 1970, 3:40 p.m., Hawthorne Room, Parker House, Boston 

PRESENT: Trustees and Trustee Staff : 

Chairman Pumphret; Trustees Gordon, Rowland; Treasurer 
Johnson, Secretary McCartney, Mrs. Hull 

From System Office : Vice President Phillips 

From UM/ Amherst : Chancellor Tippo, Mr. Clay 

From Standish, Ayer, Wood, Inc .: Mr. Ladd 

The meeting was convened by Chairman Pumphret at 3:40 p.m. 

Treasurer Johnson, noting that the Murray D. Lincoln Estate 
is now in final stages of settlement, pointed out the necessity for 
planning now for investment of these funds as soon as they become 
available. The Trustees of the Estate, he said, have requested our 
advice on funds that will soon be transferred to the University. 

Mr. Ladd, representing Investment Counsel, reviewed for the 
committee his firm's proposed program of investment for the funds 
from the Estate. His recommendations are for (1) $30,000 in cash no^ 
being distributed from the Murray Lincoln Trust and (2) a later dis- 
tribution of $150,000, both of which are to go to the University of 
Massachusetts Endowment Fund. 

The committee discussed present holdings and the recommended 
investments. Mr. Ladd is to report back before the next meeting on 
the advisability of retaining Northwest Airlines stock. Some reser- 
vations were also expressed about investing in Kimberly Clark. 



was : 



After further discussion and upon motion made and seconded, it 



VOTED: To authorize 

the Treasurer of the University, Kenneth W. Johnson, to 
execute the following changes in the University's invesi 
ment portfolio as recommended by Standish, Ayer and Wood, 
Inc. : 



5ow 
iold 



20M 
20M 
20M 

147 
700 
700 



Buy 
5M 
5M 
5M 



Issue 
G. M. A. C. 
Gulf Oil 
Shell Oil 



4 5/8 6/15/86 
5.35 6/15/91 
4 5/8 8/ 1/86 



53 E. I. duPont (5.00) 
300 Northwest Airlines (0.45) 
200 U. S. Plywood $1220 ev. pfd. 



Price 
70 
85 
78 

128 
19 
28 



Market 

$ 3,600 

4,250 

3,900 

6,784 
5,700 
5,600 



Resulting 

Income Holding 

$ 231 18,000 

268 21,250 

231 19,500 



265 
135 
240 



25,600 
19,000 
25,200 



COMMITTEE 



Buy 
25M 


Issue 








Fed'l Inter 


5 


95 


7/ 1/74 




Credit 








25M 


National Lead 


8 


s? 


12/15/95 


600 


American Natural 
Gas 






(2.10) 


300 


Eastman Kodak 






(1.32) 


800 


Kimberly Clark 






(1.20) 


300 


Xerox Corp. 






(0.80) 



1 



1 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

It was also 

VOTED: To recommend to the Trustees of the Murray D. Lincoln 

Trust that they invest the $150,000.00 they now hold in 
cash in the following securities that the Trustees of 
the University of Massachusetts will be pleased to 
accept into their endowment portfolio on termination of 
the Trust. 

Price Market Income Yield 



100 $ 25,000 $1,488 5.957« 
100? 25,000 2,000 8.00 
42 $ 25,200 $1,260 5.007, 



73 


21,900 


396 


1.92 


31 


24,800 


960 


3.87 


88 


26,400 


240 


0.91 



$148,300 $6,344 



The Treasurer also discussed Insurance Coverage, Universi 
Motor Vehicles, 1971 . 



ty. 



The only bidder for the Personnel Protection 
Policy was the Francis P. Lyons Agency of Northampton, representing 
the Lumberman's Mutual Insurance Company, the present carrier. The 
bid premium is up substantially over 1970 due principally to an 
increase of 51 vehicles above the 1970 schedule and a high loss rati 
for 1969, in addition to the general rise in rates. 



It was agreed that Treasurer Johnson would analyze the covfer 
age involved and provide a memorandum on this information. A binder 
will be placed on the existing policy as of January 1, 1970, pending 
further consideration of this matter at the next meeting of the com- 
mittee. 

The meeting was adjourned at 4:05 p.m. 




;rt 
Secretary, 



[cCartne 
rd of Truste 




3667 



Finance 
12-21-70 



Insurance 
Coverage, 
University 
Motor Vehicles, 
1971 



3668 



Buildings 
and Grounds 
1-15-71 



COMMITTEE 



UM/Amherst-- 
Additional 
Residence 
Halls, 1972 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS 
January 15, 1971, 10:30 a.m., The Old Mill, Westminster 

PRESENT: Trustees and Trustee Staff : 

Chairman Haigis; Trustees Chandler, Crowley, Lambson, 
Knowles, Maginnis, Pumphret; Treasurer Johnson, Secretary 
McCartney, Mrs. Hull 

Administrators, Faculty, Staff, and Invited Guests : 

From System Office : Vice President Phillips 

From UM/ Amherst : Mr. Littlefield, Director of Planning 

From UM/Boston : Chancellor Broderick, Vice Chancellor 
Hamilton; Mr. O'Brien, Director of Planning 

From UM/Worcester : Mr. Stockwell, Associate Dean for 
Administrative Affairs 

From the BBC : Mr. Cusack 

From McKee, Berger, Mansueto : Mr. Cantwell 

From Charles T. Main Co .: Messrs. Austin, Gervais, 
Mastrobattista, Pollari 

The meeting was convened by Chairman Haigis at 10:40 a.m. 

Additional Residence Halls, 1972--UM/Amherst , was discussed 
by Mr. Littlefield. It is proposed that the University of Massachu- 
setts Building Authority be requested to conduct a feasibility study 
for a program which would provide housing for 600 single students in 
small, 50-student-capacity residence halls by the fall of 1972. 

This program is based on the Sasaki Housing Survey, which 
was informally studied by the Board at the special meeting in Hyanni 
and takes into account projected housing needs as well as student 
preferences as expressed in the report. Cooperative living arrange- 
ments, for instance, were one such preference listed by students. 
The type of residence being proposed would be adaptable to cooperative 
living if this seemed desirable at any time in the future. It was 
stressed that the program would be both flexible and experimental, 
and that its small size would permit possible completion within an 
18-month period, while future long-range housing needs are studied 
in more detail. 

The cost objective of the residence hall construction pro- 
gram, Mr. Littlefield said, is set at $6,100 per student, exclusive 
of kitchen and dining facilities. Funding would be within the tra- 
ditional financial arrangements. Committee members felt that the 
maintenance and operating costs should be looked at very carefully 
with a view to minimizing these costs, and that a study should be 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

made of comparative costs of operation of small vs. large dormitories. 

Mr. Littlefield pointed out that the proposed program would 
be compatible with planned gradual deceleration of the rate of growtn 
of the University in Amherst. 



After further discussion, it was moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that the Univer- 
sity of Massachusetts Building Authority be requested 
to conduct a Feasibility Study—Additional Residence 
Halls, 1972--UM/ Amherst, as detailed in Document T71-06(4. 

A Proposed Change in Architectural Plans — Phase II — Grad - 
uate Research Center was also reviewed by Mr. Littlefield. Drawings 
showing a change in fenestration from original plans for the two 
remaining towers were displayed for the committee. The proposed 
change, while substantial, reflects the function of these buildings 
as primarily office space. It would provide better and more pleasanjt 
lighting for occupants of the building; it is also in harmony with 
the fenestration of the lower section of the complex. Dean Belluschi 
has approved the plans as a "better solution." The change, Mr. Little- 
field said, can be made within existing costs. 

After further brief discussion, it was moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that they approve 
a change in fenestration for Phase II— Graduate Researc 
Center, UM/ Amherst, as presented by the architectural 
firm of Campbell, Aldrich and Nulty. 

A Situation Report— Post Office Building, Worcester , was 
presented by Mr. Stockwell, He reviewed the detailed studies which 
have been made on acquisition of this building. In particular, the 
Medical School is anxious that it not become a "white elephant." On 
the basis of studies made, the Medical School administration recom 
mends formal acquisition of the property. 

An $11,000 repair and renovation budget, Mr. Stockwell 
said, will take care of necessary repairs, including a $6,500 item 
for work on the boiler to provide the minimal heat necessary for 
storage. Assurances have been given by the City of Worcester that 
the building will not be affected by urban renewal in the foreseeablje 
future. 

Vice President Phillips noted that Mr. Cass is checking 
into the possibility of any legislative action which might be neces' 
sary in regard to acquisition of this property. 

On motion made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that final approvla 
be granted for acquisition of the old Post Office Build 
ing in the City of Worcester by the University of Mas- 
sachusetts Medical School. 



Buildings 
and Grounds 
1-15-71 



UM/Amherst- 
Graduate 
Research 
Center, 
Phase II 

Changes in 
Plans 



UM/Worcester 

Acquisition 

of Post 

Office 

Building, 

City of 

Worcester 



3670 



Buildings 
and Grounds 
1-15-71 



COMMITTEE 



UM/Worcester-- 

Land 

Acquisition 



UM/Worcester — 
Shaw Building 
Renovation, 
Phase II 



UM/Worcester-- 
Hospital Bill 



UM/Boston-- 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Mr. Stockwell also presented a Report--Land Acquisition , 
UM/Worcester . Under negotiation are parcels of land in the followin 
locations: (1) approximately 6 acres owned by the Syrian Antiochal 
Church at the junction of Plantation and Belmont Streets; (2) land 
parcels that are part of the original 76-acre site plan of Sasaki, 
Dawson and DeMay, considered to be the logical site for housing; 
(3) 40 acres of land from the Sisters of Notre Dame de Namur, west 
of Wigwan Hill; and (4) scattered land parcels on Wigwam Hill taken 
over by the City of Worcester for nonpayment of taxes, totaling 8.3 
acres . 

Mr. Stockwell noted that the Medical School is anxious to 
purchase as much of Wigwam Hill as possible and to avoid having the 
Trustees exercise their right of eminent domain. Acquisition to a 
total of 300 acres of land, Mr. Stockwell said, is the long-range 
goal. 

Treasurer Johnson added the details of the 17 parcels of 
land on Wigwam Hill that the City of Worcester holds on tax judgment 
The City is willing to turn these over to the University under the 
state law authorizing such transfers of tax holdings. 

After further brief discussion, it was moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that authority be 
granted to proceed with land acquisition from the City 
of Worcester of the seventeen parcels of land on Wigwam 
Hill totaling approximately 8.3 acres. 

Reporting on Phase II of Shaw Building Renovation, UM/Wor - 
cester, Mr. Stockwell said that the bids were in at slightly above 
appropriation. However, the BBC hopes to provide additional funds 
needed for the air conditioning and other essential features of the 
renovation. A six-month construction period is anticipated. It was 
pointed out by Chairman Haigis that the Shaw Building will remain 
useful to the Commonwealth for a considerable time into the future. 

Mr. Stockwell noted that the Hospital Bill has been signed 
by President Nixon. Mr. Lashman is looking into the amount of funds 
which will be available to the University of Massachusetts Medical 
School. He added, however, that reduction had been made in the 
amount of funds available and that these funds would have to be 
divided among requests received from all over the nation. 

Reporting for UM/Boston, Mr. O'Brien summarized the overal 
costs to date for the Columbia Point site. In general, he said, the 
history of estimates against bidding has been very good, with most 
bids coming in very close to or under the estimates. Chairman Haigi|s 
commended all those involved for their close adherence to budget 
figures. He stressed the importance of all estimates, particularly 
those of architectural firms, remaining at or close to budget, as a 
"matter of responsibility to the Commonwealth." 

Reviewing the Transit Situation—Columbia Point, UM/Boston 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Vice Chancellor Hamilton noted that it is still necessary to plan fcjr 
a bus terminal, as there is no certainty that a transit connection t|o 
the campus will materialize. There is the possibility of a Depart- 
ment of Transportation capital grant to the MBTA, but there are no 
commitments at present. Cost estimates on the bus terminal have com 
in over budget and are now in the process of being reworked. 

The Sitework and Dike Report—Columbia Point, UM/Boston , 
was presented, after a recess for lunch, by Mr. O'Brien and repre- 
sentatives of the Charles T. Main Co. Presented for comparison were 
drawings of the Master Plan by Belluschi, Sasaki, Dawson and DeMay, 
and the present site design by the Charles T. Main Co. Site propo- 
sals for Phase I, showing landscaping, roads and walks, and benches 
and lightling standards were also discussed. 

Of particular concern to the committee was the design of 
the dike section as shown in the Master Plan, as compared with the 
dike design of Charles T. Main. The CTM design is basically a half- 
section of dike at the northeast end vs. a full-section in the Maste 
Plan. Also, in the Master Plan, the dike follows the shorelines 
whereas the CTM plan is in straight alignment. This latter change, 
however, has been dictated by requirements set forth by legislative 
action. 

The CTM dike plan, as described by Mr. Mastrobattista, 
would have the appearance of a full dike. The change in design to a 
half, rather than a full-section, would effect a savings of approxi- 
mately one-third the cost of the Master Plan design and would be mor 
feasible when the settlement factor is considered, Mr. Mastrobattist 
said. 

In response to questions as to storm damage (of particular 
concern to Trustee Knowles) , the CTM engineers said that their desig|i 
"would provide protection against all but the worst storms". Mr. 
O'Brien felt that the dike as designed by Main, "would be occasionally 
overtopped but washout would be negligible." Even the "one hundred 
year storm," Mr. O'Brien felt, would not endanger the buildings. 

There was agreement, however, that the Sasaki Master Plan 
dike did provide the best possible protection against storm damage. 

The problem of unequal settlement was also discussed exten 
sevely. The CTM representatives felt that stability should be a 
decisive factor, and that the risk of settlement and resultant crack- 
ing of a full-dike section, if constructed now, should be considered 

Mr. Cusack of the BBC said that the three factors consider^ 
in relation to dike construction had been cost, settlement, and need 
also, that further studies would be made on points raised by the 
committee . 

The pumphouse design was also extensively discussed. 
Chairman Haigis expressed particular concern over the safety factor 
involving use of the waterfront site by the public. He was expecia'.ly 
concerned with proper screening and protective fencing of the pump- 
house intake area. Mr. Cusack said that a report will be made on the 



3671 



Buildings 
and Grounds 

UM/Bos ton- 
Transit 
Situation, 
Columbia Point 



UM/Boston— 
Sitework and 
Dike Report, 
Columbia Point 



3672 



Buildings 
and Grounds 
1-15-71 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

actual velocity of water at the intake to the pumphouse. 

A special report will be made to the committee, at Trustee 

Knowles' request, as to the feasibility of incorporating the curved 

top section of the dike as shown in the Sasaki Master Plan, with the 
CTM half-section of dike. 

Mr. Pollari, For CTM, reviewed details of landscaping and 
fixtures. Exposure to salt spray and other seaside conditions dic- 
tates much of the choice of plant species. Northern red oak. rubirosa, 
and juniper are among the landscaping materials planned. The juniper 
will provide a strong, low band of greenery adjacent to paved areas 
and walkways suggested in the Master Plan. 

Treasurer Johnson questioned the choice of lighting stan- 
dard made by CTM and asked why the specially designed "University 
of Massachusetts Light," designed by Sasaki to be vandal-proof, had 
not been used. This matter will be checked into, although Mr. 
Pollari felt that the design of the lamp post chosen was "better 
architecturally. " 

Mr. O'Brien suggested the possibility of reducing the road 
way from three lanes to two in order to reduce the amount of paving 
within the limited area of the site. An additional lane could be 
added in the future, if necessary. 

Mr. O'Brien also strongly urged consideration of the possi 
bility of leaving the shoreline in its natural state at the southeas 
water edge (building no dike at all here) . This is the exact area 
of controversy concerning type of dike construction. Mr. O'Brien 
feels this is the area needing the least protection. He urged se- 
rious consideration of enhancing the aesthetic potential at this 
location by developing "natural shore within the city," if it can be 
preserved. He felt that the risk of shore washout to seriously 
damage the buildings was minimal. 

In regard to the expected extensive public use of the 
Columbia Point site waterfront, Mr. Cusack is to arrange for a repotft 
back to the committee detailing the conclusions of a re-investigatic n 
of the amount of protection necessary along the shoreline. The Master 
Plan suggests that, for aesthetic reasons, no railings be used alonj 
the top of the dike. 

A full report on all points raised by committee members it 
to be prepared, Mr. Cusack said. This should be ready within two 
weeks . 



The meeting was adjourned at 3:15 p.m. 




?ot>ert 
Secretary, 




Cartne 
d of Trustees/, 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON FACULTY AND 

EDUCATIONAL POLICY 

January 20, 1971, 10:30 a.m., Board Room, Whitmore Administration 

Building, UM/Amherst 

PRESENT: Trustees and Trustee Staff : 

Chairman Troy; Trustees Abrams, Lambson, Lyons; Secretary 
McCartney, Mrs. Hull 

Administrators, Faculty, Staff, and Invited Guests : 

From System Office : 
Vice President Phillips 

From UM/Amherst : 

Chancellor Tippo, Provost Gluckstern, Associate Provost 
Bischoff; Representing the Faculty Senate, Professor John 
Roberts; Representing Student Trustee Elters, Thomas Fill- 
more 

From UM/Boston : 

Chancellor Broderick, Dean Hoopes 

From UM/Worcester : 
Dean Saunders 



The meeting was convened by Chairman Troy at 10:45 a.m. 

The Chairman prefaced the regular agenda with general re- 
marks regarding certain matters which he would like to have discussec 
at later meetings of this Committee between now and June. He was not 
so concerned, he said, about the present policy-making powers of the 
Trustees in these matters, but rather simply interested in knowing 
more about the current academic policies of the University and "how 
they are working." The Chairman felt that the Board of Trustees 
would be more effective if it were kept accurately and completely 
informed at all times. There had been, he felt, a breakdown in es- 
sential communication at some levels, particularly in follow-through 
reporting on the status of some important programs and policies 
undertaken within the last few years. 



Chairman Troy listed the following matters to be discussed 
in the forthcoming months: (1) Graduate School - focusing on the 
subject "Is the present contraction of the market for Ph.D.'s serious ly 
affecting our graduate school admission policy, and other Graduate 
School policies? How will this change affect the size and shape of 
the Graduate School in the coming decade?" Additionally, Chairman 
Troy said that he would like to have Dean Appley discuss anything 
else he felt the Board should know about. Of particular interest to 
the Trustees, he said, will be an evaluation of the programs put 
through "in the great and expansive rush of the sixties." 



3673 



Faculty and 
Educational 
Policy 
1-20-71 



Review of 
Certain 
Matters by 
Comm. on 
Faculty & 
Educational 
Policy 



3674 



Faculty and 
Educational 
Policy 
1-20-71 

COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

(2) What is the admissions policy at UM/Boston ? The 
Chairman recalled that UM/Amherst Dean of Admisssions Tunis had giver 
a report on Amherst admissions policies three or four years ago. We 
would like, he said, to have a similar report for Boston. What kind 
of students are we getting at Boston? How do their achievement and 
test records campare with those at Amherst and comparable institutions? 
He and Dr. Abrams, Chairman Troy said, had each raised the same ques- 
tion at Hyannis. Is the University of Massachusetts at Amherst and 
Boston following the general plan of the California System? (Which 
would mean that the University takes the best students, the state 
colleges take those with somewhat lower achievement or ability, and 
the community colleges taking others such as "late bloomers," etc.) 
If not, does it intend to? Chairman Troy felt that a detailed analy- 
sis and report on admissions policies at UM/Boston should prove il- 
luminating to all concerned. 

(3) What is the status of the Pass-Fail system at Amherst 
and Boston? How widely is it employed? Is it being currently eval- 
uated? What is student and faculty response? What is its likely 
future? 

(4) What is the attrition rate at Amherst and Boston, 
especially in the first two years; with particular emphasis on the 
first year? How is academic failure determined at Amherst and Bostor 
Could we have a report on the policy change of a few years ago to 
raise the standard of achievement for graduation at UM/Amherst from 
1.8 to 2.0? 

(5) What is the teaching load of our faculty at the varioi s 



levels and how is it determined : by departments, by schools or col- 



leges or by the administration? Is the faculty happy with the load? 
The Chairman made it clear that the Trustees had no wish to interfere 
in areas traditionally reserved for the faculty and administration; 
but he felt that a re-definition of current practices and an accurate 
description of these practices "might illuminate a situation or stim- 
ulate a desire for reform, if reform is needed." 

(6) Evaluation of the scope and current success of the 
Programs for Disadvantaged Students at UM/Amherst and UM/Boston . Hov 



are these programs handled? What are the recommendations to modify 
or improve them? How many persons are currently involved in tutoring 
and/or counseling? 

Chairman Troy asked for comments on these proposals . 

Trustees Lambson recalled that he had previously suggested 
that department heads provide the Trustee with a "white paper" period 
ically, which would detail current activities. Trustees, he said, 
are constantly being questioned by the general public and are at a 
disadvantage when not fully informed. 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Chancellor Tippo responded that plans had already been 
made to supply information on some of the subjects raised by Chairma 
Troy. For example, a Graduate School report is in preparation. It 
was agreed that the Graduate School report would be made in February 
also, that the UM/Boston Admissions Report would be made in March. 

Turning to the regular agenda, Sabbatical Leave Recommenda 
tions, UM/ Amherst was the first item taken up by the committee. 

Chancellor Tippo reviewed the established policy regarding 
sabbatical leaves (faculty members are eligible after six full years 
of service for one semester of sabbatical leave at full pay, or one- 
year at one-half pay.) This policy, he said, is followed to the let 
ter. $63,000 was budgeted for sabbatical replacement, and recommend 
tions are within budget. 

Provost Gluckstern reviewed the UM/ Amherst sabbatical leav^ 
recommendations. There are 1357 faculty positions authorized as of 
September, 1970. 96 sabbatical leave recommendations have been ap- 
proved, after careful review procedures which involve the various 
departments, the Provost's Office and the Chancellor. The number of 
sabbaticals approved this year is larger than last (68 last year), 
but this is in part a reflection of the fact that Dr. Tippo had ini 
tiated a very active recruiting program in 1964, with a net faculty 
increase of 100 that year. Provost Gluckstern distributed a summary 
sheet giving a breakdown of the Sabbatical Leave Requests - 1971-72 
He also noted that the ratio of sabbaticals is 1-14. 



After discussion, it was moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that the Sabbatic 
Leave recommendations for UM/ Amherst for 1971-72 as sub 
mitted by the Provost and as detailed in Document T71-0 
be approved. 

Sabbatical Leave Recommendations, UM/Boston were reviewed 
by Chancellor Broderick and Dean Hoopes. 

Chancellor Broderick noted that the upcoming year would 
mark the seventh year of operation for UM/Boston. Fortunately, not 
all eligible faculty members are now requesting their sabbatical 
leave he said. 

Dean Hoopes noted that 15 applications, all for senior 
faculty, have been approved administratively. There is one deletion 
on the list: Professor George Goodwin has requested that his leave 
request be deferred. The ratio of sabbaticals for UM/Boston stands 
at 1-17. Dr. Hoopes recommended approval of the UM/Boston list. 

After discussion, and on motion made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that the 

Sabbatical Leave recommendations for UM/Boston as 
submitted by the Dean of Faculty and as detailed 



,il 
■>1 



3675 



Faculty and 
Educational 
Policy 
1-20-71 



UM/ Amherst 

Sabbatical 

Leave 

Recommendations 

1971-72 



UM/Boston 
Sabbatical 
Leave 

Recommenda- 
tions 
1971-72 



3676 



Faculty and 
Educational 
Policy 
1-20-71 

COMMITTEE 

UM/Amherst- 
Promotions, 
February 1, 
1971 



UM/Boston- 
Promotions , 
February 1, 
1971 



UM/ Amherst- 

Selective 

Merit 

Increments. 

1971 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

in Document T7 1-068 be approved. 

Provost Gluckstern next presented recommendations for 
Pr omotions-UM/ Amherst , effective February 1, 1971. He detailed the 
very careful procedures used in each step of the evaluation process. 
86 recommendations were approved out of the 106 submitted. Most of 
the recommendations not approved were actually postponements, rather 
than rejections, on the basis of premature submission. The Provost 
said that the general rule for promotion required an individual to 
serve six years within one rank before being recommended to go, for 
instance, from assistant to associate professor. 

Trustee Lambson commented on the "tendency in academe to 
set levels of rank, with higher salaries as the incentive." He fa- 
vored promotion as ability warranted, noting that, outside of academi 
communities, the incentive for promotion is usually based "on provid 
ing proof of performance." 

After further discussion, it was moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees the recommendations 
for Promotions, as submitted for UM/ Amherst, and as de- 
tailed in Document T71-069 be approved. 

Recommendations for Promotions, UM/Boston , effective Feb- 
ruary 1, 1971, were presented by Dean Hoopes. 20 recommendations 
were approved administratively out of the 22 submitted. Two promo- 
tions on the final list, the Dean said, were "automatic" promotions, 
for instructors who had received their Ph.D's. 

Some discussion was generated on the matter of "automatic" 
promotions of this type, even though an instructor's appointment can 
be made with the provision that promotion to assistant professor is 
contingent on attainment of the Ph.D. Trustee Troy asked if an in- 
dividual "who might be performing poorly as a teacher" would then be 
promoted on this basis. Chancellor Broderick felt that promotion 
would probably be made, but that this did not rule out a later termi 
nation of contract. Chancellor Tippo said that, at UM/ Amherst, the 
language contained in the appointment of a doctoral candidate as 
instructor made it very clear that a recommendation for promotion 
would be made, but that this was a recommendation only and could be 
overturned . 

After further brief discussion, it was moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that the recommenc 
ations for Promotions, as submitted by UM/Boston, and as 
detailed in Document T71-070 , be approved. 

Recommendations for Selective Academic Merit Increments , 
UM/Amherst - 1971 were presented by Chancellor Tippo. He noted that 
an analysis of merit increment recommendations had been distributed. 
The Chancellor also reviewed the guidelines used in setting these 
salary adjustments: (1) service of one and one-half years before 
consideration, (2) a ceiling, in most cases, of $1600 (a ceiling 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

in "special" cases of $2000); also, (3) a "topping-of f" of certain 
administrative salaries. He noted that there was a reserve in funds 
alloted for merit increases as detailed on the analysis sheet, but 
that this probably would be absorbed in the expected "across-the- 
board" state salary increase. 

Provost Gluckstern reviewed the detailed procedures re- 
quired by his office in the determination of individual merit incre- 
ment recommendations. 

Trustee Lambson commended the careful processes of evalua- 
tion used in recommending salary increases, but he expressed concern 
about the inflationary factor involved in "two types of raises" -- 
merit, and across-the-board for all state employees. He expressed 
the opinion that, with legislative budgetary cutbacks in evidence 
in the support services area on the Amherst campus (i.e., security 
personnel, residence hall maintenance, lack of adequate lighting in 
parking areas, etc.,) salary levels should perhaps be looked at in 
relation to the total budget. 

There was a concensus that inflationary factors and the 
generally competitive situation of the past few years had perhaps 
affected the academic salary profile. Concern was expressed about 
inflationary trends nationwide throughout the economy. Chancellor 
Tippo noted that all non-professional state employees are entitled tc 
"step" raises in addition to the cost-of-living raise. Vice Presider 
Phillips emphasized the absolute necessity of preserving the autoaomj 
of the University with regard to merit increases, in the interest of 
continuing to provide highest quality of education. 



367? 



Faculty and 
Educational 
Policy 
1-20-71 



After further discussion, and on motion made and seconded, 



it was 



VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that the Recommenc 
ations for Selective Academic Merit Increments-1971 as 
submitted by UM/ Amherst, and as detailed in Document 
T71-061 be approved. 

Recommendations for Selective Merit Increments, UM/Boston 
1971 were presented by Dean Hoopes. The Dean described the procedure 
used in his evaluation of the recommendations submitted. Department 
he said, were instructed to recommend total increases not exceeding 
57o of their existing faculty salaries. Senior members of the three 
divisions at UM/Boston had served in an advisory capacity to the Dear 
in making evaluations. He has also relied heavily on the recommenda- 
tions of Chancellor Broderick. A ceiling of $1600 had been used for 
increases, except in special cases, and these have been detailed in a 
memorandum to President Wood. This memorandum has also been made 
available to the Committee. 

After discussion, it was moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that the recommend 
tions for Selective Academic Merit Increments-1971 as 
submitted by UM/Boston, and as detailed in Document 



UM/Boston - 
Selective 
Merit 

Increments , 
1971 



3678 



Faculty and 
Educational 
Policy 
1-20-71 

COMMITTEE 

Medical 
School - 
UM/ Worcester 

Selective 
Merit 
Increment, 1971 



Medical 
School - 
UM/Worcester - 
Appointment, 
Dr. Donald 
Tipper -- 
Professor and 
Chairman of 
the Department 
of 
Microbiology 



UM/Worcester -■ 

Progress 

Report 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

T71-061 , be approved. 

Following a brief recess for lunch, the committee took up 
the UM/Worcester agenda items. 

Selective Academic Merit Increments-1971 -- Medical School , 
UM/Worcester were discussed by Dean Saunders. The Dean detailed the 
thorough review which had been made, leading to the recommendations 
as presented. Salaries had been discussed with President Wood, who 
had depended heavily on Dean Soutter's analysis, Dr. Saunders said. 

After discussion, it was moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that the recommenda- 
tions for Selective Academic Merit Increments - 1971, as 
submitted by UM/Worcester , and as detailed in Document 
T71-061 , be approved. 

The Appointment of Dr. Donald Tipper as Professor and Chair 



man of the Department of Microbiology , UM/Worcester was discussed. 
Dean Saunders provided background information on Dr. Tipper's training 
and experience, which it is felt, will prove invaluable to the Medical 
School. 

After discussion, and on motion made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that the appoint- 
ment of Dr. Donald Tipper as Professor and Chairman of 
the Department of Microbiology in the Medical School, 
UM/Worcester, be approved effective July 1, 1971. 

Dean Saunders also presented a report on the academic pro- 
gress of the first-year students at the Medical School. He described 
the courses they have completed thus far, and the work they are doing 
in the field of community medicine under the direction of Dr. Fulmer. 
To date, there has been no state scholarship money available to the 
medical students. One-half of them are already indebted and have 
applied for financial assistance with regard to next fall, 503 appli- 
cations have been received to date, as against 293 last year -- 
representing a 667, increase. The possibility of increasing the next 
class from 16 to 20 students is under consideration, but there is no 
certainty that these arrangements will actually work out due to space 
limitations and other factors. A report from Dean Soutter is expected 
shortly on hospital affiliation with institutions in the Worcester 
area. 

The meeting was adjourned at 1:35 p.m. 




Robert J./MoCartney 
Secretary, B<{aj7ti of Trustees 




COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON FINANCE 
January 22, 1971, 11:00 a.m., Room 433, Statler-HiltonHotel, Boston 



PRESENT: Trustees and Trustee Staff : 

Chairman Pumphret; Trustees Knowles, Rowland; Treasurer 
Johnson, Secretary McCartney, Mrs. Hull 

Administrators, Faculty, Staff, and Invited Guests : 

From System Office : 

Mr. Phillips, Vice President for Administration; Mr. 
Lashman, Vice President for Development; Mr. Weinstein, 
Mr. Brand 

For UM/Amherst : 

Chancellor Tippo; Mr. Campion, Vice Chancellor for Admin. 
Services; Mr. Clay; Prof. James Ludtke, representing the 
Faculty Senate Finance Committee 

From UM/Boston : 

Chancellor Broderick; Vice Chancellor Hamilton 

From UM/Worcester : 
Dean Soutter 

From Standish, Ayer and Wood, Inc. : Messrs. Ladd, Whitehead 



Chairman Pumphret convened the meeting at 11:05 a.m. 

Recommendations of Investment Counsel--Standish, Ayer and 
Wood, Inc. , were presented by Mr. Ladd. He distributed a current 
appraisal of the security portfolio. Some of the Murray D. Lincoln 
Trust Fund holdings are included in this listing; others are still 
to come in. Mr. Ladd proposed certain exchanges of current holdings 
and this program was approved by the committee. 

Northwest Airlines holdings, of particular concern to the 
committee, were discussed by Mr. Whitehead, who provided details of 
the company's background, business policies, and long-range growth 
potential. The committee decided that, while Northwest should pro- 
bably rank near the top in possible airlines investments, it was not 
the most suitable investment for University endowment funds at the 
present time. 

It was therefore moved, seconded and 

VOTED: To authorize the Treasurer of the University, Kenneth W. 
Johnson, to execute the following changes in the Univer- 
sity's investment portfolio as recommended by Standish, 
Ayer and Wood, Inc.: 



3679 



Finance 
1-22-71 



System Office- 
Recommendations, 
Investment 
Counsel-- 
Endowment Funds 



3680 



Finance 
1-22-71 



COMMITTEE 



Private Fund 
Raising-- 
University 
System 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Row 



K 



400 400 Aetna Life 
158 1158 N.E. Util. 
500 500 Sec. Pac . 



Hi 



Buy 

450 250 

80 20 

400 400 

700 

Now 

old Sell 



1000 1000 N.W. Airl. 



Bu 



old Sell Issue 



Cost 



Price Market Income 



(1.40) $16,156 

(0.94) 11,469 

(1.28) 19,818 

$47,443 



51 $20,400 $ 560 

15 17,370 1,089 

39 19,500 640 

$57,270 $2,289 



Resultin 
Holding 



Continental Can 
I. B. M. 
Travelers Corp. 
Wells Fargo 



(1.60) 


37 


$ 9,250 $ 400 


(4.80) 


315 


6,300 96 


(0.80) 


34 


13,600 320 


(1.60) 


44 


30,800 1,120 



Issue 



Cost Price 



$59,950 $1,930 



Marke t I nc ome 



25,900 
31,500 
27,200 
30,800 

Resultin 
Holding 



(0.45) $28,697 24 $24,000 $ 450 



25M Central Hudson cv. 6's? 1978 100? $25,000 $1,500 25,000 

The question of legal documentation authorizing Standish, 
Ayer and Wood, Inc., to execute transactions with brokers and dealers 
for the University of Massachusetts was also discussed. It was agree 
that this must be in accord with Stock Exchange regulations. Mr. 
Broadhurst will be requested to draw up a suitable document as a basis 
for a Trustee vote on this matter. 

Mr. Ladd also presented an analysis of the current bond 
market and the general financial situation as it might affect the 
forthcoming sale of University Building Authority bonds. 

Trustee Knowles requested earlier distribution of the in- 
vestment counsel reports, noting that there was no time for study of 
the recommendations when they were received at the time of the meeti 
Mr. Ladd agreed that, inthe future, earlier distribution of these 
reports would be made to the committee. 

Private Fund Raising—University System was discussed by 
Vice President Lashman. He reviewed the content of a memorandum 
written earlier for President Wood outlining how fund-raising efforts: 
might be formalized. Mr. Lashman also detailed an updated report on 
fund raising for state universities in the nation as a whole, broken 
down as to sources of support and comparative fugures for representa- 
tive individual institutions. 

Some investigation of fund-raising counselling firms has 
been made by Mr. Lashman. There is a sharp division between firms 
whose expertise lies either with the public or the private sectors 
of higher education. The services of fund-raising counsel, Mr. Lash- 
man said, would provide an assesment of our critical needs and special 
strengths and weaknesses and would identify staffing needs. Also 
identified would be the most likely sources of support. He stressed 
the need to bring the body of alumni from the Amherst campus and fron 
UM/Boston into planning from the outset. 

Mr. Lashman felt that the essential first step in a fund- 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



raising program would be development and identification of a series 
of programmatic needs on a priority basis across the entire Univer- 
sity system. 

The Vice President said he was particularly anxious that a 
feasibility study be done by a fund-raising counsel firm as quickly 
as possible. In this way, a proposed program could be studied, 
brought to the Trustees, and, if approved, could be in operation by 
fall of 1971. 

Mr. Phillips said that funds for the feasibility study were 
included in the budget figures he would present for the President's 
Office. 

After further discussion, it was moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that the President 
be authorized, in consultation with the Committee on 
Finance, to engage appropriate counsel to complete a 
study of private fund raising for the University System, 
with the proviso that subsequent regular use of counsel 
is subject to further review by the Committee on Finance 
prior to entering into a contract for such services. 

The Personnel Protection Policy was reviewed by Treasurer 
Johnson. Questions had been raised on this policy at the last meet 
ing of the committee. A subsequent memorandum on the subject was 
prepared by Mr. ]yfey^*rg> UM/ Amherst staff attorney, and distributed 
to the Trustees. 

Treasurer Johnson recommended, on the basis of the memoran 
dum, that the University continue the Lumberman's Mutual policy with 
the Francis P. Lyons Agency at the premium quoted. 

Chairman Pumphret pointed out that, in developing the pre- 
mium, the loss ratio had evidently not been considered over a three 
year period. It was his opinion that the losses involved did not 
justify the percentage of premium increase. It was agreed, however 
that the confused insurance situation in Massachusetts was probably 
a contributing factor. Renewal of the contract was recommended for 
this year, with any subsequent contracts to be negotiated at an earl 
ier date prior to expiration of the policy. 

It was therefore moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that the Personnel 
Protection Policy be awarded for 1971 to the Francis P. 
Lyons Agency at a sole bid premium of $15,325.66, with 
the proviso that any subsequent contracts be negotiated 
at an earlier date prior to the annual date of expiratioh 
of the policy. 



3681 



Finance 
1-22-71 



UM/System-- 
Personnel 
Protection 
Policy 



3682 



Finance 
1-22-71 

Treasurer' s 
Quarterly 
Report-- 
UM/Amherst, 

COMMITTEE 

Worcester, 

Boston, 

July 1, 1970 - 

Dec. 31, 1970 

UM/System-- 
Presldent ' s 
Office Budget 



UM/ Amherst — 
Reduction of 

Physical Educa- 
tion Fee for 
Stockbridge 
Students 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



The Treasurer's Quarterly Report, Amherst-Worcester-Boston 



July 1, 1970, to December 31, 1970 , having been distributed to the 
Trustees, Mr. Johnson asked if there were questions concerning it. 
There were none. The Treasurer was commended for developing a new, 
easier-to-use format . (Document T71-071 ) 



The President's Office Budget was reviewed by Vice President 
Phillips. In addition to the Supplemental Budget Request of $100,000 
granted by the legislature for the operation of the President's Office 
Mr. Phillips noted with thanks a UM/ Amherst contribution of $35,000 
and a UM/Boston contribution of $30,000. These were made in an effort 
to work within total University resources, beyond the initial appro- 
priation. 

In addition, Mr. Phillips said, Dean Soutter has arranged 
for $129,000 in Medical School funds to be made available for the 
operation of the President's Office for the remainder of the year. 
This budget includes fund-raising study expenses but does not includ^ 
an item for funding of the Institute for Governmental Services. 

After brief discussion, it was moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that a transfer 

between subsidiary accounts, Medical School, UM/Worcester 

From 01 to 02 $ 3,000 

From 01 to 03 $126,000 

to be made available for the operation of the Office of 
the President be approved. 

Re duction Q f Physical Education Fee for Stockbridge Stu - 
dents, UM/ Amherst , was next discussed by Chancellor Tippo. Noting 
that all freshmen entering the University are now assessed a $20.00 
physical education fee, the Chancellor recommended that the fee 
charged Stockbridge students be set at $10.00. This would be a more 
equitable assessment since these are two-year students. 

There was discussion of a general grouping of fees, with 
agreement that an all-inclusive four-year fee would be desirable. 
Chancellor Tippo indicated that this matter would be studied. Vice 
President Phillips pointed out that a policy question would arise 
for students who prepaid fees but did not remain at the University 
for the full term. 

After further brief discussion, it was moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that the physical 
education fee charged Stockbridge students be reduced to 
$10.00 effective September, 1971. 



th 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Transfer of funds from the Amherst Trust Fund Interest 
Account to the Receiving Tellers Petty Cash Fund , UM/Amherst, for 
reimbursement of a shortage for the period July 1, 1970, through 
January 10, 1971, was requested by Treasurer Johnson to coincide wi 
the assumption of accountability for these funds by Vice Chancellor 
Campion. 

It was therefore moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that Treasurer 
Kenneth W. Johnson be and he hereby is authorized to 
transfer the sume of $290.46 from the Amherst Campus 
Trust Fund Interest account (contingency section) to 
the Receiving Tellers petty cash fund for the Amherst 
Campus; reimbursement of the shortage for the period 
July 1, 1970, through January 10, 1971, is made pursuant 
to the cash audit performed by the Internal Audit Depart 
ment of the University at 8:00 A.M., Monday, January 11, 
1971, which officially transferred accountability of all 
cash and cash items from Treasurer Johnson to Vice Chan- 
cellor Thomas B. Campion. 

Transfers, UM/Boston , were reviewed by Vice Chancellor 



Hami 1 1 on , 



3683 



Finance 
1-22-71 

UM/Amherst 
Transfer of 
Funds --Received 
Tellers Shortage, 
7/1/70 through 
1/10/71 



After discussion, it was moved, seconded and 



VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that the following 
transfers between subsidiary accounts, UM/Boston, be 
approved: 



From 



To 



Amount 



01 


03 


$90,000.00 


08 


03 


47,000.00 


13 


03 


70,000.00 


15 


03 


75,000.00 


16 


03 


18,000.00 


16 


10 


2,000.00 


16 


14 


20,000.00 



$322,000.00 

For purposes of information, Vice Chancellor Hamilton noted 
that a request for authorization to submit a supplemental budget 
request in the amount of $300,000 for library books, UM/Boston, will 
come before the Finance Committee at a later date. 

The Vice Chancellor also announced the recent gifts to 
UM/Boston of $20,000 for scholarships for the sons and daughters of 
the International Brotherhood of Telephone Worders, Local #1. This 
gift brings the total of scholarship gifts in the past three months 
to $25,000. 



UM/Boston-- 
Transfers, 
Subsidiary 
Accounts 



UM/Boston-- 
Scholarship 
Funds 



3684 



Finance 
1-22-71 

UM/Worcester-- 
Selection of 
Bank, COMMITTEE 
Medical School 



UM/Worcester-- 
Allocation of 
Research Funds 



UM/ Amherst-- 
Parking Garage 
Rates--Campus 
Center 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Dean Soutter announced the Selection of a Bank in Worcester 
for the Medical School 



After considering presentations from all the 
banks in the city, the Dean said, selection has been made of the 
Worcester County National Bank. At a later date, as funds available 
accrue, other banks in the City of Worcester will be considered for 
deposit. 

Regarding Allocation of Research Trust Funds — Budget Cate - 
gories, UM/Worcester Medical School , Dean Soutter requested allocatic 
as follows: $4,000, Worcester Foundation; $800, contigency fund. 

It was therefore moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that Budget Cate- 
gories, Research Trust Funds, Medical School, UM/Worceste 
be allocated as follows: 

to Worcester Foundation $4,000 

to Contingency Fund $ 800 

The Parking Garage, Campus Center, UM/Amherst , was dis- 
cussed by Chancellor Tippo as an additional agenda item. Reviewing 
the first 100 days of operation of the garage, the Chancellor said 
that receipts so far had been only 10 percent of expectations. Some 
revision of the maximum daily rate downward from the current $2.00 
charge is suggested. 

After discussion of this matter, it was agreed that furthei 
studies would be made based on expected occupancy and revenues at 
various rates projected previously in relation to operating costs. 
A report and recommendation will be provided for the further considera- 
tion of the committee. 



The meeting was adjourned at 12:55 p.m. 




Robert 
Secretary, 



/McCartney 
/ard of Truste 




UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 
January 22, 1971, 1:30 p.m., Room 433, Statler Hilton Hotel, Boston 



PRESENT: Trustees and Trustee Staff : 

Chairman Healey; Trustees Haigis, Pumphret, Rowland, Troy; 
Treasurer Johnson, Secretary McCartney, Mrs. Hull. 

Administrators, Faculty, Staff, and Invited Guests : 

From System Office : Vice Presidents Phillips and Lashman; 
Mr. Brand 

From UM/Amherst : Chancellor Tippo, Vice Chancellor Campion 
Mr. Clay; Professor Roberts, representing the UM/Amherst 
Faculty Senate 

From UM/Boston : Chancellor Broderick; Professor James 
Broderick, representing the UM/Boston Faculty Senate 

From UM/Worcester : Dean Soutter 



The meeting was convened by the Chairman at 2:00 p.m. 

Honorary Degrees, UM/Amherst , was the first item taken up 
by the committee. Chancellor Tippo reported on a meeting held recen 
with the Honorary Degree Advisory Committee from which has come a 
suggested change in the 1971 list of proposed recipients. He reported 
on acceptances to date. He also emphasized the fact that an earlier 
start should be made in this matter as was done in previous years-- 
probably in May. It was agreed that the first meeting each year on 
honorary degrees should be a joint meeting of the Trustee Executive 
Committee and the Advisory Committee on Honorary Degrees. After 
extensive discussion of the 1971 nominees, the Trustees reaffirmed 
the list, including choice of speaker, which they had previously 
approved. 

Upon motion made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that the list of 

honorary degree recipients for 1971, as previously approve 
by the Trustees, be reaffirmed. 

Selective Administrative and Professional Merit Increments 



1971, System Office, UM/Amherst, UM/Boston, UM/Worcester, were next 
discussed (Document T71-061 ) . 

Chairman Healey commented on the difficulty of assessing 
recommended increments, with no salary history available in some po- 
sitions. He had also commented on this situation last year. He 
expressed concern over the serious financial situation in the Commonj- 
wealth. He was attuned, he said, to the prevailing climate of public 
opinion in general, and also within higher education. He noted that 



3685 



Executive 
1-22-71 



UM/Amherst- 
ly Honorary 
Degrees, 
1971 



System Office, 
UM/Amherst, 
UM/Boston, 
UM/Worcester 
Selective 
Administrative 
and Professional 
Merit 

Increments, 
1971 



3686 



Executive 
1-22-71 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

economies are being practiced by private institutions such as re- 
ductions in staff, no salary increases, freezing of vacant positions 
etc. He wondered if a "business as usual" approach for salary in- 
creases could be continued with other University needs going unmet, 
such as insufficient support staff and not enough library books. 

Chancellor Tippo stated for the Amherst campus that "every 
effort has been made to follow the advice you gave us last year." 
The approach to salary increments has been conservative, he said. 
He cited the guidelines applied to all merit increases: (1) no salary 
increases for appointments made after June 1, 1970, (2) a ceiling of 
$1600 (or $2000 in special cases) and (3) no increases for over-scaln 
appointments and (4) "topping-of f" of many second-level administrative 
positions where the salary is felt to have reached a ceiling. 

The Chancellor reminded the Trustees that they had approved 
a 5% request for merit increases from the General Court, and that tho 
allocation had been approved by the legislature expecially for this 
purpose. He said that, due to the conservative approach taken, all 
of the funds allocated had not been used. 

Trustee Pumphret noted that the request to the Board to 
approve a 5% merit increase allocation was made over 18 months ago, 
and that the general economic situation had since changed. He also 
suggested that a restructuring of priorities might be in order. He 
mentioned shortage of books in the UM/ Amherst libraries. He cited 
the additional effect of the anticipated 6% cost-of-living raise for 
all state employees which will later supplement the recommended merit; 
increases. He mentioned the magnitude of variance of dollar yield 
resulting from application of a cost-of-living increase in the higher 
salary ranges . 

Professor Broderick asked if the projected UM/ Amherst and 
UM/Boston salary scale would change faculty salary levels in relatioiji 
to California and New York university systems. Chancellor Tippo 
said that he did not have that specific information at hand, but he 
assumed that University of Massachusetts salary levels might then 
rank roughly about 120th in the country. Presently, the University 
ranks about 150th. 

Vice President Phillips stressed the necessity for dis- 
tinguishing between merit increases and general cost-of-living in- 
creases. Merit increases are absolutely essential, he said, if faculty 
and staff are to be rewarded for performance. 

Dean Soutter noted that merit increases for UM/Worcester 
were below the ceiling, at 1/2 of 1% of the annual budget. 

Trustee Troy noted that comments made during the Committee 
on Faculty and Educational Policy's review of faculty merit increase;: 
on January 20, had followed essentially the same line evident at 
today's meeting. He anticipated a "leveling-of f " before the next 
salary review; he also commended the very careful procedures he felt 
had been used in determining the recommended increases. 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Chancellor Tlppo called the committee's attention to five 
changes in Document T71-061 which were detailed in a memorandum dis- 
tributed to the Trustees. 

After further brief discussion, it was moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that the Selective 
Administrative and Professional Merit Increments, 1971, 
System Office, UM/Amherst, UM/Boston, UM/Worcester , as 
detailed in Document T71-061 be approved. 

A Contract with U.S. Forest Service, UM/Amherst , was next 
discussed by Chancellor Tippo. The initial proposal, presented to 
the Board a year ago, indicated that the Amherst campus might be 
used as a center for research with particular emphasis on urban 
developments: "greenbelts," parks, etc. Eventually, the Forest 
Service hopes to erect a building to be used for research purposes. 
In the meantime, space has been found in Flint Laboratory. The con- 
tract provides that the Service will provide salaries for fellowship^ 
and research assistants as well as money for alternations. The 
Chancellor recommended approval of the contract. 

After further brief discussion, and on motion made and 
seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that a research con- 
tract with the U.S. Forest Service (Document T71-072 ) be 
approved. 

Chancellor Tippo stated that he will bring to the Trustees a recom- 
mendation for appointment of a football coach at the meeting of 
January 29, 1971. 

Vice President Phillips disucssed Delegation of Certain 
Administrative Powers . Mr. Broadhurst is preparing a formal delega- 
tion of general powers from the Board of Trustees to the President. 
This, in turn, could be employed for some specific matters now before 
the University. It is proposed, Mr. Phillips said, that the Board 
delegate to the President the authority to sign certain contracts 
with appropriate caveats, limiting redelegation of such powers to 
some suitable level (e.g., Chanceller, Vice Chancellor). The specif 
item now before UM/Boston is a contract for the total electrical 
energy at the Columbia Point Campus. The contract is now ready to 
be signed. A request for specific delegation of powers in this matter 
will be brought to the Board on January 29. Mr. Phillips asked for 
the advice and comment of the committee. 

Chairman Healey felt that a generalized vote is indicated. 
In addition, he would want, he said, a Board vote specifically 
delegating power of ratification in the UM/Boston matter, as the 
electrical energy item is a major contract. The Chairman further 
indicated, since Boston Edison Company is involved, that he, as a 
member of that company's Board of Directors, had not been involved 
and would refrain from voting so that absolutely no question of con- 
flict of interest can arise. 



368? 



Executive 
1-22-71 



UM/Amherst 
Contract 
with U.S. 
Forest 
Service 



UM/Amherst, 

Football 

Coach 

System Office, 
Delegation of 
Certain 
Administrative 
Powers 



3688 



Executive 
1-22-71 



COMMITTEE 

UM/Worcester-- 
App ointment of 
Comptroller 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Trustee Haigis and Vice President Phillips emphasized that 
there would be no abrogation of the responsibilities or the decision- 
making power of the Board of Trustees under the proposed delegation 
of authority to the President. 

Appointment of Comptroller, UM/Worcester , was presented by Dean 
Soutter. Mr. Robert Cathey has been selected from among a large 
group of candidates for this position. Treasurer Johnson has inter- 
viewed Mr. Cathey. The position of Comptroller has been discussed 
with President Wood. Dean Soutter will discuss Mr. Cathey' s qualifi- 
cations further with President Wood. 

Dean Soutter announced the admission of the first black 
(female) student at the Medical School. 

The meeting was adjourned at 3:15 p.m. 




Robert 
Secretary, 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON GOVERNMENT AND UNIVERSITY 

RELATIONS 
January 29, 1971, 11:00 a.m., Room 437, Statler Hilton Hotel, Boston 



PRESENT: Trustees and Trustee Staff : Chairman Gordon, President Woo|d; 
Trustees Croce, Snowden, Troy; Mrs. Hull. Also, Trustee 
Knowles 

Administrators, Faculty, Staff, and Invited Guests : 

From System Office : Vice Presidents Lashman and Phillips; 
Associate Treasurer Brand, Mr. Cass 

From UM/ Amherst : Chancellor Tippo; Representing the Faculty 
Senate, Professor Howards 

From UM/Boston : Chancellor Broderick, Vice Chancellor 
Hamilton 

From UM/Worcester : Dean Soutter 

A Review of Legislation Affecting the University of Massa - 
chusetts--1971 was presented by Mr. Cass who reviewed a six-page 
listing of all such legislation in detail. The first eight bills 



(H 1199, H 1810, H 1811, H 1812, H 1813, H 1880, H 1881, H 1882) were 
filed by the University. 

Chairman Gordon Requested Mr. Cass to prepare a summary of 
all bills, divided into categories as to appropriate action. This 
will be distributed to all members of the Committee and to the Presi- 
dent's Council along with copies of all important legislation. The 
preliminary, noncategorized list is attached. 

The meeting was adjourned at 12:05 p.m. 



3689 



Government and 

University 

Relations 




Robert J. 
Secretary, Boa 





artney 

of Trustees 



Review- - 

Legislation, 

1971 



3690 



Buildings and 

Grounds 

2-12-71 



COMMITTEE 



UM/Amherst-- 
Trans lucent 
Material-- 
New Power Plant 



UM/Amherst-- 
Planning and 
Design 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS 

February 12, 1971; Lunch, 12:30 p.m.; Meeting to follow; 

Copley Room, Hotel Lenox, Boston 



PRESENT: Trustees and Trustee Staff : 

Chairman Haigis, President Wood; Trustees Crowley, Knowles 
Maginnis; Treasurer Johnson, Secretary McCartney 

Administrators, Faculty, Staff, and Invited Guests : 

From System Office : Mr. Weinstein 

From UM/ Amherst : Chancellor Tippo, Mr. Myers 

From UM/Boston : Chancellor Broderick, Planning Officer 
O'Brien 

From UM/Worcester : Mr. Stockwell 

Consultants and Advisers : 

From the BBC , Messrs. Cusack, Flaherty, and McAdam; From 
MBM , Messrs. Cantrell and Dick; From CTM , Messrs. Pollari, 
Mastrobattista, and Wakefield; From WFE , Mr. Wallace 

Chairman Haigis called the meeting to order at 1:35 p.m. 
and introduced the first agenda item, Translucent Material—New Power 
Plant, UM/ Amherst. 



A sample of the proposed translucent material was displayec 
In Mr. Littlef ield 1 s absence, Chairman Haigis reported that a letter 
had been received from the firm of Jackson and More land indicating 
that this material is the best obtainable in terms of both translu- 
cency combined with impact resistance. Moreover, the cost will be 
$25,000 less than if the facing were made of brick. An elevations 
sketch of the new Power Plant was shown, displaying the appearance 
of the Translucent walls. 

Mr. Haigis added that some possibility exists that the 
proposed North Pleasant Street bypass road, when finally constructed, 
be located further east on Tillson Farm property, near the Power Plar 
which would then, of course, be subject to greatly increased public 
exposure. 

After brief further discussion, it was agreed to defer a 
vote of acceptance of the translucent material for the Power Plant 
until President Wood and other administrators who are attending a 
concurrent meeting of the Future University Committee have arrived 
for briefing purposes. 

As an aside, Chairman Haigis noted that plans for "topping 
off" the UM/Amherst campus are definitely in the wind. He feels that 
the Buildings and Grounds Committee should be considering what addi- 
tions to the campus are necessary to complete its requirements. 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

The Chairman stressed the following elements of planning 
and design at UM/ Amherst as either desirable or essential: 

1. Provision of 200 square feet per student in classroom 
and laboratory space. 

2. Creation of a pedestrian mall on North Pleasant 
Street, with location of the proposed Life Science 
Building at an alternate location; e.g., northeast 
of Skinner Hall. 

3. The need for approximately $5,000,000 for general, 
campus-wide landscaping purposes. 

4. Provision of a sports facility: 6,000 seats for 
hockey; 15,000 seats for basketball. 

Mr. Haigis stressed that present facilities for basketball 
and other sports events in the Cage are unsatisfactory and inconve- 
nient, since the size of the campus has completely outstripped the 
capacity of this facility. Basketball games, for example, can accom 
modate only a fraction of the student body whose funds in part support 
this activity. 

5. Possibility of one additional general classroom 
building. 

Mr. Haigis summarized that, even though a limit of 25,000 
students may be placed on future growth at UM/Amherst, as much as an 
additional $40,000,000 in capital outlay may be required to complete 
the job. 

Discussion turned next to agenda item number 2, Moderate 
Change — Modular Classroom Location, UM/Amherst . 

The Chairman state that this was a simple change in the 
proposed location of one of the approved modular classroom buildings 
from the old Conservation Building site at the foot of the Chancellor' 
Drive to a point directly across the street. 

It was then moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that they approve a 
change in location of a modular classroom building from 
the previously approved old Conservation Building site 
northeasterly to a site bounded by the Chancellor's Drive 
on the south and Infirmary Road on the east. 

The Chairman next introduced agenda item 3, Proposed 
Changes: Motor Vehicle Regulations, UM/Amherst . He added that a new 
page 14 was to be substituted for the old page 14 in the regulations 
booklet dated August 11, 1969. Attorney Myers was invited to commenlt 



3691 



Buildings and 

Grounds 

2-12-71 



UM/Amherst- 
Moderate 
Change- 
Modular 
Classroom 
Location 



UM/Amherst 
Proposed 
Changes -- 
Motor Vehicle 
Regulations 



3692 



Buildings and 

Grounds 

2-12-71 



COMMITTEE 



UM/Bos ton- 
Dike Report, 
Columbia 
Point 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Mr. Myers stated that the substitution of page 14 was 
entirely appropriate, that the changes proposed had been reviewed by 
himself as well as Chairman Haigis, and that all changes were found 
to conform to current law in the Commonwealth. Mr. Haigis added 
that the proposed changes were of a "housekeeping nature." For the 
purpose of expediting communication on the campus, however, it is 
hoped that this matter can be brought to the next meeting of the 
Board of Trustees for final approval. 

Mr. Stockwell Queried whether the use of the word "Univer- 
sity" implied that the regulations being approved applied to all three 
campuses. Secretary McCartney commented in the negative, and dis- 
cussion followed. It was the consensus that the document should be 
revised the change all references to "University" to "UM/ Amherst. " 
The Committee, therefore, requests the appropriate administrative 
officials at UM/Amherst to change all references in the Motor Vehicles 
Regulations citing "University" to "UM/Amherst" prior to publication 
of the document after the proposed changes have been approved by the 
full Board of Trustees. 

It was then moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that the proposed 
changes in Motor Vehicle Regulations, UM/Amherst, as 
detailed in Document T71-075 , be approved. 

Before leaving UM/Amherst business, Chairman Haigis noted 
for the record that Representative Thomas Simons of Montague has 
filed a bill (substantially the same as that prepared by his pre- 
decessor, Representative Kostanski) calling for the establishment 
of a study commission to review the feasibility of placing a Common- 
wealth-sponsored sports facility in Amherst, with a final report to 
be made to the Governor in June, 1971. 

Chairman Haigis next called for the Dike Report — UM/Boston - 
Columbia Point . 

UM/Boston Planning Officer O'Brien commented that, at the 
last meeting of the Committee, question was raised concerning the 
proposed dike cross-section, the promenade, and the intake standards. 
He proceeded first to discuss the intake problem. 

The intake has been redesigned to provide a slightly largei 
diameter with a flow of approximately one mile per hour. Additionally 
the design showed a slant screen rather than a vertical one. Query 
by Chairman Haigis elecited the fact that this screen would be firml) 
fixed in concrete with no chance of it being dislodged accidentally 



threefold: 



Mr. O'Brien explained that the reasons for the dike are 



To provide a bOffdt^ for land fill on which to construct 
certain colleges. 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Prevention of trash from washing away into the 
bay. 



3698 



Buildings 
and Grounds 
2-12-71 



3. Shore protection. 

Mr. O'Brien explained that Colleges, One, Two, and Four 
will be located right on the shore where water exists at the present 
time. The dike will require a full section of these locations. In 
the vicinity of future College Five, however, the half section may 
be adequate. He pointed out that the Columbia Point site is not an 
exposed location, but rather "a cove within a harbor, within Massa- 
chusetts Bay." Furthermore, the direction and force of the wind 
flow are important factors. Engineers anticipate that wave develop- 
ment from the Savin Hill side (with only 1,000-foot fetch) will be 
negligible; waves of two-foot height may be expected on the eastern 
face and of approximately three-foot height on the northeast exposurp 
with the longest fetch. 

Combining the worst possible weather conditions: high 
winds, high tide, and high waves--the so-called 100-year tide may go 
over the sixteen-foot level (top of dike) with a slight wash. 

The basic question is whether or not the half section at 
21.5 feet at the eastern end of the dike section is sufficient as a 
substitute for the proposal in the original Master Plan. The engineers 
say that it is. 

Trustee Knowles reported on a personal site visit to 
Columbia Point which she had made this morning. Her opinion was tha 
the area is filled with all kinds of rocks, cans, logs, and debris. 
She concludes that heavy protection is still needed at the northeast 
side. She added that it was very gratifying to observe the extensiv^ 
work in progress there. She recommended that other members also 
visit the site. 

Mr. O'Brien pointed out that a change in the northeast 
site edge will be necessary, at the location of Colleges One and Two 
Site limitations here dictate the placing of the dike in the water, 
a change felt to be acceptable. 

The possibility of providing docking facilities for oceano 
graphic research ar Columbia Point was presented to the committee 
through a memorandum from Vice Chancellor Hamilton to Mr. O'Brien, 
dated February 10, 1971. 

This matter .was discussed, with consensus that informal 
study of the question should continue. President Wood expressed the 
necessity for intercampus coordination of related research programs, 
and particularly the impact of these programs on capital outlay re- 
quests. He asked that the academic relationship of the proposed 
UM/Boston program to the existing UM/ Amherst programs in marine 
science be defined. 



UM/Boston-- 
Dike Report- 
Docking 
Facilities 



3 



Buildings and 

Grounds 

2-12-71 



COMMITTEE 



UM/Boston-- 
Bus Station, 
Columbia 
Point 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

On the question of dike construction, Mr. O'Brien said 
that he had recently discussed this problem with Mr. Sasaki, who is 
of the opinion that there are two possible alternatives: (1) make 
no changes in the shoreline, and (2) provide heavy protection. 

It was noted that the possibility of a dock for future 
research purposes was not precluded by proceeding with dike construe 
tion and could remain an option for future consideration. 



After further general discussion, it was moved, seconded 



and 



VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that construction of 
the dike at the Columbia Point site proceed according to 
the plan as presented by the engineering firm of Charles T 
Main concurrently with discussions between UM/Boston and 
UM/ Amherst relative to a possible docking facility at 
Boston for oceanographic research. 

Mr. O'Brien next reported on the Bus Station—Columbia 
Point . He recalled that last April he had recommended, after unsuc- 
cessful attempts to get a transit link to the Columbia Point campus, 
that planning begin on construction of a bus station as an interim 
solution. The proposal, as previously outlined, calls for a bus 
stop at the lowest level with elevators leading up to the plaza and 
the closed pedestrian concourse. The bus station would be located 
at the site of the transit station, should this become a reality, 
and would be convertible to this use. 

Wallace, Floyd, and Ellencweig, the designers of the Service 
Building, have worked out preliminary plans for the bus station as 
an extension of their contract. Cost estimates have now been receive 
and are within budget at 1.1 million. This item, Mr. O'Brien pointe> 
out, is "on the edge" of the total budget, and actual construction 
will depend on availability of funds, which in turn is contingent on 
all other bids coming in within estimates. 

Mr. David Wallace, for Wallace, Floyd, and Ellencweig, 
reviewed the general site and floor plans as well as the circulation 
patterns. Future possible expansion of the facility has been taken 
into consideration. 

A single escalator system would handle 500 students per 
hour, with double that capacity provided by a second system, which 
could be constructed at an additional cost of around $120,000. The 
direction of the escalator would be reversible, and there would be 
an adjacent sent of stairs. Chancellor Broderick felt that the 
second escalator would be essential, due to the possibility of mechar 
ical breakdown. 

Mr. O'Brien recommended approval of the working drawings as 
submitted, noting that the project will not go out to bid unless the 
funds are available. 



r 



[ 



i 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Chairman Haigis pointed out that the bus station will 
actually be the point of entrance and exit to the campus for commuterjt; 
and that students will spend much time there. He requested that 
aesthetic considerations be given a priority consideration in plans 
for the facility. It should be, he said, not merely a "swinging gate 
but the entrance to the University, where aesthetic values would have 
great impact. 

Mr. O'Brien referred to a letter from Dean Belluschi on 
this issue in which the design of the facility is commended as being 
"handsome in its simplicity." Aesthetics of the site will, of course, 
be considered, he said, with landscaping and the provision of a wind- 
screen as necessities. These details will appear later in the working 
drawings . 

After further discussion, it was moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that they approve the 
preliminary plans for the Bus Station, Columbia Point, as 
presented by Wallace, Floyd, and Ellencweig, and to proceed 
with working drawings, with the understanding that the con 
struction of the facility is contingent upon the availability 
of funds . 



Land Purchase--Wigwam Hill, UM/Worcester Medical School , 
was discussed by Mr. Stockwell. He noted that appraisals, based on 
sales of comparable property, have been received for four parcels of 
property—two of which are contiguous and two of which are scattered 
in location. Authority to negotiate for this property is requested, 
with purchase subject to availability of funds. Location of these 
properties had been pointed out by Mr. Stockwell as a previous meetin 
of the Committee. 

After discussion, and on motion made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that authority be 

granted to the administration to proceed with negotiations 
for acquisition of four parcels of land on Wigwam Hill, 
City of Worcester, on the basis on appraisals on file in 
the Treasurer's Office. 

Mr. Stockwell also reported that the Shaw Building renova- 
tions are proceeding on schedule. It has become apparent, however, 
that the Shaw Building will not be adequate to house all Medical 
School personnel. Some 40 to 50 members of the administrative staff 
cannot be accommodated. Quarters will have to be found elsewhere. 

Treasurer Johnson reported that the City of Waltham has 
requested that the University of Massachusetts relinquish part of the 
Waltham Field Station property for a housing project. There are 
several reasons why this is not possible, the Treasurer said, and he 
will so notify the City of Waltham. He added that the Field Station 
deed is restricted in that, if no longer needed by the University, 
the property is to revert to the city for "public park purposes." 

Furthermore, an act of the legislature would be necessary to transfer 



3695 



Buildings and 

Grounds 

2-12-71 



UM/Worcester 
Medical School- 
Land Purchase 
Wigwam Hill 



UM/Worcester-- 
Shaw Building 



City of 
Waltham Re: 
Field Station 



3696 



Buildings and 

Grounds 

2-12-71 



COMMITTEE 



Death of Frank 
Prentice Rand 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

the land. Also, the area in question is needed by the Field Station 
for buffer purposes, for drainage of water used for research purposes, 
and for pesticides experimentation. 

Chancellor Tippo reported the death of Frank Prentice Rand 
who had been a faculty member at UM/ Amherst for 46 years. Several 
letters have already been received, the Chancellor said, suggesting 
the naming of the Fine Arts Building now under construction for 
Professor Rand. Brief disucssion followed concerning Mr. Rand's 
prime role as head of the Department of English; also, his strong 
influence in early student dramatic activity. The appropriateness 
of naming of the Fine Arts Building theaters for him rather than the 
entire building was explored. No action was taken at this time. 

The meeting was adjourned at 3:20 p.m. 




Robert J.( McCartney 
Secretary, Board of Truste 




I 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON FACULTY AND 

EDUCATIONAL POLICY 
February 17, 1971, 11:00 a.m., Room 403, Statler Hilton, Boston 



PRESENT: Trustees and Trustee Staff : 

Chairman Troy, President Wood; Trustees Abrams , Boyden, 
Elters, Lambson, and Maginnis; Secretary McCartney 

Visiting Trustee : Mr. Crowley 

From UM/Amherst : Chancellor Tippo, Associate Provost 
Gluckstern, Dean Appley, Associate Deans Gentile and 
Camerino of the Graduate School; Acting Dean Allen of 
Arts and Sciences; Acting Dean Alfange, Faculty of Social 
and Behavioral Sciences; Professor Plumstead 

From UM/Boston : Dean Hoopes, Professor Broderick, repre- 
senting the Faculty Senate 



Chairman Troy called the meeting to order at 2:05 p.m. 

He called upon Chancellor Tippo, UM/Amherst, to present 
nominations for appointment to key positions in the central UM/Amher|st 
administration and in the College of Arts and Sciences. 

Chancellor Tippo said that he was recommending the appoint- 
ment of Dr. Robert Gluckstern as Vice Chancellor of Academic Affairs 
and Provost--UM/ Amherst . The search for a nominee in this position 
had started in accordance with the recommended faculty procedure 
last fall, and the search followed the selection procedure outlined 
in the so-called Morris Document. That is, the committee was com- 
posed of five faculty members selected by the Faculty Senate, five 
faculty members nominated by the Chancellor, and four undergraduates 
and one graduate student on the committee. This group met a number 
of times throughout the year. The Chancellor wrote letters to all 
of the Deans and Department Heads and other key staff members invit- 
ing the submission of names for the post. Thirty or forty nomi nations 
were received; persons from outside the campus were screened; and 
one individual was invited to visit from outside the campus. 

La?st week, the search committee made the unanimous recom- 
mendation that Associate Provost Gluckstern be awarded the position 
of Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs and Provost. 

Dr. Gluckstern has been Associate Provost for a year and 
a h«"l.fi„ Acting Provost for one year. He did his undergraduate work 
at CCNY in Engineering, received the Ph.D. from MIT in Physics, and 
spent one postdoctoral year at the University of California at 
Berkeley. He also spent one year at Cornell and fourteen years at 
Yale University prior to coming to UM/Amherst in 1964 as Head of the 
Department of Physics. Chancellor Tippo said that Dr. Gluckstern 
did an extraordinary job in building up the Physics Department. He 
recommends this appointment with great enthusiasm. Additionally, 



369 



"7, 



Faculty and 
Educational 
Policy 
2-17-71 



UM/Amherst- - 
Nominees for 
Vice Chancellor 
for Academic 
Affairs and 
Provost; Dean, 
Faculty of 
Humanities 
and Fine Arts, 
and Acting 
Dean, Faculty 
of Natural 
Sciences and 
Mathematics ; 
also Dean of 
the Faculty 
of Social and 
Behavioral 
Sciences-- 
College of 
Arts and 
Sciences 



3698 

Faculty and 
Educational 
Policy 
2-17-71 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

the subtitle of "Provost" is affixed to the title of Vice Chancellor 
so that the imcumbent may receive the benefits accruing to this 
title by law under the so-called 17, bill which exempts the Provost 
from the state salary ceiling. 

The Chancellor invited Associate Provost Gluckstern to 
present the remaining nominations. 

Dr. Gluckstern observed that, on August 10, 1970, the 
Division of the College of Arts and Sciences into three faculties was 
approved by the Board of Trustees. Search committees for heads of 
these faculties were appointed and met on August 17, in accordance 
with the procedure set in the Morris Document. 

Dr. Gluckstern met with the search committee which was 
composed of three members elected by the Executive Committee of the 
College of Arts and Sciences, three appointed by the Chancellor and 
Acting Provost, and three students (two undergraduates and one grad- 
uate student) . 

Additionally, he met with the Humanities and Fine Arts 
Selection Committee, and they unanimously recommended that Dr. Jeremi 
Allen be named Acting Dean while a search was conducted to fill this 
position on a permanent basis. 



Search committees of the two other faculties in the Arts 
and Sciences were then brought together and asked whether they wishec 
to have separate persons as head of their faculties during the interim 
search period, but they endorsed Dr. Allen as Acting Dean of the en- 
tire College for the duration of the search. 

Subsequently, the Social and Behavioral Sciences Committee 
and the Committee for Natural Sciences and Mathematics conducted 
meetings of their own to seek out Acting Deans for their respective 
faculties. In October, the Social and Behavioral Sciences Committee 
recommended that Dean Alfange be named Acting Dean of that faculty. 

The Natural Sciences and Mathematics Committee was unsuc- 
cessful in its search for a separate Acting Head, and endorsed Dr. 
Allen as the interim Acting Dean of that faculty for the duration of 
the search. 

A general search for permanent appointees to the deanship 
in each of the three faculties ensued. In late December, the Haman- 
ities and Fine Arts Faculty Committee presented a list of outside 
candidates who should be considered; at the same time, they identified 
Dr. Allen as a very strong choice from among the campus candidates. 
Subsequently, the first five persons on the list were investigated. 
One was invited to visit the campus, but he withdrew his name from 
competition. Other names were considered by the committee and addi- 
tional information disclosed that it was not worthwhile bringing then 
to the campus. At this point, the Humanities and Fine Arts Faculty 
search committee unanimously recommended the appointment of Dr. 
Jeremiah Allen as Dean. Subsequently, Dr. Gluckstern met with Depart- 
ment Heads in this area and they also unanimously recommended Dr. Allf 



I 



ah 



I 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



3699 



Faculty and 
Educational 
Policy 



Jeremiah Allen received his AB degree from Duke University 
in 1947 in English. In 1949, he received the MA from Tufts University, 2-17-71 
and the Ph.D. degree from the University of Colorado in 1956. He was 
a member of the faculty of the University of Colorado from 1948 to 
1968, at which time he came to the University of Massachusetts/Amhers 
as Professor of English and Associate Provost. Dr. Gluckstern feels 
that Dr. Allen did an excellent job in that capacity. He has recom- 
mended Dr. Allen to Chancellor Tippo for appointment as Dean of the 
Faculty of Humanities and Fine Arts, and Dr. Tippo concurs. 

The search committee in Social and Behavioral Sciences 
arrived at a recommendation that four outside persons be invited to 
visit the campus; one withdrew; three did visit (one from Dartmouth, 
one from Delaware, and one from the University of Arizona). They 
met with the search committee, with Department Heads, with faculty 
and with students. After their visit, the search committee deliberated 
and then recommended that Dean Alfange be named Dean of the Faculty 
of Social and Behavioral Sciences. Following this, Associate Provost 
Gluckstern spoke with Department Heads in this area and received a 
strong endorsement of Dr. Alfange. 

Dr. Alfange received his AB degree at Hamilton College in 
1950; his MA degree at the University of Colorado in 1960; his Ph.D. 
degree at Cornell University in 1967. His field is Constitutional 
Law. He was instructor and assistant professor at Lafayette College 
from 1963 to 1967, and has been at UM/ Amherst as assistant and asso- 
ciate professor since 1967 in the Government Department. He has been 
active in the Faculty Senate and, last spring, was chairman of the 
Emergency Advisory Committee. Dr. Gluckstern is pleased to endorse 
this appointment strongly, and has recommended it to Chancellor Tippo 
who concurs. 

Chairman Troy queried whether Dr. Allen is currently handling 
the Acting Deanship of the Faculty of Natural Sciences and Mathematic 
The response was affirmative. The search committee in that area has 
iecided it wished to investigate more candidates before making a recoi|i 
nendation. 



President Wood noted that the recommendations before the coifr 
nittee today have been discussed with him. His official position is 
that the courtesy of this communication is appreciated, but the 
responsibility for recommendation of these staff members on each campi. 
Ls that of the Chancellors themselves. From a personal point of view. 
le is delighted with the Chancellor's choices. 

Chairman Troy then requested that Drs . Allen, Alfange, and 
Gluckstern leave the room. 

Brief discussion followed, and it was moved, seconded and 



VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that Robert Glucksterr 
be appointed Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs and Provos 
UM, and Professor, UM, with tenure effective February 24, 
1971, as detailed in Document T71-073. 



t, 



3700 



Faculty and 
Educational 
Policy 
2-17-71 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

It was also 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that Dean Alfange 

be appointed Dean of the Faculty of Social and Behavioral 
Sciences in the College of Arts and Sciences and Associate 
Professor, UM, as detailed in Document T71-073. 

And it was further 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that Jeremiah Allen 
be appointed Dean, Faculty of Humanities and Fine Arts and 
Acting Dean, Faculty of Natural Sciences and Mathematics-- 
College of Arts and Sciences--and Professor, UM, with 
tenure, in English as detailed in Document T71-073. 

The second agenda item, Report of the Graduate School , was 
presented by Dean Appley. This is a comprehensive report, presented 
verbally with no written support document. No vote or other action 
was taken with respect to it. In order to expedite the forwarding 
of material to the Board of Trustees for the meeting of February 24, 
a digest of the Graduate School report will be sent out shortly as 
a separate addendum to these minutes. 




Robert J.I McCartney 
Secretary, Board of Trustees 




f 



i 



I 



3701 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON STUDENT ACTIVITIES 
February 17, 1971, 2:00 p.m., Room 403, Statler Hilton, Boston 

PRESENT: Trustees and Trustee Staff : 

Chairman Rowland, Present Wood; Trustees Chancier, Elters, 
Lyons, Shaler; Visiting Trustees Boyden, Crowley, Troy; 
Secretary McCartney 

From System Office : Vice President Lashman 

From UM/ Amherst : Chancellor Tippo, Vice Chancellor Bromer^; 
Deans Curtis, Field, Messrs. Darland, Forsyth. From the 
Student Senate: Miss Beharry, Messrs. Howland, Verrochi. 
From SWAP: Mr. Polumba. Other students: Misses Hanson, 
Fullerton 



Chairman Rowland convened the meeting at 2:10 p.m. 

In general remarks, she said that, in retrospect, perhaps 
the Committee on Student Activities should have been focusing more 
during the past year on policy issues in terms of student life and 
life styles rather than on specific issues and problems as they have 
arisen. Since the last meeting of the committee, she said, Vice 
Chancellor Bromery has been looking into the broader aspects of stu- 
dent life styles on a campus of some 20,000 individual students. He 
is also investigating the opportunities that may exist for accommo- 
dation of these life styles within residence halls. 

President Wood, asked to comment, observed that there were 
two possible ways of looking at the problem: (1) as a UM/ Amherst 
matter, as the only campus with substantial dormitory accommodations 
or (2) as clearly a matter of interest to, and expression of, Univer 
sity policy as a whole. The President added that he would expect to 
participate in discussions of matters of substance at times in terms 
of his office and at other times as a Trustee. 

He, as well as Chancellors and Deans and other members of 
the administration, the President continued, were sensitive to and 
appreciative of expressions of concern such as Trustee Troy's recent 
declaration of the need for Trustees to be fully informed on major 
matters. This process should ensure that full information comes froi^i 
the administration with ample time for consideration of all recom- 
mendations and of all points of view. In the past three or four 
months, the President reported, progress has been made on rearrange 
ment of some staff procedures. He emphasized again the importance 
of Trustees being assured that all points of view are responsibly 
represented, and that any alternative points of view are forwarded 
to Board members in order that all issues will have the most compre 
hensive consideration possible. 



Chairman Rowland suggested that the Committee on Student 
Activities meet again in March, prior to the meeting of the full Boaijd, 



Student 

Activities 

2-17-71 



UM/ Amherst-- 
Residence 
Halls — Coedu- 
cational and 
Others 



President 1 s 
Remarks 



3702 



Student Activities 
2-17-71 



Vice Chancellor 
Bromery' s 



COMMITTEE 



Remarks 



UM/Amherst- 
Security 



Dean Field's 
Remarks 



SWAP Committee- 
Report on Coed- 
ucational Dor- 
mitories 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Vice Chancellor Bromery 1 s report on student life will then go to all 
members of the Board in advance of the March meeting. 

Dr. Bromery next summarized events of his tenure as Direc- 
tor of Student Affairs. Events related to the Cambodian invasion 
and the student strike had forced postponement of study of the struc- 
tural organization and definition of responsibilities of individuals 
within the Office of Student Affairs until September. Since that 
time the operation of dormitories and current pressures and problems 
has been under study. Currently, Dr. Bromery said, he and Dean Field 
are making plans to restructure student affairs to be more responsive 
and functional. 

Reporting on security, Dr. Bromery said that within the 
last six weeks (since the SWAP Conference), additional funds have 
been acquired and students are now working with the security forces 
Problems of drugs and thefts have fallen markedly, which would seem 
to indicate the effectiveness of involving students with their own 
security. Also, Dr. Bromery said, he is working with Vice Chancellor 
Campion in an attempt to define the relationship between administra- 
tive and student affairs. 

Trustee Shaler asked about the current situation in regard 
to vandalism and theft in parking lots. Dr. Bromery replied that 
incidents were down but that this is possibly due to the extremely 
cold weather. An increase in parking fees, he said, will probably 
be coming before the Board in order to provide security guards to 
limit unauthorized access to parking lots. 

Dean Field next reported on various options now available 
in campus living styles. He also outlined the overall concept for a 
system which would provide the widest possible choice of type of 
dormitory accommodation to the individual student. He reviewed the 
situation across the country over the past ten years in which major 
universities have been faced with large-scale movement of students 
to off-campus housing. Some universities have had only 5 to 10 per- 
cent dormitory occupancy, he noted. 

Expressing a belief that a campus school must preserve in- 
ter action with students in residence halls, and also expressing a 
concern for "the nature of the town of Amherst," Dean Field said tha 
it is time to consider new philosophies in regard to dormitory life. 
He suggested that many types of living styles could emerge which woul|d 
give each of the fifty-two residence halls an identifiable character 
Thought is being given to a brochure which would describe the differ 
ences between houses. The hope is that a system may be worked out 
that will keep most of the students on campus. "We've come a long 
way in the past ten years," Dean Field said, "and we are now reachin; 
a point at which we can begin to describe differences in living 
arrangements to students and parents." 

Mr. Richard Polumba, of the SWAP Committee, next presented 
a report on Coeducational Residence Halls which has been researched 
since the SWAP Conference in November. As of January 1, he said, 
there are 10,500 students housed on campus. About 2,500 of these 



3703 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

are in the thirteen coeducational dormitories, Leaving 8,000 in non- 
coed dormitories. The fact that there are no freshmen in the coed 
dormitories results in a heavier concentration in the other houses. 
In some residence halls the concentration of freshmen runs to 50 -80 
percent. This results, Mr. Polumba said, in freshmen tending to 
"band together" and also excludes them from the often beneficial in- 
teraction with upperclassmen that can br achieved in a dormitory witji 
the traditional balance between classes. 



Regarding security, Mr. Polumba said that he did not have 
hard facts and figures available but that he did have a definite 
impression that there was a much lower incidence of security problems 
in coed dormitories. He felt that this was a direct result of the 
cohesiveness that tends to develop in a coeduactional residence hall 

Trustee Lyons asked if all applicants for the Orchard Hill 
Residential College could be accommodated. Dean Field replied that 
Orchard Hill tended to bea r little "over-applied," but that there were, 
in general, no particular popularity patterns distinguishable between 
dormitories. Even the age and style of the accommodations does not 
seem to matter greatly, he said. 

Dean of Women Helen Curtis expressed appreciation for Pre- 
sident Wood's remarks In regard to presentation and consideration of 
all points of view. She distributed -a memorandum indicating concern 
over admission of freshmen to coeducational dormitories, and several 
pages of quotes reinforcing this point of view. Considerable dis- 
cussion ensued on this issue. (Attached) 

Dean Curtis felt that freshmen are subject to too many 
other pressures and adjustments to make their first semester or two 
a wise time in which to live in a coeducational residence hall. She 
commented on the great freedom existing now in dormitories; more, 
she said, than many landlords would allow. She also observed that 
there seems to be a trend toward the more conservative student, seek 
ing privacy, quiet and order, moving off campus; a reversal of earlie 
trends for the student seeking no restrictions to move off-campus. 
Freshmen, Dean Curtis, felt, would benefit from having a semester or 
two to see for themselves the differences in dormitories and then to 
make a more informed choice than would be possible initially. 

Trustee Chandler pointed out that some freshmen are actually 
over twenty-one. Dean Curtis replied that the issue, of course, was 
one of stability and maturity, not actual chronological age. 

Several students present commented that they had made deci 
sions during their freshman year that coeducational dormitories offered 
a more concerned and civilized environment than other types of resi- 
dence. 

Chancellor Tippo summarized briefly reports from other cam- 
puses on coeducational dormitories. Within the past week he has talked 
to these spokesmen on other campuses: 



Student 

Activities 

2-17-71 



Reports --Other 
Campuses- 
Coeducational 
Dormitories 



3704 



Student 

Activities 

2-17-71 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

The President — Oregon State University . He reports that 
they have coeducational dormitories arranged by floors. Next fall 
they plan suite arrangements (mixed on floors). "No problems--bettei 
order, discipline, quiet." Freshmen are admitted. "Not one complair t 
within the state." 

The Dean of Faculties -- University of Oregon at Eugene . 
Floor-by-floor arrangement; also coeducational arrangements by section. 
Freshmen are involved. Regards as successful experiment. 

The Chancellor — University of California at Davis . (A con 
servative campus.) Parental approval required. "Sandwich" and mixec 
arrangements. No problems or complaints. Better morale. Plan to 
extend to fraternities. Not even any Regent complaints! Also had 
TV series on coed dorms. 

Dean Kenneth Clark — University of Rochester . "Experience 
very good." Men and women by separate corridors; also suites on 
floors. Freshmen admitted. 

Dr. Robert Glazier — Stanford University . Experience very 
good. His own son and daughter are involved in coeducational living 
experiments and he is enthusiastic. 

University of Vermont . "Sandwich arrangement." Freshmen. 

President — Washington State University . "Very good expe- 



rience. " 

University of Iowa , 
hope to fill dormitories." 



Recently coed. "Had 1,000 vacancies-- 



President Pusey's last annual report . "Experience in coed 
uactional residence living permitted last year proved a sensible 
change and is continued and expanded for this year. It is certain 
to go on." 300 Radcliffe women living in Harvard housing, and 300 
Harvard men living at Radcliffe. Radcliffe freshmen permitted; Har- 
vard freshmen are not. 

Chancellor Tippo, in conclusion, said that he felt that the 
experiment in coeducational dormitories should continue. Pointing 
out that students participate on a voluntary basis and that parental 
consent is necessary, he recommended acceptance of freshmen in coed- 
ucational residence halls. 

Vice Chancellor Bromery said that the people closest to 
and most responsible to students should make the specific recommenda 
tions and changes necessary for the evolving life styles on campus. 
The staff of his office, and that of the Dean of Students, he felt, 
are in the best position to make these decisions. 

Chairman Rowland expressed the consensus of the committee 
that Vice Chancellor Bromery present a paper at the March meeting of 
the Trustees as to how living arrangements for the various student 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

life styles may best be achieved. The Trustees could then have 
before them general policy guidelines for their consideration. 
Responsibility for implementation of these policies should then 
rest with the administration, she said, within any restrictions the 
Trustees care to set (such as parental permission, etc.). 

President Wood expressed agreement with this timetable as 
it would give him time to review total, rather than fragmented, 
policy. He made two observations: (1) that he was sensitive to the 
point of view that responsibility for implementation of policies mus 
rest with those having the most intimate knowledge on conditions and 
(2) that "pragmatism is a major American virtue," and while Chancellbr 
Tippo has stressed what other institutions are doing, it is also clear 
that Dean Curtis has presented another point of view to be considerei. 

President Wood requested Chancellor Tippo and Vice Chancellor 
Bromery to present a set of recommendations covering dormitory and 
life style problems in four areas: (1) Making explicit what they 
feel different life styles contribute to the educational pattern, 
"as it is really the process of education that we are essentially 
concerned with." Also, evidence of the importance of expression of 
living and learning experiences of different styles. (2) Speaking 
of the problme of dormitory selection: Does it belong, can it be- 
long, ought it to belong to any administration, or should it be a 
function of the student and his parents? "This moves us directly 
into the area of in loco parentis , which I feel the Board has an 
obligation to make a judgment on." (3) Dormitories as an economic 
fact of life, and the question of maintaining solvency, and (4) Dor 
mitories as a factor in good community life and existence; the im- 
protance of their being a safe, secure, pleasant way of life for four 
or more years. With this set of reasoned judgments from the Chancellor 
and his associates, the President said, and with footnotes and minor 
ity reports, we will be in a position to make the judgments we must 
make. 

Trustee Lyons expressed approval of the President's remarks 
and termed the meeting most illuminating. "But the idea of fifty- two 
life styles evolving for fifty- two dormitories is pretty nebulous," 
he said. "The ideas need more development and fresh perspectives." 

Dean Field and Miss Pepper described a "Work Week" Project 
planned by some sixty-five students over the next vacation period. 
Students, under the supervision of physical plant personnel, are to 
paint, repair furniture, and work on other dormitory projects. 

The meeting was adjourned at 3:40 p.m. 



370 



D 



Student 

Activities 

2-17-71 




Board of True tees 



Recommenda- 
tions-- 
President 
Wood 



3706 



Finance 
2-24-71 



COMMITTEE 



UM/Boston- 

Budget 

Transfer 



s UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF SPECIAL MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON FINANCE 
February 24, 1971, 11:45 a.m., Room 436, Statler Hilton, Boston 



PRESENT: Trustees and Trustee Staff : 

Chairman Pumphret, President Wood; Trustees Frechette, 
Gordon, Knowles; Secretary McCartney, Assistant Secretary 
Harman 

Administrators, Faculty, Staff and Invited Guests : 

From System Office : Vice Presidents Lashman and Phillips, 
Treasurer Johnson 

From UM/Boston : Chancellor Broderick, Vice Chancellor 
Hamilton 



Chairman Pumphret called the meeting to order at 12:05 p.m 

Chancellor Broderick expressed the need to transfer money 
within the Disadvantaged Students Program from staff personnel to 
financial aid. Brief discussion followed. 

It was then moved, seconded, and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that they approve 

a transfer of funds at UM/Boston in the amount of $10,800 
from Account No. 7416-2000-03 to Account No. 7416-2000-13. 

The meeting was adjourned at 12:20 p.m. 




lobert 
Secretary, 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON GOVERNMENT AND 

UNIVERSITY RELATIONS 
February 24, 1971, 3:00 p.m., Room 436, Statler Hilton Hotel, Boston 



PRESENT: Trustees and Trustee Staff : 

Chairman Gordon, President Wood; Trustees Croce, Troy, 
Elters; Secretary McCartney, Assistant Secretary Harman 

Administrators, Faculty, Staff, and Invited Guests : 

From System Office : Vice Presidents Lashman and Phillips; 
Treasurer Johnson, Mr. Cass 

From UM/Amherst : Chancellor Tippo, Vice Chancellor Bromer}r; 
Representing the Faculty Senate, Professor Howards, Mr. 
Howl and 

From UM/Boston: Chancellor Broderick, Vice Chancellor 
Hamilton 

From UM/Worcester : Dean Soutter 



Chairman Gordon called the meeting to order at 3:00 p.m. 
and announced the only item on the agenda, a report by Mr. Cass on 
legislative activities of the 1971 session related to the University 

Mr. Cass distributed two documents to the committee at 
their request: (1) a summary of all bills of interest to the Univ- 
ersity categorized by content and hearing date, and (2) a compendium 
of House bills proposing expulsion or discharge for students or fac- 
ulty engaging in a demonstration resulting in a breach of the peace. 
The Chairman requested that the Secretary send copies of the former 
document to the Board of Trustees. 

Mr. Cass couched his assessment of the University's pros- 
pects in the Legislature in the context of the state of the economy 
in the nation and the Commonwealth. He noted the history of the 
budgetary process in the state and assessed the present position of 
the University budget in that process. There is at least a month 
before the University's budget is taken up by the Ways and Means 
Committees of the House and Senate, sufficient time to take our case 
before the legislature. 

The Chancellors and Dean Soutter commented on the effects 
of the Governor's budget recommendation on their operations. Dean 
Soutter stated that he will have completed his analysis next week. 
However, preliminary studies show a particular problem in fulfilling 
our commitment for the second-year class. Chancellor Tippo said that 
the Governor asked for savings of a million dollars in the UM/Amhers : 
budget with particularly severe cuts in special programs. Chancellor 
Broderick said that UM/Boston' s budget was 13% below the University's 
requested amount. Particularly hard hit was the outfitting of the 
new library at Columbia Point. 



370? 



Government & 
University 
Relations 
2-24-71 



Legislative 

Activities-- 

1971 



Review of 
Governor' s 
Recommended 
Budget 



3708 



Government and 
University 
Relations 
2-24-71 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

The President commented on the lean budget recommendation 
for his office. As the Governor is not supporting requests for new 
programs, the proposed Institute for Governmental Services was not 
recommended for funding. 

Chairman Gordon said that the public in Massachusetts 
"needs to be sold on public higher education." He called on Vice 
President Lashman to comment on long-range plans for University 
support. Mr. Lashman stressed the need to organize a broad-based 
group of citizens across the Commonwealth who are supportive of publ 
higher education and the University in particular. 

The meeting was adjourned at 3:45 p.m. 




)ert/J^. McCartney 
Sec re taryl,/ Board of Trustees 




UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON STUDENT ACTIVITIES 

March 15, 1971, 10:00 a.m., President's Office 

85 Devonshire Street, Boston 



PRESENT: Trustees and Trustee Staff : 

Chairman Rowland, President Wood; Trustees Chandler, Croce 
Elters, Snowden; Assist. Secretary Harman, Mrs. Hull 

Administrators, Faculty, Staff and Invited Guests : 

From System Office : Vice President Lashman 

From UM/ Amherst : Chancellor TIppo, Vice Chancellor Bromerjyj 
Dean Field, Mr. Darland; Professor John Roberts, represent- 
ing the Faculty Senate; Miss Beharry, Mr. Polumba, repre- 
senting the student body 



Chairman Rowland convened the meeting at 10:15 a.m. for 
discussion of the sole agenda item— Report on the Variety of Living 
Ace ommodat ions --UM/ Amherst -- Vice Chancellor Bromery. 

This report, written at the request of Chairman Rowland, 
had been reviewed and endorsed by Chancellor Tippo. It was distri- 
buted to the committee for their review and consideration. 

The central fact, as noted by the President, is that 3,70C 
of the 7,950 students living on campus in non-coeducational dormi- 
tories are freshmen who, under present policies, have no choice of 
alternative residences. The educational implication underscored in 
Vice Chancellor Bromery 1 s report is that the increasing isolation of 
freshmen adds to the initial difficulties of adjustment to dormitory 
life. 



Discussion followed on various aspects of the Bromery 



Report. 



President Wood asked if there was a danger of actual loss 
of variety in living experience on campus if the trust toward coed- 
ucational dormitories became too widespread. There was general 
agreement that this was unlikely to happen, due to the great diversl 
apparent in student life styles. Patterns already developing were 
cited: Mackimmie, for instance, as a very academic residence hall 
with the emphasis on study and quiet. ("If you're not serious about 
studying, they don't want you.") It was also noted that some resi' 
dence halls have already moved of their own accord toward restric- 
tions on visiting hours. It was stressed that it is the administra- 
tion's intent to protect the rights of all students by providing for 
a variety of life styles. 

Dr. Croce stressed the importance of protecting the rights 
of students who do not wish to live in a coeducational dormitory 
situation, even if these students may be in a minority. General 
agreement was expressed with this position. 



ty 



Student 

Activities 

3-15-71 



UM/Amherst- 
Residence 
Halls- 
Variety of 
Living 
Experience 



3 



Student 

Activities 

3-15-71 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Dr. Croce also suggested the possibility that freshmen 
might have the option of choosing a coeducational dormitory in their 
second, rather than their first, semester. It was pointed out, how- 
ever, that this would raise serious logistical problems in connectioiji 
with room assignments and the fiscally required 957o occupancy rate. 

Chancellor Tippo observed that the old distinctions between 
"freshmen" and "upperclassmen" are fast disappearing and, moreover, 
that increasing numbers of "freshmen" are actually veterans. 

Chairman Rowland said that she did not foresee all dormi- 
tories becoming coeducational. Rather, she said, the committee's 
objective is to provide, for the Board's consideration, a broad policy 
framework which can be implemented by the administration. 

In response to the Chairman's request for an evaluation of 
coeducational dormitories to date, Vice Chancellor Bromery said that 
in terms of a year's experience, very positive results have been 
achieved on the level of interpersonal relationships and in a lessen- 
ing of the sense of alienation inherent on a large university campus 
Also, development of social and cultural programs has "exceeded 
expectations." Some difficulties were noted- -Gorman, for instance, 
where the ratio of male to female students is poor. Additional 
experience has shown flaws in some of the original proposals that 
can now be corrected. 

Trustee Snowden called attention to the fact that black 
students were not specifically mentioned in the report. Vice Chan- 
cellor Bromery said in reply that he felt that the concerns of the 
black students on this particular issue would be the same as those 
of all students. 

Dr. Croce noted the recent formation of a Student Senate 
committee that is concerned with "student responsibilities" rather 
than with "student rights." He commended Glenn Elters for taking 
the lead in this direction. 

Miss Beharry commented on the dynamism of the UM/ Amherst 
campus. This dynamism, she said, when delayed by the necessity of 
waiting for Trustee decisions, causes frustrations and brings on 
unrest. It is important, she felt, that staff people be in a position 
to give real and immediate assurance and assistance as situations 
and problems arise. 

Mr. Polumba, Commenting on the concern previously expresses 
over a. possible trend toward coeducational dormitories resulting in 
conformity, said that he did not think this would ever happen. 
"Students," he said, "have different needs at different times." 

President Wood noted that the trend of the discussion 
emphasized the basic objectives of the Trustees, which are to provide 
opportunity for variety in living experience for students and to avo: d 
the ananymity of "the man in the gray flannel suit." 



! 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Dean Field summarized the year's experience with coeduca- 
tional residence halls as successful and as worth trying. Much, he 
said, has been learned from the experience. A recent meeting held 
on campus by invitation for parents was well attended and generated 
enthusiastic discussion of many issues. Much parental interest was 
evidenced, he said, in regard to student life styles and opportunities, 
for varied living experience. Some parents of residents in coeduca- 
tional dormitories have volunteered to return to talk to future parenjts' 
meetings . 

The importance of the requirement that parental permission 
must be obtained for the student under 21 desiring to live in a coed- 
ucational dormitory was emphasized. Dean Field outlined the procedures 
involved. The information sent out by the Admissions Office at the 
time of acceptance includes a date for the Summer Orientation Program 
(required of all freshmen), basic information as to types of residence 
halls, and an invitation to parents to attend the parents' meeting 
during the orientation session. If the student indicates that he is 
interested in living in a coeducational dormitory, the parents must 
appear at a campus meeting . Parents later receive a card for signature, 
which must be filed in the Dean of Students Office. 



Trustee Chandler asked if a complete description of the 
various types of residence halls was available. Mr. Polumba replied 
that, through the efforts of Mr. Pascarelli, Editor of the Collegian , 
a very informative booklet on this subject and other aspects of stude 
life, is in preparation. 

Mr. Elters said that he felt that the Board of Trustees had 
acted responsibly in their approach to coeducational dormitories but 
that he now hopes that authority for implementation of policies can 
be given to the Administration. 

Dr. Croce stated that he was willing to reconsider his po- 
sition. He reemphasized, however, the Board's right to make judgment 
as it is empowered by law to do so and indeed has this responsibility 
The University, he said, belongs to the state and not to the students 
He expressed agreement with "students running their own show" whereve 
possible if they are willing, at the same time, to assume the appro- 
priate responsibilities. He referred to the recent Carnegie Report, 
in this connection, which also discusses student responsibilities. 

After further discussion, and upon motion made and seconded 
it was then 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that they authorize 
the development of academic and social programs in the 
residence halls and encourage student participation in dor- 
mitory governance, formulation of academic and social pro- 
gram policies, and the development of management and resi- 
dence hall program budgets; 



3711 



Student 

Activities 

3-15-71 



cit 



3712 



Student 

Activities 

3-15-71 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Further, to authorize the Chancellor of the University of 
Massachusetts at Amherst to approve these academic and 
social programs as recommended by the Vice Chancellors 
including all undergraduate and graduate student living 
arrangements designed to enhance these academic and social 
programs; 

Further, to request that the Vice Chancellors from time to 
time make written reports concerning the developmental 
stages of the academic and social program implementation 
to the Board of Trustees through the Chancellor of the 
Amherst campus and the President of the University of Mas- 
sachusetts; 

Further, that the Board of Trustees is on record as strongljy 
encouraging the faculty of the University of Massachusetts 
at Amherst to cooperate and participate in the development 
of the residence halls as living-learning centers in concerjt 
with the students and the student affairs staff; 

And finally, that the Board of Trustees recognizes the 
benefits of and encourages variety in the development of 
housing opportunities with the concurrent academic and 
social program as mentioned above. Implementation to be 
the responsibility of the Administration on the Amherst 
campus through the Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs within 
the following guidelines established by the Board of Trustees 
for coeducational living: (1) voluntary participation; 
(2) meeting with parents, students, and administrators be 
fore dormitory plans may be approved; and (3) parental 
permission for those students under 21 years of age. 

Motion carried unanimously . 

The meeting was adjourned at 11:40 a.m. 



f 



\ 




Dert 
Secretary, 




(cCartney 
ard of Truste 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON FACULTY AND 
EDUCATIONAL POLICY 
March 15, 1971, 1:15 p.m., President's Office 
85 Devonshire Street, Boston, Mass. 

PRESENT: Trustees and Trustee Staff : 

Chairman Troy, President Wood; Trustees Elters, Maginnis; 
Assistant Secretary Harman, Mrs. Hull 

Administrators, Faculty, Staff, and Invited Guests : 

From UM/ Amherst : Chancellor Tippo, John Roberts, repre- 
senting the Faculty Senate 

From UM/Boston : Chancellor Broderick, Dean Hoopes; Donald 
Costello, Director of Admissions 

From UM/Worcester : Dean Soutter 



Chairman Troy convened the meeting at 1:15 p.m. 



lly 



The first item considered by the committee was a proposal 
made by Chancellor Broderick that Vice Chancellor Hamilton be forma 
appointed as Lecturer in Politics, UM/Boston. The Vice Chancellor 
has been teaching a course in politics without compensation for thes 
additional duties. He has also, the Chancellor pointed out, been 
serving for two years without a salary increase. A salary adjustment 
is suggested that will be commensurate with the current teaching loai 
Both President Wood and Vice President Phillips concur in approving 
the proposed appointment. 



The committee, after disucssion of the matter, took no ac- 
tion. Chairman Troy approved of the proposed adjustments but expresbed 
the need for clearer guidelines to be used within the salary struc- 
ture imposed by the state. He will place the policy issues involved 
informally before the Board for consideration. 

Dean of Faculty, UM/Boston, Robert Hoopes, asked that the 
committee recommend approval of a merit increase to Professor Nevin 
Weaver. Due to an oversight, Professor Weaver was missed during the 
regular merit increase review in December and January. President 
Wood and Chancellor Broderick have approved the proposed increase. 

After brief discussion, it was moved, seconded, and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that they approve a 
merit increase of $1,500 to Professor Nevin Weaver, UM/ 
Boston, effective retroactively February 1, 1971. 

Upon a query by Dean Hoopes, Chairman Troy noted that ap- 
pointments of only top departmental positions are brought to the 
attention of the Committee on Faculty and Educational Policy. He 
noted that Dean Soutter had been most considerate in keeping the 



3713 



Faculty and 
Educational 
Policy 
3-15-71 



UM/Bos ton- 
Vice Chancellor 
Broderick, 
2 Appointment 



UM/Boston-- 
Prof. Nevin 
Weaver, Merit 
Increase 



UM/Worcester- 
Policy on 
Appointments 



3714 



F & EP 
3-15-71 



COMMITTEE 

UM/Boston-- 
Appointment, 
Dr. Bates Lowry, 
Professor and 
Head of Dept. 
of Art 



UM/Worcester- 

Faculty 

Appointments 



UM/Amherst-- 

Academic 

Appointments 



Admissions 
Policy 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

committee informed of the development of the Medical School by dis- 
cussing all high-level appointments with the Trustees. Chairman 
Troy observed that, while it is necessary to bring only the highest 
level appointments to the committee, any information which "educates" 
the committee members is most helpful. 

Dean Hoopes noted for the record the appointment of Dr. 
Bates Lowry as Professor and Chairman of the Department of Art at 
UM/Boston. Dr. Lowry has a most distinguished record as a member of 
the faculties at the Institute of Fine Arts, New York University, the 
University of California at Riverside, and as head of the art depart- 
ment at Brown University. He also organized the rescue of Italian 
art after the 1966 floods in Florence and has served as Director of 
the Museum of Modern Art. He is currently a member of the Institute 
for Advanced Study at Princeton. 

Dean Soutter announced five appointments to the faculty of 
the Medical School. These are noted for the record: 



Richard F. Walton, M. D. 



Ettore DeGirolami, M. D. 



Leonard S. Gottlieb, M.D. 
Dieter H. Keller, M.D. 



Assistant Professor of 
Community Medicine 

Clinical Asst. Professor 
of Pathology 

Lecturer in Pathology 

Clinical Associate in 
Pathology 



f 



Edward P. Richardson, Jr., M.D. Lecturer in Neuropathology 

In regard to these five appointments, Dean Soutter noted that only 
the first has been made on a salaried basis; the other four are serv- 
ing as consultants, without compensation. The Dean was complimented 
on having been able to attract such outstanding members of the 
medical profession to the teaching and consulting staff on a volun- 
tary basis. 

Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs and Provost, Dr. 
Gluckstern, reported two academic appointments at UM/ Amherst. Profes 
sor Carleton L. Reed will replace Professor Wolfgang Paulsen as Head 
of the Department of German Language and Literature. Professor 
Robert H. McNeal was appointed as Head of the History Department. 
Search committees are working to fill vacancies in Economics, Romance 
Languages, Mathematics, Agriculture and Food Economics, and the Physijcs 
Department. 

Chairman Troy remarked that the committee had requested a 
report from the Boston campus for purposes of information and defini- 
tion of policy. The Chairman noted that the Trustees had been con- 
cerned at their Hyannis meeting with the statewide, multi-instructioqal 
context within which the University's admissions policies must fall 



I 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Questions were raised as to the University vs. the State system, suc|i 
as, "Is the University of Massachusetts admissions policy like that 
of California?" 

Chancellor Broderick introduced the Director of Admissions 
at UM/Boston, Donald Costello, who submitted to the committee the 
Admissions Report--1965-70--The First Six Years . Under Mr. Costello 
direction, the Chancellor noted, admissions procedures had evolved 
from a branch operation of UM/ Amherst to a totally independent pro- 
cess. This year marks the first for use of a completely separate 
admissions form for UM/Boston. Mr. Costello made an oral presenta- 
tion from the report (Document T71-083 ) . The Director of Admissions 
presented the historical development of the Boston admissions office 
noted the geographical distribution of our Boston students, and des 
cribed the increasingly competitive situation faced by applicants to 
the Boston campus. 

Mr. Costello reviewed the six years of operation of UM/ 
Boston, from the opening date in 1964-65 when all qualified applicants 
were accepted, to 1970-71 when 2,000 students were accepted out of 
2,400 applicants, through the current year when qualified applicants 
are being turned away. (Applications are up 1,000 over last year.) 
It has been necessary to move the closing date for applications up, 
from the end of April last year to March 1 for 1971. Transfer stu- 
dents now number over 400, with from 3 to 4 percent from out-of-stat 

In response to the Chairman's inquiry as to the relative 
importance attached to SAT scores vs. rank in class, Mr. Costello 
said that class rank was considered the most important standard for 
evaluation. 

Chancellor Broderick noted that age is the best variable-- 
that students over 20 perform better on the average than do younger 
students. He outlined a policy that has been developed at UM/Boston 
in regard to some of these older students which is based on perfor- 
mance rather than on record. Admission, if record of achievement is 
poor, can be based on recommendation, personal interview, and sub- 
sequent performance. Admission for a trial semester is as a "specia 
student"; some fifty students per year are in this category. 

Chairman Troy asked how well UM/Boston is known, and by 
what standards. The Chancellor, in reply, stated that UM/Boston is 
known for (1) a quality program, (2) outstanding faculty, and (3) 
small classes. He noted that students are transferring in increasing 
numbers from private institutions. 

The fact that the current UM/Boston program is "locked intc 
Liberal Arts, and the need for other programs, was noted by Mr. Cos- 
tello. This, he said, means that some 90 percent of students are 
preparing for graduate school. He also noted the support and assis- 
tance given to the Admissions Office by the Faculty Advisory Committee, 
This committee, under the leadership of Dr. Nevin Weaver, developed 
the admissions policies and maintains very close contact with the 
Director of Admissions through weekly meetings. 



3715 



F & EP 
3-15-71 



UM/Boston-- 
Admissions 
Report (Doc, 
T71-083) 



3716 



F & EP 
3-15-71 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

The Chairman next inquired as to the distribution of stu- 
dents: "Where do they come from?" Mr. Costello replied that 40 per- 
cent come from within the city limits of Boston with the remainder 
commuting varying distances. This distribution, he noted, has remained 
standardized for the last six years. 

The question of policy on admissions for students from the 
city vs. those from the suburbs was raised by the Chairman. If it 
is necessary to make this choice, students from within the city are 
given preference. 

Chairman Troy expressed appreciation to Mr. Costello for 
the interesting information provided during the discussion of the 
report. 

The meeting was adjourned at 2:20 p.m. 




Robert J 
Secretary, 




IcCartney 
>ard of Trustees 



r 



! 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS 
March 18, 1971, 9:30 a.m., Office of the President, Boston, Mass. 



PRESENT: Trustees and Trustee Staff : 

Chairman Haigis, President Wood; Trustees Chandler, Maginriis 
Pumphret; Treasurer Johnson, Secretary McCartney, Assistart 
Secretary Harman 

Administrators, Faculty, Staff, and Invited Guests : 

From System Office : Vice President, Phillips, President's 
Office Interns Elizabeth Pugh and James Triple tt 

From UM/Amherst : Planning Officer Littlefield, Mr. Simpson 

From UM/Boston : Vice Chancellor Hamilton 

From UM/Worcester : Dean Soutter 

Chairman Haigis convened the meeting at 9:45 a.m. 

Mr. Littlefield was asked to give an informal presentation 
on the status of the Tillson Corridor/North East Street/Pelham Hill 
Road alternative to the University Bypass proposal. The Town of 
Amherst has voted to study the matter for up to an additional six 
months. The Department of Public Works has agreed to reserve state 
aid for the project during that period, after which the money will 
be released for road work limited to the Amherst campus if a suitabl|e 
alternative is not found. 

Mr. Littlefield noted that discussions with DPW indicated 
reasonable assurance that the federal commitment, together with static 
funds, could be maintained from Route 116 east to East Pleasant Stre|et, 
As to the Tillson Corridor road, DPW indicated a willingness to dis- 
cuss applying the remainder of the state commitment toward that road, 
but this would only build a part of the road suggested by the Traffic; 
Circulation Committee. He felt that substantial assistance from the 
town was needed if there was to be any hope of an increase in the 
state authorization given DPW. If this did not happen, the closing 
of North Pleasant Street would be delayed indefinitely. 

Treasurer Johnson remarked that too much delay might jeo- 
pardize any work by DPW on the Amherst campus. The Trustees express 
the need for a swift resolution so ..at this latter possibility would 
not occur. 



37i? 



Buildings 
and Grounds 
3-18-71 



Mr. Edward Simpson of the UM/Amherst Planning Office repor 
on the progress of the 1972 Single Student Housing Feasibility Study 



being conducted by Hugh Stubbins. Mr. Simpson reported that the 
study for 1972 single student housing was conducted with four objec- 
tives: (1) the housing must have a capacity for 600 students; (2) 
the units should be ready for September 1972 occupancy; (3) the hous 
ing should provide a clear alternative to existing residences; and 



UM/Amherst-- 

Circumferential 

Road 



ted UM/Amherst-- 
1972 Single 
Student Hous- 
ing Feasibil- 
ity Study 



3718 



B & G 
3-18-71 



COMMITTEE 



UM/Worcester-- 
1971 Capital 
Outlay Program 



UM/Worcester-- 
Study of Growth 



UM/Worcester- 
Te aching 
Hospital 



UM/Worcester 
School of 
Veterinary 
Medicine 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

(4) rent should be held as close to current levels as possible. Par 
Two of the Report's Procedure and Program Analyses conveyed the feel 
ing of the architects that, to meet this timetable, a fully develope< 
site would be necessary. Mr. Pubphret noted that no official docu- 
ment had been placed before the Building Authority and that maintain 
ing an April to August timetable for land acquisition and construction 
start would depend on the Authority having time to make adequate 
study and review of the proposal. 

Three housing concepts had been considered thus far in the 
study: house units, entry-suite units, and townhouses. Sketches of 
each type of building were displayed for the committee. 

The 1971 Capital Outlay Program of the Medical School was 
discussed by Treasurer Johnson and Vice President Phillips. The com 1 
mittee was reminded that in November the Board had authorized the 
President to submit a request for up to $5 million of capital outlay 
at Worcester. In February a capital outlay was requested for the 
Medical School of $1,245,000 of which $450,000 was for land acquisi- 
tion. The Treasurer reported that he was in the process of negotia- 
tion with the BBC to obtain funds for land acquisition through that 
agency. If successful, the University's capital outlay request would 
be reduced by that amount. The Governor's Office and the BHE have 
been alerted of this possibility. 

At the direction of the Trustees at their Hyannis meeting, 
the firm of Sasaki, Dawson, and DeMay, Inc., was engaged to study th^ 
planning implications of growth on the Worcester campus. The first 
preliminary report has been sent to the President and is under revie^ 
by the System Office staff. 

Dean Soutter and the President reported on their visit to 
Secretary Richardson in Washington. The National Advisory Council 
has approved approximately $800 million in projects while having onl 
$105 million appropriated. The President related that the mechanism 
of an advisory council of professionals was an excellent administra- 
tive device at a time of generous appropriations. It increased the 
possibility for professional bias during a period of scarce appro- 
priations, however. The President reported that the Secretary's 
reception was encouraging and that we would pursue the federal grant 
route to termination. A review of priorities would be made by the 
NAC on March 24. 

Dean Soutter emphasized that the use of Worcester community 
hospitals in place of a teaching hospital was an inadequate alterna- 
tive. The community hospitals are not able to respond to the teach- 
ing requirement of "elective illnesses," provide space for staff and 
students, and accept Medical School staff. 

A brief progress report was made on establishing a School 
of Veterinary Medicine. Dean Soutter said that the University of 
Connecticut, once proposed as the location for a New England States 
Veterinary Medicine School, is now prepared to have the proposed 
school located at the University of Massachusetts. 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Vice Chancellor Hamilton next presented a Progress Report - 
Columbia Point Site . He reviewed the fact that the MDC is charged 



with construction of a grade traffic interchange for Columbia Point 
at Morrissey Boulevard. Residents of the area have expressed concern 
over traffic concentration and resultant noise and air pollution and, 
as a result, a "depressed" underpass is under study. If this type of 
construction iandertaken, however, cost of the project will double. 

Speaking of the noise problem in general at the site, Vice 
Chancellor Hamilton noted that an acoustical simulation has been made 
of aircraft noise and other sound conditions expected at Columbia 
Point. An overfly every three minutes is expected (1975 conditions) 
with flights every three hours by an excessive noise jet. "White 
sound," or background noise, is also expected; this cannot be reduced], 
but is expected to be only at the noise level of a room air conditionjer. 

In response to Vice President Phillips' question as to 
whether the present solutions were satisfactory, the answer was in 
the affirmative. 



Vice Chancellor Hamilton also noted that Professor Kaplan o 
the Department of Biology, UM/Boston, has recently visited the Univ- 
ersity's Marine Science Station at Gloucester with a view toward co- 
ordination of campus programs. Dr. Hamilton expressed the opinion 
that "it would make more sense" to administer this program from Bosto^i 
rather than from Amherst. All concerned are keeping an open mind on 
this issue. 

It was noted that a joint legislative committee plans to 
carry out investigative proceedings relative to the awarding of the 
MBM contract for Columbia Point. 

Chairman Haigis mentioned problems which have arisen with 
the Belchertown project. He also called for reports on the University 
Field Stations and Nantucket. He strongly recommended that a trip be 
taken by the Committee on Buildings and Grounds to the Columbia Point 
site in early May. 



The meeting was adjourned at 11:40 a, 



m. 





Robert J. /McCartney 
Secretary, Board of Truste 




3719 



B & G 
3-18-71 
UM/Boston 
Progress Report 
Columbia Point 
Site 

Traffic 
Interchange 

Noise 
Conditions 



Marine Science 
Programs 



3720 



Executive 
4-7-71 



COMMITTEE 



University 
Legal Counsel- 
Ely, Bartlett, 
Brown & Proctor 



Cost-of-Living 
Increase— 
Chapter 116, 
Acts of 1971 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 
April 7, 1971, 4:00 p.m. , President's Office, 85 Devonshire Street 

Boston 



PRESENT: Trustees and Trustee Staff : 

Chairman Healey, President Wood: Trustees Gordon, Haigis, 
Pumphret, Rowland, Troy; Treasurer Johnson, Secretary 
McCartney, Mrs. Hull _ l 

Administrators, Faculty, Staff, and Invited Guests : 

From System Office : Vice President Lashman, Mr. Broadhurs 
Mr. Cass 

From UM/ Amherst : Chancellor Tippo 

From UM/Boston : Chancellor Broderick 

From UM/Worcester : Dean Soutter 



Chairman Healey convened the meeting at 4:00 p.m. He notedl 
that meetings have been held with the Attorney General to clarify th<! 
position of the firm of Ely, Bartlett, Brown and Proctor, as repre- 
sented by Mr. Broadhurst, in providing legal services to the Univer 
sity. Plans are under way to continue the arrangements of the past 
several years, possibly within a more formal framework. 

President Wood said Trustee action is needed to confirm, 
with respect to the University, recent legislative action authorizing 
a 6 percent cost-of-living pay increase to all state employees. This: 
increase is retroactive to December 27, 1970, and much administrative 
effort is necessary in order to implement the legislation. It is 
expected that the increase will be included in University employees' 
pay checks for April 16. 

All nonprofessional employees in the 01 and 02 categories 
will automatically get the increase. The State Controller has asked 
that the vote of the Board of Trustees be attached to the payroll 
for professional employees paid from state funds. 

Treasurer Johnson stated that employees paid from various 
Trust Fund categories who are equivalent to state-funded employees 
will receive the same 6 percent increase. This will ensure equitable 
treatment for all University employees. He noted, however, the 
proviso that, where grant or institutional or contract funds are 
involved, a recommendation and certification of availability of funds 
must be provided by the principal investigator. 

Additionally, it was pointed out that any member of the 
professional staff who came onto the payroll on or after December 27. 
1970, will not receive a 6 percent cost-of-living adjustment. Fur- 
ther, Chapter 116 of the Acts of 1971 specifically forbids any employ o 
being paid by 03 funds, or in the status of an 03 employee, from 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

receiving any cost-Of-living adjustment. All members of the committee 
concurred with this position. 



After further discussion, and on motion made and seconded, 



it was 



VOTED : In accordance with the provisions of Section 14 of Chapter 
75 of the General Laws as amended, and the provisions of 
Chapter 116 of the Acts of 1971 and the authority containejd 
therein and all other acts applicable thereto each officer 
and member of the professional staff of the University of 
Massachusetts employed in a position paid in whole or in 
part from state funds under subsidiary accounts designated 
01 and 02 shall for the period beginning December 27, 1970 
have the rate of his regular compensation otherwise paid or 
payable on December 26, 1970, increased by an amount of six 
percent but such increase shall not be applied to any salary 
rate previously fixed by vote of the Trustees for any such 
new professional employee entering the service of the Univ 
ersity of Massachusetts on or after December 27, 1970., and 
that the President of the Univetsity is hereby authorized 
to take all actions necessary or desirable to implement thtis 
Act and to also apply an increase not to exceed six percenlt 
to the regular compensation in the same manner to all mem 
bers of the professional staff and nonprofessional employees 
normally paid from other than state funds who in his judg 
ment are in categories of employment equivalent to the in 
tent and scope of said Chapter 116, provided, however, that 
in the case of those paid from institute, grant, or contract 
funds the recommendation and certification of the availability 
of funds by the conginzant principal investigator or director 
shall be a prerequisite to the payment of any such increase 

The preceding vote authorizing administrative action, and 
necessary at this time because of administrative payroll procedures 
involved, will go to the full Board of Trustees for ratification on 
April 26. 

Affiliation Agreement with Hospitals, UM/Worcester , was 
next discussed. Dean Soutter's memorandum of January 11, 1971, had 
been previously circulated, but not acted upon (Document T71-085 ) . 

Dr. Soutter said that formal approval by the Board of Trus 
tees was required as the hospital trustees must also vote on this 
matter. A binding agreement is necessary that cannot be altered 
except by further respective Trustee action. The form of agreement 
proposed is essentially a partnership which guarantees that the hos- 
pital can fulfill its community care commitments, while at the same 
time the Medical School can carry out its program of education. 
These arrangements would be expected to upgrade a hospital's residenjt 
staff and--at the same time--provide a good teaching program. 



3721 



Executive 
4-7-71 



Cost-of-Living 
Increase-- 
Chapter 116, 
Acts of 1971 



UM/ Worcester- - 
Affiliation 
Agreement with 
Hospitals 



3725 



■>. 



COMMITTEE 



UM/Worcester-- 
Affiliation 
Agreement with 
Hospitals 

UM/Boston-- 
Appointment of 
Vice Chancellor 
Hamilton as 
Lecturer in 
Politics 



Proposed 
Delegation of 
Powers 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

The form of affiliation being proposed has been approved 
by the Joint Committee on Accreditation of Medical Schools of the 
Association of American Medical Colleges and the Council on Medical 
Education of the American Medical Association. Service-to-service 
affiliation agreements will be executed on an individual basis with 
the hospitals involved, after approval of the basic form for agree- 
ment. 

Dean Soutter reviewed the status of negotiations with var- 
ious Worcester hospitals. After further brief discussion, it was 
moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that the basic Affil 
; iation Agreement, UM/Medical School and Worcester Hospital 
as detailed in Document T71-Q85 , be approved subject to 
review by legal counsel. 

The Appointment of Vice Chancellor Hamilton as Lecturer in 



Politics, UM/Boston , was discussed. President Wood noted that this 
matter had been considered by the Committee on Faculty and Educational 
Policy on March 15. No action was taken at that time because of po- 
licy issues involved. 

Vice Chancellor Hamilton has been serving in his adminis- 
trative post for two years without a salary increase. He has also 
been teaching a course in politics without compensation for the ad- 
ditional duties involved. It was agreed that the special circumstance; 
of this case merited consideration, particularly the fact that the 
Vice Chancellor's duties are a combination of administrative and 
academic duties. Appropriate compensation should be provided. 

President Wood observed that similar circumstances had 
arisen previously, and that he had discussed the situation with the 
Governor, the Senate President, the Chairman of Ways and Means, and 
the Speaker of the House. Legislation has been put forward proposin 
changes in the general compensation schedule, but a favorable outcom^ 
for this legislation is considered doubtful. 

After further discussion and on motion made and seconded, 
it was then 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that the appointment 
of Vice Chancellor Hamilton as Lecturer in Politics, UM/ 
Boston, at additional compensation be approved. 

President Wood reviewed issues requiring consideration of 
the Executive Committee and the administration within the next month 
or so. 

The first involves searching for ways for the University 
to be supportive and constructive in regard to private colleges and 
universities. Possibilities of a contract instrument are being 
explored. A statement will be forthcoming within the next few weeks 

The second is an issue within the University system. A 
memorandum on Proposed Delegation of Powers was discussed. This 
memorandum, dated April 7, 1971, was prepared by Vice President 



a 



COMMITTEE 



J 



J 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Phillips after a discussion of the issue by the Advisory Committee 
on the Future University. Essentially, an attempt is being made to 
clarify trustee-administration relationships, preserving the funda- 
mental trustee role of policy making and outlining specific adminis- 
trative responsibilities. Two major areas for clarification are: 

) system-campus relationships (2) fiduciary-fiscal and program 

lationships . 



(1) 
re 



Discussion of contingency funds was postponed to the next 
meeting of the committee. 

The President had requested Treasurer Johnson to prepare i 
paper summarizing the pros and cons of the tuition issue. Dr. Wood 
anticipates no legislative action on tuition at this session, but 
the issue remains a serious problem for the future. The President 
and Mr. Cass do not feel it is necessary for the Board to take formall 
action at this time. The President also suggests that the state and 
community college Boards of Trustees remand this and other problems 
to the Advisory Committee to the Board of Higher Education for serio|us 
professional study. 



ion 



Mr. Cass said that current bills proposing increased tuit 
have just received adverse reports in Ways and Means Committee. At 
UM/ Amherst a few days ago Speaker Bartley publicly expressed opposi- 
tion to increased tuition. Sentiment has been noted, however, among 
legislators for plans to have students "pay back" free or low-cost 
tuition. 



Chairman Healey said a fundamental question is involved as 
to whether, as Speaker Bartley suggests, it is actually the respon- 
sibility of the Board of Trustees to set tuition levels for students 
in the Commonwealth. The Chairman felt that tuition levels are a 
legislative responsibility and should not be left to the discretion 
of individual Boards of Trustees. Standards for the state on tuitioh 
levels he continued, should be set by the legislature within guide- 
lines worked out cooperatively with the severellBoards of Trustees, 
He foresees the necessity for further serious study of the entire 
question of tuition and higher education for the citizens of the 
Commonwealth. 



On the proposed Delegation of Powers 
Chairman Healey emphasized that (1) all delegat 
posed are within the provisions for delegation 
statutes of the Commonwealth, and no statutory 
(2) all delegations operate within the limitati 
on the premise that authority not specifically 
reserved to the Board of Trustees' and (3) that 
delegated will be clearly and expressly spelled 
so that there can be no misunderstandings; and 
gated may be returned to the Board of Trustees 



previously discussed, 
ions of authority pro 
provided by existing 
changes are suggested 
ons and specifically 
elegated will be 
every power to be 
out and documented 
(4) any powers dele- 
at any time. 



372 a 



Exec. Comm. 
4-7-71 



Tuition 



Proposed 
Delegation of 
Powers 



3724 



Exec. Comm. 
4-7-71 

UM/ Amherst -- 
Proposed Gift 
of Land 

COMMITTEE 

Fraternity- 
Sorority Park 



UM/Amherst-- 
Dis advantaged 
Students Pro- 
gram- -CCEBS 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Treasurer Johnson reviewed a Proposed Gift of Land , UM/ 
Amherst, in connection with a proposed purchase of land by the Univ- 
ersity of Massachusetts Building Authority. Involved is part of the 
front portion of Fraternity-Sorority Park, an area adjacent to the 
University's Amherst campus. As a part of the transaction, the 
Fraternity-Sorority Corporation, inclosing out operations, proposed 
to give the reamining Vtp acres of the front portion of the Park, 
including roads, parking areas, and utility systems to the University, 
subject to the restrictions and rights incumbent on the property. 

The consensus of the Committee was that, if the land is 
given with the restrictions discussed at today's meeting, the Board 
of Trustees would be willing to accept the gift. 

The Disadvantaged Students Program, UM/ Amherst , was next 
discussed. President Wood has recently met with Chancellor Tippo anji 
the Directors of the Program at UM/ Amherst regarding a severe finan- 
cial crisis which has developed. Support of the program was origin- 
ally divided between state and Ford Foundation funds. Foundation 
support was withdrawn last year. State support has been insufficien 
and unless additional funds can be found, the program faces curtail- 
ment. 

It was pointed out that the UM/ Amherst Disadvantaged Stu- 
dents Program is recognized as one of the most outstanding in the 
nation. It has operated for three years under considerable odds and 
is just now reaching the point of realizing some of its original goa .s 
with the graduation of the first seniors in 1971 and 1972. A decision 
must be made very soon as to whether to send out acceptances for nex 
year's freshmen. It is felt that this cannot be done without assur- 
ance of funding. $1,000,000 is felt to be the minimum needed for 
support; possibly $385,000 will come from the state allocation. Pre 
sident Wood has explored, with disappointing results, all sources of 
private funding. 



Chairman Healey and Trustee Pumphret along with other com- 
mittee members indicated that the program should be given top priori 



It was the consensus that the program will be continued and 
new students recruited for the fall semester, 1971. Chancellor Tippo 
was requested to develop a document outlining the success of the pro- 
gram to date. 

President Wood announced for Chancellor Broderick the forth 
coming recommendation of Dorothy Marshall, now acting President and 
Dean at Bryn Mawr, for appointment as Dean of Faculties and Provost, 
UM/Boston. 

The meeting was adjourned at 5:25 p.m. 




Robert (J 
Secretary 




icCartney 
rd of Truste 



:y. 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON FINANCE 

April 13, 1971, 12:30 p.m., President's Office, 

85 Devonshire Street, Boston 



PRESENT: Trustees and Trustee Staff : 

Chairman Pumphret, President Wood; Trustee Rowland; Trea- 
surer Johnson, Secretary McCartney, Assistant Secretary 
(Pro Tern) Harman, Mrs. Hull 

Administrators, Faculty, Staff, and Invited Guests: 



From System Office : 
Mr. Weinstein 



Vice Presidents Lashman and Philips; 



From UM/Amherst : Chancellor Tippo, Vice Chancellors 
Bromery and Campion; Professor James Ludtke, representing 
the Faculty Senate; Messrs. Brand, Clay, He iney 

From UM/Boston : Chancellor Broderick, Vice Chancellor 
Hamilton 

From UM/Worcester : Mr. Stockwell 

From Standish, Ayer & Wood, Investment Counsel : Mr. John 
Wood 



The meeting was convened by Chairman Pumphret at 1:05 p.m 



Mr. John Wood, President of Standish, Ayer & Wood, Inc. 
Investment Counsel, discussed the current investment market situatic 
and the outlook for the future. No immediate changes in the portfoli 
were proposed, although Mr. Wood suggested that some reductions might 
be made in maturities of long-term holdings. 



Treasurer Johnson reviewed the present status of Murray D 
Lincoln Estate negotiations. He has recently discussed these holdings 
with Mr. P. L. Thornbury, Trustee of the Estate. A memorandum of 
their meeting of February 23, 1971, and Mr. Thornbury 1 s subsequent 
letter of April 9, 1971, were distributed ( Document T71-087 ) . Although 
the estate has the legal status of a "living trust" and may be ter- 
minated at any time, Mr. Johnson recommended, however, that the pro- 
posals outlined in this memorandum for liquidation of the estate be 
followed. Securities already purchased for the University by the 
Trustees of the estate will now be turned over to the University alor. 
with other securities and investments. Management of other holdings 
will be as outlined in the Thornbury memorandum. 



After further discussion, and on motion made and seconded, 



it was 



3725 



Finance 
4-13-71 



Report of 
n Investment 
o Counsel 



Murray D. 
Lincoln 
Estate-- 
Liquidation 



3726 



Finance 
4-13-71 



COMMITTEE 

Quarterly 
Report- 
Treasurer 



Automated Cash 
Disbursement 
Procedure and 
Banking 
Arrangements 



UM/Amherst- 

Budget 

Transfers 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

VOTED: To recommend to the Board of Trustees that the Treasurer 
be authorized to proceed with liquidation of the Murray 
D. Lincoln Estate within the recommendations of the Thorn- 
bury Memorandum of March 9, 1971 (Document T71-087 ) . 

Discussion followed on the Quarterly Report of the Treasure 
distributed by Mr. Johnson. Chairman Pumphret raised the question oi 
including transfers between subsidiary accounts for the various cam- 
puses in the report. There was general agreement that this should 
be done in the future (Document T71-086 ) . 

Automated Cash Disbursement Procedure and Banking Arrange - 
ments for Trust Funds were also reviewed by the Treasurer. A positic 
paper was distributed detailing procedures as they have been approvec 
by the Working Groups on Fiscal Affairs and on Automated Data Process 
ing in preparing for computerization. 

Trust Fund accounts will be maintained in various banks, bit 
all disbursements will be made from the Worcester County National Bar] 
This bank has agreed to handle the disbursement account and to provice 
twice-daily messenger service to the Amherst and Boston campuses wit! 
no service charge to the University. It is expected that these pro- 
cedures will also apply to state funds as soon as methods can be de- 
veloped. 

After further discussion, it was moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that they approve 
initiation of the Automated Trust Fund Cash Disbursement 
Procedure on or about July 1, 1971, and the establishment 
of the single Trust Fund Cash Disbursement Account in the 
Worcester County National Bank. 

On Budget Transfers, UM/ Amherst , a memorandum from Presidert 
Wood dated April 12, 1971, was distributed as background information 
on the various transfers being requested by the System Office from 
the three campuses. 

Mr. Clay reviewed background on the various Amherst requests, 
After discussion, it was moved, seconded and 



VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that transfer of 
$45,000 from account 01 to account 02 be approved. 

Purposes: $30,000 for additional overtime, including increased 
weekend police patrols; $15,000 for terminal pay for 
sabbatical leave replacements. 

It was also 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that transfer of 
$45,000 from account 01 to account 03 be approved. 

Purpose: For the President's Office. 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

It was further 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that the following 
transfers be approved: 

a) $1,640 from account 04 to account 10; 

b) $3,600 from account 06 to account 10, 

c) $8,233.30 from account 09 to account 10, 

d) $4,000 from account 13 to account 10. 

Purpose: $9,380 for the President's Office; the balance ($8, 093. [30) 
for the Physical Plant and miscellaneous over-runs. 

It was also 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that the transfer 
of $50,000 from account 01 to account 14 be approved. 

Purpose: To meet essential telephone costs in the President's 
Office ($13,120) and to cover postage rate increases 
and postage over-runs ($36,880). 

Transfers of Non-state Funds were also requested and reviewed 
by Mr. Clay. After discussion and upon motion made and seconded, it 
was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that the transfer of 
$211,000 from the Institutional Allowance Account — General 
to the Disadvantaged Students Program be approved. 

This amount is required during the current fiscal year for 
financial aid for disadvantaged students. 

It was also 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that the transfer of 
$16,296.67 from the Trust Fund Interest-Reserve to Trust 
Fund Interest-Legal Fees be approved. 

An invoice in the amount of $31,296.67 has been received 
from Ely, Bartlett, Brown & Proctor for legal services rendered in 
1968, 1969, and 1970. The amount previously budgeted for legal 
expense in the current fiscal year was $15,000. Of the $31,296.97, 
$3,169.47 is for the System Office; $15,841.14, for Amherst; $11,216 
for Boston; and $1,069.80, for Worcester. 

Mr. Clay next briefed the committee on Lincoln and Univer - 
sity Apartments — Termination of Leases . In order to implement new 
policies limiting occupancy of these units to married students (excebt 
for 5 percent occupancy by short-term faculty and staff appointees), 
it is necessary to terminate current tenancy agreements. Occupants 
were told of the impending change in policy last summer; formal notice 
of intent is now being given. 



372? 

Finance 
4-13-71 



UM/Amherst- 

Budget 

Transfers 



26, 



UM/Amherst-- 
Lincoln and 
University 
Apartments-- 
Termination 
of Leases 



3728 



Finance 
4-13-71 



COMMITTEE 



UM/Amherst-- 
Additional 
Appropriation- 
Water 
Deficiency 



UM/Amherst-- 
Projected 
Increases- 
Room and Board 
Charges 



UM/ Amherst- - 
Board Rates 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

After discussion, it was moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that, in order to 
implement the policy of the Boa rd of Trustees to provide 
housing primarily for married students at Lincoln Apartmeni: 
University Apartments, and North Village, on the Amherst 
campus, the administration at Amherst is authorized to ter 
minate present faculty and staff tenancies consistent with 
appropriate notice under any existing tenancy agreements; 
further, future tenancies of said promises shall be limitec. 
to married students except that not more than 5 percent of 
the total available units of all three apartment complexes 
may be leased to short-term faculty and short-term staff 
appointees for lease terms not to exceed one year, and the 
apportionment of the said faculty and staff tenancies among; 
the three apartment complexes shall be at the discretion ol: 
the administration at Amherst. 

An Additional Appropriation--Water Deficiency, UM/ Amherst , 
was reviewed by Mr. Clay. Water meters installed by the town oper- 
ated inaccurately throughout portions of the years 1967 and 1968. 
Based on estimates provided by a professional engineering firm, the 
amount necessary to cover this deficiency is $61,000 for water used 
by the University during this period and one-half of that amount for 
sewer charges or a total of $91,650. It will be necessary for the 
legislature to approve funds to meet this obligation, as it is a 
prior year's expense. 

After discussion, and upon motion made and seconded, it was 



VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that a request for ar 

Additional Appropriation, UM/ Amherst, in the amount of 

$91,650 for a Water Deficiency Charge to the Town of Amherst 
be approved. 

Vice Chancellor Campion presented a brief report on the pre 
liminary figures projected for necessary increases in room and board 
charges in fiscal 1972. In developing these projections, he has 
worked closely with Vice Chancellor Bromery. The proposals have alsc 
been discussed in detail with student leaders and with other student 
groups. It was pointed out that the present board rate of $530 has 
not changed during the last two years, during a period of rising bas 
costs. 



f 



Five different alternative proposals have been prepared anc 
are already under consideration by various student groups on campus 
Each includes recognition of basic cost increases as well as the neec 
to li&rida'fce the $480,000 deficit in operations which has been inc 
over the past three years or so. 



uried 



The proposals in summary are: 
1. Continuation of present basic 15-meal plan--97o increase to $f 



ic 



I 1 



] 



COMMITTEE 



J 



J 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Same as (1) bat with fixed building fee of $62 for each 
student living in the residence halls whether or not he 
chooses to eat in the Dining Commons --77o increase to $568. 

Choice of 10- or 15-meal ticket with $62 building fee-- 
no increase for 10 meals, 147. increase to $602 for 15 
me a 1 s . 

Same as (3) without building fee--37o and 167, increases 
for the 10- and 15-meal options. 

Mandatory only for Freshmen and Sophomores- -137, increase 
to $600. 



Under all of these proposals the students have been offere 
an option on the limiting of seconds which in each case would have 
the effect of reducing the fee by $16. 

Chairman Pumphret noted the difficulties involved in the 
proposed financing when some of the dining commons are permanently 
financed. 

Mr. Campion also reviewed fee changes proposed for the 
Residence Halls. These proposals have been presented in detail to 
student leaders and have been published in the Collegian, along with 
the major supporting reasons. 

The following are basic points involved in these proposed 
fee increases : 

--An occupancy level at 957, of full-rated capacity. 

--The effect of the substantial increases in labor, materials, 
and utilities costs already experienced and anticipated 
for the coming year. 

--The changes over actual FY71 costs in annual debt servic ; 
in the Building Authority projects due to recent bonding 
and to the addition of the entire Warneke complex. Also 
FY71 actual payments will include only about 10 months o 
interest expense because of the bonding in early May. 

--Inclusion of two major renovations in both the Residence 
Hall Trust Fund proposals during FY72 (old state dormi- 
tories) . 

--Proposal A (Residence Halls) in each case includes less 
money for both labor and materials than Proposal B items 
as : 

--Projects like Work Week. 
--Non-major refurbishing jobs. 

--Furniture replacement and repair not included 
in major renovation. 



3729 



Finance 
4-13-71 



UM/ Amherst 
Residence 
Hall Charges 



3730 



Finance 
4-13-71 



COMMITTEE 



UM/ Amherst— 
Campus Center 
Fee Increase 



UM/Boston— 

Transfers 

Between 

Subsidiary 

Accounts 



UM/Worcester— 

Transfers 

Between 

Subsidiary 

Accounts 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Two alternative plans have been developed for Residence 



Hall Fees: 



Now 



Proposed 
Plan A Plan B 



Residence Hall Trust Fund 
(old dorms except Lewis 
and Thatcher plus Brett 
and Gorman—Project 1) 

Projects 2-10 and Lewis 
and Thatcher 

». 
^Project 12 



$500 

560 
650 



$550 

610 
700 



$565 

625 
715 



i 



-'''No recognition has been made of a possible Federal interest sub- 
sidy as the amount of such subsidy is unknown and whether any of 
it may be applicable to FY72. 

The Campus Center Fee increase cannot yet be accurately 
determined, Mr. Campion said, due to unresolved financing of the Park 
ing Garage and permanent financing of the Campus Center. He felt, 
however, that a $15 increase is probable, if the other problems can 
be solved. 



Transfers — Subsidiary Accounts, UM/Boston , were presented 
by Vice Chancellor Hamilton. He noted that operation of the UM/Bostc|n 
bookstore is changing from management as a branch operation of the 
UM/ Amherst bookstore to an autonomous operation. Some changes in 
financing will be necessary. 

After discussion, and on motion made and seconded, it was 



VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that the transfer 
of funds between subsidiary accounts, UM/Boston, as deta 
herewith be approved: 



iled 



Transfer Requests: 

7416-1001-08 
7416-1001-11 
7416-1001-16 



From 
$2,000.00 
$5,000.00 



To 



$7,000.00 



Purpose of Request: 



To provide funds needed for (a) University 
Catalogue, Boston Campus; and (b) Special Print- 
ing of Boston Campus Forms. 



Transfers— Subsidiary Accounts, UM/Worcester , were presented 
by Mr. Stockwell. The requested transfer is necessary because of 
expense for utilities exceeding estimates for the first year of norma 
operation of the Shaw Building. 



I 



J 



COMMITTEE 



J 



J 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

After discussion, it was moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that the following 
transfer between subsidiary accounts at UM/Worcester be 
approved: 

Account 14 to Account 08 

$10,000 $10,000 

The meeting was adjourned at 2:45 p.m. 




Robert J. 
Secretary, Boa' 



,artney 
of Trustees 




3731 



Finance 
4-13-71 



373 1 



> 



Faculty and 
Educational 
Policy 
4-16-71 



COMMITTEE 



UM/Amherst-- 
Master of 
Public Admin- 
istration 
Degree 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON FACULTY AND 

EDUCATIONAL POLICY 

April 16, 1971, 12:30 p.m., President's Office 

85 Devonshire Street, Boston 



PRESENT: Trustees and Trustee Staff : 

Chairman Troy, President Wood; Trustees Abrams, Maginnis, 
Shaler; Secretary McCartney, Assistant Secretary (Pro Tern) 
Harman 

Administrators, Faculty, Staff, and Invited Guests : 

From System Office : Vice Presidents Lashman and Phillips; 
Mr. Edelman, President's Committee on the Future University 

From UM/ Amherst : Chancellor Tippo, Vice Chancellor for 
Academic Affairs and Provost Gluckstern; Deans Appley and 
Spielman; Representing the Faculty Senate Professors Howardjs, 
Plumbstead, and Roberts; Director of Continuing Education 
Venman; Director of International Programs Burn; Professors 
Gordon, Lundberg, Mainzer, Procopio, Ryavec 

From UM/Boston: Dean Hoopes 

From UM/Worcester : Dean Soutter 

From Waltham Field Station : Dr. Naegele 



Chairman Troy convened the meeting at 1:05 p.m. He noted 
that discussion of some items on the agenda was being deferred and 
particularly requested that reports on the Pass-Fail System and Attri 
tion Rates at both UM/ Amherst and UM/Boston be brought to the next 
meeting of the committee. Also to be reported on are the items on 
Faculty Teaching Loads and the Disadvantaged Students Programs . 



Proposed Master of Public Administration Degree, UM/ Amherst 



was presented by Dean Appley, who introduced Dr. Glen Gordon, Chairman, 
and Professor Louis Mainzer of the Department of Government. The pre 
posal was approved by the Graduate Council after examination by an 
undergraduate committee. It has also been approved by an outside 
reviewing board. (Document T71-090 ) . 

Dr. Gordon said the program has grown out of interest ex- 
pressed around the state regarding the need for training of public 
administrators. "it meets the temper of the times," he said, "and 
also involves minimal cost." Former President Lederle will teach in 
the program. All faculty will be members of the existing staff. 
Four core courses will be taught by the Department of Government; 
other courses will be interdisciplinary in nature. 



I 



! 



! 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Chairman Troy termed the proposal report most clear and 
comprehensive. President Wood commented on the timeliness of the 
program and the clear capability of the department to spearhead its 
development. He noted important disciplinary aspects and the link 
the program could provide to the Institute of Governmental Services 

Professor Mainzer said that expected enrollment will be 
fairly small and will center initially around the state House intern 
ships. Recruiting for students will begin with formal approval of 
the program. There is still time to include the course descriptions 
in the Graduate School catalog. 

After further discussion, it was moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that the Master of 
Public Administration Degree Program--UM/Amherst, as de- 
tailed in Document ( T71-090 ) , be approved. 

Proposed Soviet and East European Studies Program, UM/Amhe 



was next discussed by Professor Ryavec of the Department of Governme 
An undergraduate major in this area is proposed providing for langu 
competency in Russian or Polish along with emphasis on interdiscipli 
nary studies. (Document T71-091 ) 



Professor Ryavec described existing opportunities in this 
field within the Five-College area. Also, there is a unique and 
coincidental concentration of faculty members interested in teaching 
Soviet and East European Studies at UM/ Amherst. Although general 
demand for this type of training is reportedly down, Professor Ryave 
said that course enrollment on the Amherst campus is good and expect 
to increase. The program will be administered initially out of the 
Department of Slavic Languages. 



After further discussion, and on motion made and seconded. 



it was 



VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that an Undergraduat 
Major in Soviet and East European Studies--UM/ Amherst, as 
detailed in Document T71-091, be approved. 

Overseas Programs, UM/ Amherst , were presented by Dr. Barbara 
Burn, Director of International Programs, who reported that increasing 
numbers of University students now desire to study abroad. 

She termed the proposed Women's Physical Education Program 



3733 



Faculty and 
Educational 
Policy 
4-16-71 



est , UM/Amherst-- 
Soviet and 
East European 
Studies 



it. 
age 



UM/Amherst- 

Overseas 

Programs 



in Cooperation with Chelsea College of Physical Education, England , 
"a rare opportunity for undergraduate majors to study abroad for a 
year within their UM/ Amherst program requirements." Students parti- 
cipating would pay the total costs themselves. Excluding international College of 
travel, these would not exceed the cost of a year at the Amherst camp 



After discussion, and on motion made and seconded, it was 



Women's P. E. 
Program in 
Cooperation 
with Chelsea 



us . P.E. , England 



3734 



Faculty and 
Educational 
Policy 
4-16-71 



COMMITTEE 

Student 
Exchange Pro- 
grams--Univ. of 
Birmingham and 
Univ. of Keele, 
England 



UM/Amherst-- 
Name Change, 
Department of 
Environmental 
Sciences, 
Waltham, to 
The Suburban 
Experiment 
Station, 
Waltham 



UM/Amherst-- 
Name Change , 
Dept. of Hotel 
& Restaurant 
Administration 
to Dept. of 
Hotel, Restauran 
and Travel Admin 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that the UM/ Amherst 
Women's Physical Education Program in Cooperation with 
Chelsea College of Physical Education, Englcnd, as detailed 
in Document T71-092 , be approved. 

The Student Exchange Programs with the University of Bir - 
mingham and the University of Keele, England , were also discussed. 
Dr. Burn pointed out that British universities, also facing enroll- 
ment problems, can only accept our students on an exchange basis. 
Also, funding must be provided for British exchange students to cove 
cost differentials of approximately $500 annually through scholarship 
aid. 

The Chairman expressed approval of the educational aspects 
of international exchange programs in general. President Wood ex- 
pressed hope that a general University policy could soon be developed 
based on these individual programs. 

After discussion, and on motion made and seconded, it was 



VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that University of 

Massachusetts, Amherst, Undergraduate Exchange Programs wij:h 
the University of Keele and the University of Birmingham, 
England, as detailed in Document T71-093 , be approved. 

UM/ Amherst Departmental Name Changes were next considered. 

Dr. Naegele of the Waltham Field Station requested that the: 
Name of the Department of Environmental Sciences, Waltham , be changec. 
to The Suburban Experiment Station, Waltham . This change is intendec. 
to reflect more accurately the type of work actually being done at 
Waltham. The Field Station is located within a suburban area and is 
engaged in projects directly related to its suburban location. 

The Waltham faculty unanimously approves the proposed change 
in name for the Station. Details of the proposal are outlined in 
Document T71-094 . This is a first step toward reorganization of the 
Department of Environmental Sciences, UM/ Amherst. 



It was, therefore, moved, seconded and 

To recommend to the Board of Trustees that the name of the 
Department of Environmental Sciences, Waltham, be changed 
to The Suburban Experiment Station, Waltham, as detailed ir 
Document T71-094 . 

The proposed Change of Name of Department of Hotel and Res - 



VOTED: 



taurant Administration, UM/Amherst , to Department of Hotel, Restauran t 



and Travel Administration was reviewed by Dr. Donald Lundberg. 



He 



briefly summarized changes which have taken place within the hotel 
industry with airlines now owning many major hotel chains and a resul- 
tant merging of hotel and travel management problems. 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

After discussion, it was moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that the name of the 
Department of Hotel and Restaurant Administration, UM/Amhe 
be changed to the Department of Hotel, Restaurant and 
Administration, as detailed in Document T71-095 . 



Trave 



A proposed Change of Name of Department of Landscape Archi 



rst, 
1 



tecture, UM/ Amherst , to Department of Landscape Architecture and 
Regional Planning was reviewed by Professor Procopio. This change 
is requested for the purpose of communicating to prospective student 
that the department offers training in the broader and separate field 
of regional planning as well as in landscape architecture. 

Chancellor Tippo called the department excellent in every 
respect. Chairman Troy also commented that the department has a 
long tradition of excellence in the area of general landscape archi' 
tecture. 

Vice Chancellor Gluckstern noted that there is one remain 
ing formality involved: that of approval by the Faculty Senate. No 
difficulty is expected, however, and the proposal is included at thi 
time along with similar requests. 

After further discussion, it was moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that the name of the 

Department of Landscape Architecture, UM/ Amherst, be changed 
to Department of Landscape Architecture and Regional Plan- 
ning, as detailed in Document T71-096 . 

A report on Continuing Education, UM/ Amherst , was presente 
by Dr. William Venman, Director of the Program. He reviewed progres 
made in the year since the inception of the program with emphasis on 
staffing, funding, and procedures. He outlined the program's basic 
objectives. These are detailed in Document T71-097 . 

Emphasis in the coming year, Dr. Venman said, will be on 
the program design stage. He described as an example one of this 
year's successful programs: a series of seminars for nursing home 
administrators. This program evolved out of a specific need which 
was brought to the attention of the Continuing Education administra- 
tion. Innumerable requests for other courses in a great variety of 
areas continue to pour in. 

Responding to questions, Dr. Venman gave an enrollment 
figure of 250 extension program students. Twenty- two credit and 
twenty- three noncredit courses were offered the first year. He fore 
sees increasing demand for credit extension courses, which will be 
regular University courses taught at a time and in place convenient 
for the students involved. 



3735: 



Faculty and 
Educational 
Policy 
4-16-71 



UM/Amherst-- 
Name Change , 
Dept. of 
Landscape 
Architecture 
tQ' Dept,.. of 
Landscape 
Architecture 
and Regional 
Planning 



UM/Amherst-- 
Name Change , 
Dept. of 
Landscape 
Archh ;ecture 
to Dept. of 
Landscape 
Architecture 
and Regional 
Planning 



UM/Amherst-- 

Continuing 

Education 

Report 

( T71-097 ) 



3736 



Faculty and 
Educational 
Policy 
4-16-71 



COMMITTEE 



UM/Worcester-- 
Appointment, 
Roger B. 
Hickler, Pro- 
fessor and 
Chairman of 
Dept. of Medici 



UM/Boston-- 
Appointment, 
Dorothy N. 
Marshall as 
Dean of 
Faculties and 
Provost 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Trustee Abrams asked whether progress has been made on SWA]' 
Committee suggestions for courses of benefit to specific community 
needs. Dr. Venman responded that English has been offered as a foreign 
language within some of the local Spanish-speaking communities. 

Looking to the future direction of Continuing Education 
Programs, Dr. Venman noted that the area of greatest cooperation so 
far has been with the community colleges. He defined the responsibi- 
lity of individual institutions as follows: (1) to the geographic 
area in which it is located, and (2) "to do what it does well"; that 
is, to provide courses in the fields of knowledge in which it excels 

President Wood called the Continuing Education Report "very 
impressive and encouraging" in terms of initial progress. Referring 
to the "University without Walls" concept, he emphasized the impor- 
tance of rapid development of adequate response in this area. 

Dean Soutter reported on the Proposed Appointment of Dr. 
Roger B. Hickler as Professor and Chairman of the Department of Medi- 
cine, UM/Worcester. He reviewed the qualifications for this important 
post and detailed Fr. Hickler' s training and distinguished record of 
accomplishment. He recommends Dr. Hickler for the post enthusiasti- 
cally. This is also a unanimous recommendation of the UM/Worcester 
np faculty. 

After further brief discussion, and on motion made and 
seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that the appointment 
of Roger B. Hickler, M.D., as Professor and Chairman of the 
Department of Medicine, Medical School, UM/Worcester, be 
approved. 

Dean Soutter also reviewed progress made on future appoint 
ments to the Medical School staff. He described negotiations that 
are under way with various hospitals for the purpose of establishing 
cooperative teaching departments and for locating prospective heads 
of clinical departments still to be staffed at the Medical School. 

Dr. Soutter detailed in particular the arrangements with 
Wesson Maternity Hospital in Springfield for providing work in obste- 
trics for our medical students as an integral part of their training. 

Dean Hoopes presented for approval the Proposed Appointment 
of Dorothy N. Marshall as Dean of Faculties and Provost, UM/Boston . 



This is a most distinguished appointment as Dr. Marshall comes to 
UM/Boston from Bryn Mawr where she has served two terms as Acting 
President of the College. Dr. Marshall received her undergraduate 
education at Smith College and a Ph.D. from Bryn Mawr. She is cur- 
rently serving as Director of Special Studies, College of the Holy 
Cross, Worcester, and as a consultant for development with Worcester 
Polytechnic Institute. 



it was 
VOTED : 



After brief discussion, and on motion made and seconded, 

To recommend to the Board of Trustees that the appointment 
of Dorothy N. Marshall as Dean of Faculties and Provost, 
UM/Boston, be approved. 



37?*' 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



It was also announced that Dean Hoopes has been invited, 
and has accepted the post of Associate Provost, UM/ Amherst. 



Tenure Recommendations, UM/ Amherst , were presented by Vice 
Chancellor Gluckstern. Complete background information, including 
details on procedures involved, had been distributed under a covering 
memorandum dated April 6, 1971. In addition to the extensive evalua- 
tions leading to tenure decisions at all levels, Dr. Gluckstern has 
provided his own comments on each recommendation. 

Noting that it might appear that tenure is awarded to a 
very large fraction of those eligible, Dr. Gluckstern emphasized 
that this is not the case. Some faculty members, for instance, mighjt 
resign before expected non- recommendation for tenure; also, during 
probationary periods, departments may choose not to recommend a faculty 
member for reappointment. These circumstances could and do result 
in the non-appearance of names on lists where--if they had appeared- 
a negative recommendation might result. 

In terms of institutional comparisons of tenure awarded, 
Dr. Gluckstern said that (while formal studies have not been made) 
the ratio in some large universities may run as high as 90 percent. 
At UM/ Amherst, on the basis of his most recent studies, the Vice 
Chancellor said that the adjusted tenure percentage for the faculty 
would be in the mid-forties. Present estimates, taking into consi- 
deration the slow upward trend in tenure recommendations, would 
indicate a future average of 46 percent. 

Trustees Abrams and Shaler expressed concern over student 
input into tenure recommendations. Dr. Gluckstern said that most 
departments would reflect student opinion, although not always on a 
formal basis (that is, with students as formal, voting members of 
departmental personnel committees) . There was consensus that studen 
participation in tenure decisions was of vital concern and should be 
assured. There was also argeement that the quality of teaching should 
be a prime consideration in the tenure decision. 

President Wood commended Dr. Gluckstern on the effectiveness 
of the charts that had been worked out for the tenure presentation. 

After further discussion, it was moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that the Tenure 

Recommendations, UM/ Amherst, as of September 1, 1972, and 
as detailed in Document T71-098 be approved. 



O * 



F & EP 
4-16-71 

UM/Amherst-- 
Robert Hoopes 
Appointment 
as Associate 
Provost 

UM/ Amherst 
Tenure 
Recommenda- 
tions 



UM/ Amherst- 
Tenure 
Recommenda- 
tions 



3738 



F & EP 
4-16-71 

UM/ Amherst- - 
Institute for 
Man and His 
Environment 

COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

The Proposed Institute for Man and His Environment was pre 
sented by Vice Chancellor Gluckstern. He summarized the background 
and history of this proposal which has been under consideration for 
the past two years and reflects faculty concern over the need for 
interdisciplinary work ralated to environmental problems of our 
society. The focus has shifted from the Graduate School where the 
program was initiated to the Provost's Office. As presented, the 
proposal is a compromise which will allow for final review of plans 
before a large-scale institutional commitment is made. 

The Faculty Senate approved this proposal (Document T71-09' Q 
on April 15. If the Institute is approved, Dr. Carri tt will be recom 
mended as Director; Dr. Carl Swanson will be recommended for appoint 
ment as Associate Director. 

After further brief discussion, it was moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that the Institute 
for Man and His Environment, UM/ Amherst, as detailed in 
Document T71-099 (pages 5-6), be approved. 

The meeting was adjourned at 3:25 p.m. 




Robert J. McCartney 
Secretary, Board of Trustees! 





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COMMITTEE 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 
April 26, 1971, 12 noon, Yankee Drummer Inn, Auburn 



PRESENT: Trustees and Trustee Staff : 

Chairman Healey, President Wood; Trustees Boyden, Gordon, 
Haigis, Pumphret, Troy; Treasurer Johnson, Secretary 
McCartney, Assistant Secretary (Pro Tern) Harman, Mrs. Hull 

Administration, Faculty, Staff, and Invited Guests : 

From System Office : Vice Presidents Lashman, Phillips, 
Mr. Broadhurst 

From UM/ Amherst : Chancellor Tippo, Vice Chancellor for 
Academic Affairs and Provost Gluckstern, Faculty Senate 
Representative Roberts 

From UM/Boston : Chancellor Broderick 

From UM/Worcester: Dean Soutter 



The meeting was convened by Chairman Healty at 12 noon. 
After brief opening remarks by the Chairman and the President, the 
committee moved into executive session to discuss a personnel matter 
At 12:15 p.m. the committee came out of executive session. 

Treasurer Johnson noted the necessity to have another offi 
cial in the Treasurer's Office designated as signatory for the Unive 
sity on checks and other financial matters. 

A motion was made and seconded, and it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that Donald W. Cadigte 
Treasurer's Office, University of Massachusetts, be autho- 
rized, as directed by the Treasurer, or in his absence, to 
sign or endorse in the name of the University of Massachu- 
setts or the Board of Trustees of the University of Massa- 
chusetts such official documents, contracts and vouchers, 
including checks, drafts, certificates of deposit, letters 
of credit, advances from the State Treasurer and withdrawal 
orders, as require the signature of the financial officer 
of the University provided that all checks, drafts, certi- 
ficates of deposit, letters of credit and withdrawal orderjs 
in an amount of $10,000 or more shall require the additional 
signature of either the Treasurer of the University or the 
Associate Treasurer. 



It was noted by Trustee Pumphret that additional discreti 
funds were necessary for the President's Office to meet expenses for 
the balance of the year. 



3739 



Executive 
4-26-71 



Designation of 
Signatory for 
Treasurer' s 
Office- 
Donald W. 
Cadigan 



onary Additional 

Discretionary 
Funds--0f fice 
of President 



3740 



Executive 
4-26-71 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

A motion was made and seconded, and it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees transfer of $5,000.00 
from the Trust Fund Interest Account — Reserve to the Asso- 
ciate Alumni Account for the discretionary use of the Office 
of the President. 

The meeting was adjourned at 12:20 p.m. 



fVU* 



\&uHe>"4£- 




Lawrence J. Harman 

Assistant Secretary (Pro Tern) 

Board of Trustees 



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